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I suggest that if you are really concerned about electrical safety, hire a professional to look at your electrical installation. You going around with a tester screwdriver and seeing it light up MEANS NOTHING as these testers are very sensitive and light up at the smallest of signals. Capacitive coupling between wires is enough to make it light up. That ...


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You were correct to bond the rods to each other As per NEC 820.100(D), a CATV grounding rod shall be bonded to the house grounding electrode system with no smaller than a #6 copper wire: (D) Bonding of Electrodes. A bonding jumper not smaller than 6 AWG copper or equivalent shall be connected between the community antenna television system's ...


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There is also the lightning danger. The goal is not to "invite" the lightning to get inside and to destroy many electric/electronic devices in the house - even if not connected to the antenna or TV. A propper surge/lightning protection should be considered and can be complicated sometimes. Another issue is a ground loop which could result from multiple ...


1

Two many questions so I will tackle a few code issues. The water pipe is required to be bonded to your electrical system so go ahead and use it as a second electrode. In truth that water pipe is normally a much better electrode than a standard 8’ ground rod. I might drop a 2nd 8’ at 6’ or more away from your existing unknown rod. Many people here probably ...


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I do a lot of work on older homes and see stuff like this all the time. Keep in mind that the equipment grounding conductor (EGC), that bare safety ground, was not always present in wiring systems. If you see old homes - a little older than this one - with two-prong receptacles, those were wired back before the EGC was part of the system. I think when ...


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I think an inspector could call out NEC 200.2(B) Continuity. The continuity of a grounded circuit conductor shall not depend on a connection to a metal enclosure, raceway, or cable armor.


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It's not a good idea to run the neutrals to the enclosure attached ground bars for reasons other have mentioned. Although it's OK to run the grounds to the neutral buss bar, I prefer to keep them separated. Also, note that on a SUB-panel, it's imperative the neutrals and grounds are separated and the neutral is NOT bonded to the enclosure. Instead, you ...


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You're absolutely right that a best practice is to separate neutrals and grounds. There are a bunch of reasons, but I'll give you one: you can replace your neutral-ground bonding screw with a bonding wire, and then stick a clamp ammeter around it. Voilà, ground faults are revealed! However, this best-practice is not a Code requirement and you can't be ...


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It may sound funny but it is ok and even required in a way your neutral and ground being on the same bar is fine but look closer and you will see a jumper to ground (the panel is required to be grounded, your grounded and grounding conductors are tied together and then to the case so it is functionally the same on separate bars that are bonded and connected ...


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