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Hot answers tagged

9

I use a plate tamper. Most of the hardware stores, garden centers, and big box home improvement places around here carry them. Image from http://www.naturalbuildingblog.com/tampers-from-building-supply-centers/


6

Do NOT do this. It is wrong in so many ways: Completely illegal from the electrical code standpoint. Using a 120V outlet for 220V application is incorrect and confusing. Mixing 120V and 240V on the same outlet will lead to dangerous mistakes. Redeploying a safety GND line as a Neutral is going to get someone or some equipment fried. Put the house back to ...


6

Yes. Modern code requires switches to be grounded. If you are not using self grounding switches and metal boxes (and you are not), you need to run a wire from the switch ground screw to the bundle. Attaching to the end of any one of those wire will do. Supplement: While the electrical police are unlikely to come pounding on your door, there is a reason for ...


5

Install equipment in real junction boxes I've done a lot of wiring and I cannot imagine how you would get a ground wire anywhere near a 2x4. Your wires (including ground) are doing one of two things: traveling inside a conduit (pipe) into a junction box, or travel inside a cable and the whole cable enters a junction box, so ground is inside the junction ...


4

Search for a tool called a "dirt tamper" It's basically a flat retangular metal plate with a slot for a handle.


4

Maybe if you owned the transformer Imagine you had total control of the transformer. (which you probably don't). You would be able to assure that the neutral-ground bond did not exist anywhere. If you accomplished this, and didn't have any defects in your wiring, then you would have an isolated system which I discuss here. There are advantages and ...


4

A crimp on eyelet or forked spade connector should do. There's nothing particular about a turntable ground wire like there might be for an antenna wire. I'd probably cut off the damaged end, re-strip with the appropriate size tool, and crimp to fresh wire. A locking pliers (Vice-Grip) works will in a pinch. So to speak. It's also possible that the wire ...


4

You may not have a ground-fault at all. The diagnostic LED displays the last recorded trip code, not any current conditions. Reading through the Eaton documentation, it turns out that it may be reporting a fault that was caused during factory testing. Upon installation, if the breaker has not experienced a trip that records a code, it will display the ...


4

Grounding of metal cased equipment is most often done for safety reasons, rather than ESD protection. If a fault occurs inside the equipment that places line voltage on the chassis, the voltage is shunted to ground and will trip the breaker on the circuit. This protects you from accidental electrocution. Edit: Since this is powered by a brick, safety ...


4

That particular switch is made for construction installers to do very fast work so they can get 2 houses done in 1 day. "Time is money, friend". I imagine the source of your inquiry is that you notice how easy backstabs are to install, and you wonder why ground doesn't use backstabs too. This is not allowed because backstabs are unreliable. Historically, ...


4

No. Electricity travels in loops. If you don't have a loop, it will just sit there. In mains electricity (which I assumed we're talking about here since that's what we do in a home improvement stack), if you somehow manage to ground any of that, you'll get a big bang poof until something burns, blows, or trips. Now that I see your edit, I see more ...


4

You are correct in your assumption that your neutral and grounding conductor must be separated in subpanels per the NEC which only allows neutrals and grounds to be attached on the same bus in the Main Panel with a main circuit breaker. You or a contractor should go out and purchase a second bus and separate the conductors. I can also say that your ...


4

Get a PK7GTA and clean this mess up Your panel appears to be a Square-D QO612L100RB (of unknown series, though). The correct grounding bar for your panel is a Square-D PK7GTA; this should be pretty easy to find at any electrical supply house that carries the Square-D product line, and shouldn't cost more than $10. With the feeder breaker off, you'll need ...


4

The cure for this is a surface conduit starter box. This box will sit on top of the existing box about 1-1/4" proud of the wall. It will provide both the statutory cubic inches you need for all those wires and yokes, and the practical cubic inches for your dimmers. Normally it's intended that you then use its sides as a launch point for surface conduit,...


3

You can retrofit a just ground wire back to the panel. They broadly liberalized the rules for this in 2014 to allow this for almost any circuit -- but they had already liberalized the rules for dryer circuits some time prior. In fact, since the washer and dryer plugs both come out of the same service panel, they can share the ground wire. Grounds don't ...


3

The hole is to aid the installer make a quick tight connection, push the tip of the bare wire through the hole then bend the wire and wrap it tightly around the screw. Note


3

The green screw firmly grounds the lamp to the mounting bracket. You are asking "How does the mounting bracket ground itself to the steel junction box? Does only metal-metal contact suffice, or does it need to be wired also?" Yes, metal-metal contact between parts is acceptable grounding if all these are true: the mounting bracket is bottomed out "...


3

GFCI plug in testers with a trip button won't work without some ground connection. When the test button is depressed it is basically a high resistance leak to the ground pin, with no ground wire connected the test fails. Specifically this type of device: Additionally: If the outlet is GFCI protected but has no ground it should be marked "GFCI protected ...


3

Retrofitting grounds is legal now. NEC 2014 (which PG&E would surely endorse) gives broad permission to retrofit just a ground wire as a separate wire. What's more, different circuits can share grounds as long as they originate back to the same panel. The RV being long and narrow, I would run a "ground bus" along the bottom of the RV (protected ...


3

Years ago I bought an older trailer like this. All the outlets were 2-wire. Fortunately, all the runs back to the fuse box were fairly short. Back in the days when it was built it was assumed that all the neutrals would be connected to a ground bus in the box. So we made sure they were bonded and attached to a utility company-provided ground rod. We ...


3

We can start with this: As installed, the grounded conductor for your dryer receptacle is white or gray and cannot be re-identified as an equipment grounding conductor according to the National Electrical Code. 250.119 Identification of Equipment Grounding Conductors. Unless required elsewhere in this Code, equipment grounding conductors shall be ...


3

Follow the instructions. You are obliged (NEC 110.3) to follow the extra grounding bar's instructions. That's because those instructions are the basis for UL granting it a listing as safe. As long as you met the instructions, feel free to exceed. So you can add a ground wire even if it's not required. Generally you don't downsize a service wire (i.e. ...


3

Contrary to common opinion, you don't need a special tool for every job. Depends on the size and depth you may get away using a sledge hammer to ram the soil down. If the hole is deep/narrow, a scrap length of timber (lumber) around 4x2 and long enough to reach the bottom is adequate. Use it as is, or like a big nail punch in combination with that ...


2

Any freestanding hammock post without lateral binding will eventually work loose. The standard configuration is to use a 6x6x9 wooden beam and sink it three feet into the ground with a footing made from an 80-pound bag of cement. Where I live the only place to get a wooden beam of that size is a sawmill over 50 miles away. Alternatively you could use a 3" ...


2

The National Electrical Code Article to support Paul Logan's answer [attention to (C)]: 250.148 Continuity and Attachment of Equipment Grounding Conductors to Boxes. If circuit conductors are spliced within a box or terminated on equipment within or supported by a box, all equipment grounding conductor(s) associated with any of those circuit conductors ...


2

The ground wire coming with the supply cable should be securely connected to the box itself with a threaded machine screw. From there this ground should come out of the box and wire nutted to a wire from the screw on the fixture strap. Under that same wire nut include the ground wire from the new fixture. 1 No 2 Yes 3 see above With the ground wire ...


2

The distance from the panel should not affect tester results for any reasonable value of distance and wire size. Yours are reasonable. Even if the distances were outrageous, it should still ring out properly if the tester is the only load. E=IR, and if I is very small, E is small for almost any purchasable value of R. That tester is a mystery ...


2

This is in addition to Norm's excellent answer, which is the correct answer (and I upvoted it). ESD stands for "electrostatic discharge." It's usually used to describe protecting highly sensitive electronics (computer chips) from the kind of discharge you get walking across a carpet. That is NOT the case here. It's odd that they're using the term "ESD" ...


2

The traditional would be drill holes, insert plugs and use a cable clip with a nail or screw. This is a lot of work. Alternatives would be to glue it. As to connecting it, the Good way to do it is with cable lugs. That requires tools to install. Solid core may also be terminated directly to the ground lugs of the rack. But note that you are not bonding to ...


2

Functionally what you do is get a jumper to connect the ground to the neutral since the outlet for 3 prong doesn't have its own ground. Take a look at Harper's answer here


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