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12

It helps for sure. There have been a ton of studies done on this and I have read at least 10-11. At one point in time I was going into a partnership for a "greening" business. Your variance is somewhere between 1-15%. There are a ton of variables. Here is an OK study I read a few weeks ago from FSEC. I personally don't like this study because they ...


10

If you plan to use that collected water for drinking and cooking then you will need a proper filtration / treatment system... Ingesting diluted bird-droppings is not a good idea... So, a simple filter may not be enough, you may well need UV treatment, but you should consult the authorities for the standards in your location you are legislated to meet and ...


6

DMoore gives a good explanation and practical advice. This is just a summary of the science side. Heat is bad for an AC unit. More heat, more work Heat gets transferred three ways radiation convection conduction Radiation occurs when sunlight directly hits something (like the body of the unit) - shade reduces this. Convection occurs when ...


4

Insulation value of masonry walls vs wood-frame walls You should be able to find guidance. For example Scottish Guidance, UK Guidance In the UK, I believe regulations specify maximum U-values U-values are measured in watts per square metre per degree Kelvin (W/m²K). So for example, if we consider a double glazed window with a U-value of 2.8, for every ...


3

Without knowing more details, any advice is going to be very generic. Preventing Energy Loss Look into weather sealing, if you find windows or doors that are drafty Add attic insulation if you don't already have it (or increase the amount if you are able) Upgrade to double-pane windows with Low-E coatings to minimize heat loss in winter and heat gain in ...


2

In my last kitchen remodel, I used linoleum, mostly because it was a natural and "green" product. Note that vinyl flooring is often inappropriately called linoleum. You can read more online, but I thought it looked great, was easy to install and care for, and supposedly lasts a very long time. Here is a Georgia Tech labelled paper that discusses the ...


2

Your method works to a first approximation. One big assumption is that you had no (or little) costs to heat and cool during that smallest-bill month of May. The other big assumption is that all of your other loads during that month of May are representative of the loads the rest of the year. If both of those are true, then your method should be quite ...


1

I think you've overstated this. Many communities in rural areas live off rain water and enjoy good quality and clean water (without complaint). It's important to treat it (as your caveat makes clear) with UV for fecal contamination but I'm far from convinced that your statements around drinking water with regards to metal ion, nitrates and dust particles is ...


1

No, it isn't, but not because of the solar panels. If you have access to municipal water, there's no economically viable way to make rainwater potable. Roughly speaking, rainwater is about as dirty as "grey" waste water (from sinks, showers etc.) and it needs a similar amount of processing before (re)use. Rainwater contains all kinds of pollutants from the ...


1

Wipe it off with a wet rag, then see if it comes back. This could be the result of too much flux being applied before soldering and the excess not wiped off. If you cannot get it off with water, you could try household vinegar on a rag, then wipe all the vinegar off with a wet rag. The excess flux would have to have been carried down the pipe by water on ...


1

If your house had wood siding or other siding that allowed the vines to grow under it, then I would say keep it away. Since you have brick veneer, that will not be an issue, It may attach itself to your brick if it is a climbing vine, that would be the biggest issue other than the vent you have in the picture. The vine can grow into and through the screen ...


1

I'm sorry, but I can't give generic conservation advice. For the kind of money you're spending, it's crazy to take blind shots and pray. You need whole house power monitoring This is a system that installs in your service panel and clamps onto the ammeters. It listens to the electrical noise and current flow from each device, and makes educated guesses ...


1

Our 46-year-old tract house has a 3-in-12 pitch truss roof, loose Rockwool insulation, and no baffles at all, not even the cardboard. The 2 x 4 studs are 24-inches OC. The roof sheathing is minimal thickness and maybe someday I will redo the sheathing. At that time I will have baffles installed. If and when I put in bats without adding baffles, I was going ...


1

Two obvious but invasive ways are to: Take up the roof sheeting and work the baffles from above the rafters. Remove the ceiling drywall under the baffle area and install the baffles from below. With a low sloped roof trying to work within the confines of the attic will be very difficult. If there are protruding roofing nails the tight areas can be ...


1

It's not easy but it provides a piece of mind. I've just been using 3M sponges with scrub-pads and Meyers Household Cleaner. I've peeled the wallpaper in three rooms and followed up with a good scrub. Let it Dry. Then spackle and sand spots (120 or finer) that need it. Let that Dry. Then sand patches and lightly sand whole wall. Wipe down with a damp sponge ...


1

As for sheep's wool it is a great insulating product. I actually ran into 50 rolls at a local Habitat store that had them going for $4 a piece. So I bought them all. They were non-faced rolls and have to be one of the most pleasant insulation experiences of my life. However you have two problems and neither of them have to do with cleaning. First you ...


1

If by Copper-Green you mean any of the copper-naphthalene wood preservatives out there used to prevent wood rot, and it was applied to the studding, etc. that supports this fireplace shell: These products are not to be used within living spaces or in construction where the fumes will be pulled into the living space. Apply caulking to seal up the air gaps ...


1

They're not to everyone's taste. They roll up into a large box above the window -- either inside or outside. And they are more expensive than blinds. Maybe Europeans like them for the noise and privacy factor and that may not be as much of a concern here in the states. Having said that I have wished many times that I had them in my house. Favorite feature is ...


1

Although I don't have any research numbers to compare for you, I have discussed the building differences from Europe compared to the USA with others more experienced. Generally speaking, in northern climates, you would see more wood framed buildings vs more masonry in southern climates. Masonry walls without cavities have a lower R rating as compared to ...


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