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29

Why use any gravel? Fill entirely with soil.


13

"Landscape Timber" or, sometimes, "used railroad tie" - but "landscape timber" is what you'll find at most typical lumber suppliers. They will typically last several years - if well pressure-treated, longer. It's hard to know if they are really well pressure-treated until they start failing and you look at a calendar to figure out how long it's been. ...


11

Sounds like you got "Crusher Run", when you wanted "Washed Stone". This site has a good description of some different types. Crusher Run Washed stone It's used as a base for driveways and roads, but is typically compacted and covered by another material (asphalt for example). You may have been thinking of something more like pea gravel, or similar. ...


8

Yes, it is used in construction somewhat commonly. There are a couple of different situations where I have personally be involved with its use: Soil stabilization for large fills - In areas where the ground is soft and heavy construction equipment needs to move (e.g. access roads) it can be placed in layers and filled with soil to help distribute the weight ...


8

I would not recommend filling with gravel. Just think about if you ever need to dig at the same spot again, it will just be a hassle. Also gravel costs money and needs to be transported home. I would just use soil from a place in the yard that has to much.


7

A "sided" shovel (AKA coal or transfer shovel) is very efficient, especially if you have a hard, flat surface to shovel off of (plywood is great).


6

I watched my fence installers and there where some areas that had a lot of stone. They would take a pointed metal rod and jam it into the hole to loosen up the rock and then use the post hole digger to get the loosened rock out. He alternated between the pointed rod and the post hole digger. Two men dug 9 holes by hand and finished the fence in one day.


6

First and foremost, will setting two posts in concrete behind this wall create any structural risk to the wall? You will not be adding any loads to the retaining wall that are of much concern. The wood screen wall is relatively very light so not adding surcharge to the soil behind the retaining wall and any forces from wind are relatively minor. The gravel ...


5

3/4 minus (21AA in US Midwest) is perfect for this application. Hope you have some college kids around, that's nearly 2 cubic yards! I would overdig another 6" to be able to place an edging to retain the gravel and make a clean edge. Place the gravel in 2" "lifts" (lay down 2") and then compact with a plate vibrator. Repeat twice. Enjoy! 6" compacted ...


5

The less water the better, to a point. Excess water will weaken the mix. At some point in the other direction, there is not enough water for the hydration process(around 0.25:1 water:cement). In general though, to have a workable mix, there will be enough water for hydration. Use as little water as possible to make a workable mix, around 0.45:1 is fine. Don'...


5

Is there a better tool for the job? As for manual shovels, use what works for you. I prefer a pointed garden shovel for larger rock. It's easier to 'get into' the pile with and you don't over-load it. Then I tend to use the flat coal shovel like HerrBag recommends when the pile gets low and you are doing more scraping of the loose material together.


4

It's generically called a screen, and they range from a wooden frame with a section of metal mesh on it that you shovel mixed material on, which sorts itself by gravity, on up to a mechanized thing on the back of a tractor trailer with a bunch of conveyor belts to take in mixed material, then sort and distribute the various sizes. Depending on your ...


4

Mix up a wet slurry of cement, sand and gravel and pour it in, then make some a little less wet and pack it in.


4

Unless you have concentrated loads there (commercial vehicle traffic, etc.), don't worry about it. Shovel what you can back in and be happy (assuming that you can plainly see the extent of the excavation). If it's a concern, Try using some 2-3" pipe or flex tubing. Fill it with coarse sand or fine gravel. Slide the pipe into the end of the hole, then use a ...


4

There was an episode of This Old House where they used it to make a patch of grass that could be driven over. They filled the holes with soil, and then put sod over the top. I'm not sure if this is the same product, but it looks very similar to what they used on the show. According to the website of one of the manufacturers, it can support up to 65 tonnes ...


4

What shape is the gravel? Go look at railroad ballast, you want that stuff, aka "crushed stone", very jaggy and will interlock when tamped down. Very hard to shovel for that reason. You want a smaller size though. Any sort of round or half-round pea gravel type stuff has to go. Get a loader, shovel it outta there, save it for aggregate for concrete. ...


4

The answer is RAILROAD TIES. The timbers in your photo are Railroad Ties. The railroad will change the ties on a regular basis. They are impregnated with creosote and as a result they are very heavy. In Alaska the railroad will give the old ones away for free occasionally. I have built retaining walls with them. For the purpose of your fire pit area they ...


4

Once it's in place most gravel is not all that mobile, but it's also not hard to dig. I would not bother with a power auger, a clamshell posthole digger should get it done easily. I've just revisited some areas I backfilled with gravel to make some modifications, and got in just fine with a clamshell and a shovel - any large rocks were not in the area I ...


3

I haven't used it & only saw it here or there, but a whopping 1-minute of familiarization showed it has some pretty awesome claims. However, it would seem to be mostly for water management. If you need that then yeah go for it & I don't see why you wouldn't be able to plow snow off of it. But, the problem I see is if you envision keeping the grid ...


3

It looks like your land sits a little lower than the adjacent roadway. It would be a cost but if you pave the first 10 ft of your driveway you can make a little berm with that pavement. Since pavement is non-porous the amount of water to overcome a couple of inches of slope would be substantial. Yet those same couple of inches will not be much to drive over. ...


3

Cold patch asphalt repair can be packed into holes and stands up well for standard car/truck use. If the hole is really deep you can pack crushed rock to fill the hole and save some $. I would not use pea gravel to fill the deeper holes as it never locks together like crushed rock. After filling and adding the patch material I like to run over it with my ...


3

It is virtually impossible to specify the proportion of water in a concrete mix due to the wide range of moisture content in the sand used, Regarding "old" cement powder - if kept completely and utterly dry it will work fine after literally years. The only downside of using old cement is that the Chromium additives change from relatively harmless to ...


3

I know this is an old post but I will answer it in case someone wants the right answer. All you need to do is make the rim joist your beam and attach the floor joists with joist hangers. So the beam will be at the end of the deck the same height as the floor joists. If you need a beam in the middle you can make the beam the same height and add floor ...


3

For the top half or so of the pile, I first create a small indentation at the bottom of the pile with a shovel. This lets me drive my wheelbarrow right into the pile and then I can simply rake gravel directly into it. I second HerrBag's suggestion for choice of shovel with the smaller gravel sizes. Worth noting that once when I had a large pile to move I ...


3

You could use a plate compactor and attempt to compact the gravel into the soil to provide a firm base. Take a look at this similar post for good suggestions.


2

Unless you have a particular reason to think your garage is sinking into the ground, I wouldn't worry about this much weight. Presumably the existing asphalt floor can support the weight of a car, which has more than 500 lbs of weight per tire (concentrated on a much smaller contact area than your safe). Besides, what's the worst that could happen? If in a ...


2

Your downspout extension may be installed incorrectly. It appears that the black pipe coming out of the hill is not sloped properly and is causing water to pool inside of the pipe. Since the pipe is not draining properly, organic debris such as leaves will clog the pipe and render it inoperable. Since water takes the path of least resistance, it will back ...


2

The correct mixing ratio would be 1:1.5:1 — 1 cement : 1.5 sand : 1 gravel stones with 0.4 water. If you use more water it will leave holes (porosity of the mortar), and if you use less water, it will not lead to hydration.


2

For shoveling, I second @herrbag ... Alternatively, for the top of the pile, the gravel can be raked off the top and into a chute that empties into a wheel barrow or a 5 gal bucket. As the height of the pile dwindles, a hole can be dug into the ground for the 5 gal bucket, and continued use of the chute. OR ... A manageable amount of gravel can be raked ...


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