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34

Is my cabinet maker correct They are right that drilling clean holes in glass is more difficult than in wood or steel. In my opinion, they are not right to say that visible cracking around the hole is normal. They are a professional and part of the price they charge is for having the skill, experience and tools to do the job better and quicker than you ...


28

I used to work for a company that built machines that drilled these holes (though we did it in much larger pieces, usually 3/4" to 2" thickness). It's not a hard process, it's slightly expensive, but it's doable. The process is basically as follows: Use two diamond-tipped drill bits to cut the hole (one above and one below); Use a water-jet to push water ...


21

Even if the windows were super thick, it wouldn't be strong enough to handle the pressure exerted by a properly positioned ladder. A ladder is supposed to be sloped 25%, like this: With someone standing near the top of the ladder, that means roughly 20% of his weight is directed as lateral force, directly into the wall or window, conveyed by the points of ...


19

You can't. The tempered glass will completely shatter if this is even attempted. If you absolutely must have tempered glass with a hole in it, the hole or any other shaping must be done before the tempering process.


16

Don't do it. Put the ladder above the window, then clean by putting your arms through the rungs. Shouldn't the windows have a way to tilt them inward and clean from inside the house? Most every modern window I've seen has a way to do that. You may want to get a ladder stabilizer:


11

Glazing manufacturers have spent decades perfecting a spacer system that does not eventually leak and condense. They still haven't completely perfected it, though they are much better than 20 years ago. There is no way you're going to put together a system that does not eventually leak, especially with a vacuum. You'll have a better chance with inert gas, ...


10

Either use a A frame ladder or a squeegee on a pole. I personally wouldn't trust my health on the structural strength of glass.


9

You cannot cut or drill heat tempered glass. Not waterjet, not laser, not hot needle, not under water. Physics, not technique. There is no secret formula for cutting or drilling tempered glass. You can do edge work if you are careful, but you are weakening the edge substantially in doing so. IF you don't remove too much glass it may not break. If you ...


9

The level of cracking you're showing on the left is not normal. There is some roughness around the hole on the right which is generally normal. Actually, the hole on the right is, more or less, what it should look like when you drill a mirror or any glass. This is one of those skills that takes practice to become consistently good at. As for replacing the ...


8

I would not even suggest taking the chance that it could hold you up to stand on it. Think of the possible serious injury that could result if it were to break and give way when you were standing on it. You would do well to just move the desk out away from the wall and use a step ladder or stool of some sort to get up to the area where you intend to hang ...


7

Standard EMT tool for tempered glass car windows (after taping - packing tape preferred over duct tape) is an automatic center punch. A hammer and nail will work the same, it's mostly being a one-handed tool that's easy to carry that makes the ACP the preferred tool among EMTs. If you're "smashing the whatever" out of it, you're doing it wrong. It just ...


7

First really look for the watermarks. These are usually ultrafaint in a corner. They could even be upside down. Second look for any chips on the edges. If there are chips it isn't tempered. Third if you need the hole just drill it. Use the smallest bit you have to start and work your way to the size you need. Wear gloves but putting a tiny hole in ...


6

This sounds like a bad plan. 550 pounds (or more, likely) is just way too much weight to try to hack something together. Even if you put a support in the middle, then you need to make sure it's perfectly balanced or you're going to crack the aquarium at the pivot point — the glass tank is going to be very unforgiving of an uneven surface. Plus, think of ...


6

Have you thought of a bathroom window film? It's very easy to put there, and it works really nicely. I mean one of these: They come in a variety of patterns, from plain to very fancy. I think they are easier to apply than the sprays (I've put them on couple windows without any problems). They are made to be in the bathroom so they last long, and the ...


6

That is not a glass break tool. It's a chip inserter. You put the microchip in the U shaped slot at the bottom, then use the plunger at the top to push the chip in to the circuit board or holder.


5

Alternative idea. Test the sealer on a piece of left over tile. Let the sealer get onto the glass and wipe it up shortly thereafter. Compare the before/after -- if you see no notable damage, just put the stuff on and have someone clean up the glass right behind you.


5

Suction cups are used with success in this situation. Search for "glass table suction cups". The cups have a small cylindrical nub that sits in a hole you will have to drill for each cup. You should only need about four. With the suction cups, the table would be secure, would have some (minimal) give when struck, and would be easy to replace.


5

It's really hard to assure that they won't be under load anytime in the next 50 years. Obviously, the bottles only need to break once to be ruined. Also, depending on the type of bottle, it might be hard to find lids that are waterproof, rustproof, and won't decompose. I recommend using something sturdier, like large diameter PVC or ABS pipe. It's easy ...


4

Get a combo sponge / squeegee on an extendable pole. They work very well. It is also possible to get these window washing soap bottles that have an integrated sprayer mechanism. You attach these to a garden hose for water. They easily can spray a nice and vigorous soapy stream or water at the windows over 20 feet (like 6 meters) high. Normally the ...


4

Since you are on Stack Exchange, I can safely assume you have access to the internet. Use Google to search for 'Glass Store', and in its local search it should find some in your area. If it doesn't, go to any hardware store and ask if they can order glass or cut glass to fit. If they don't, ask them where you can go.


4

I agree that replacing with tempered glass is your best option. But if you want cheap, there are other options. I don't know about regular super glue or Krazy glue. It would probably work fine. Loctite makes a super glue specifically for glass. I used to work for an art glass/leaded glass company 20 years ago and we used a glue that was cured by UV light....


4

Unless you have some particular reason related to plasti-dip's peel-ability to choose that, just hit it with some black paint, and be careful not to scrape it when moving it (indeed, hit it with some black paint, and then you might want to cover the paint with paper for damage protection before moving it, after you check that the paint job is perfect.) I'd ...


4

I woud not try the "cut out or smash one pane" approach. I might try removing the pane as a unit (yep, you're going to have to dis-assemble wherever it was "built in place" a little) and drilling the seal/separator full of holes to ventilate it - or simply go ahead and replace it. If ventilated, the ventilation should be to the outside air in a heating ...


4

I have successfully and very gingerly broken the interior side of a double pane window and removed the shards and chips with pliers and fingers--again, gingerly. The stain/fog inside had made them look unattractive and blurred the view. I hit carefully with a hammer in a lower corner, and started pulling from there. However, the inside of the outer pane--...


4

Yes, you can. You can't exactly CUT a hole, but you can GRIND a hole, if you're gentle and patient. This feller demonstrates grinding tempered glass. About half-way down this page, "sammiesoo" claims to have sand-blasted and ground tempered glass before. This forum also discusses methods for grinding tempered automotive glass. So the answer is hardly "...


4

I'd do the packaging tape and call it a day. If the glass is clean it'll hold no problem. If you're really worried, silicone or similar would fill the void between the tape. Then, start looking for your neighborhood vandal.


4

Good news - it came off! A Hot air gun was useless as was a butane torch - I suspect the heat was not softening anything and the adhesives were well and truely burned on. Perhaps spraying cold water on the hot glass might have helped crack it, but read on. In the end I used a teatowel in one hand to cup the entire fitting and then pushed an "automatic ...


4

There are only two issues that are required to be changed and are NOT covered by any “grandfathered clause”: 1) smoke detectors for sleeping rooms, and 2) safety glass within 18” of a floor (ICC R308.4.3) or 24” of a door (R308.4.2) The Code says “safety glass”, not cover plate glass with film. Look near the corners of the glass to see if there is an ...


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