Hot answers tagged

7

So here's the deal, and here's how your friend "helped" you. There's a rule of "thumb" floating out there that we shouldn't let voltage drop exceed 3% when calculating a long run. This rule of "thumb" was invented by cable manufacturers, I'm fairly sure. There's no requirement whatsoever in the electrical code for this. It's just not there. They do ...


7

Yes, a 10 AWG ground wire is fine for up to a 60A circuit. The 8/2 Romex (NM) cable is good for amperage up to 40 amps. However, the breaker must match the socket / EV charger spec. If the socket is a NEMA 6-30 or 14-30, the breaker must be 30A. If the EV charger docs specify 30A breaker, then that must be so. Again, the 8/2 cable is perfectly fine ...


5

Pressure gauges commonly use a Bourdon tube. Bourdon tubes are a coiled metal tube and as the pressure increases, it forces the coil straight which then moves the needle. (think blowing a party horn, which causes it to unroll) The type of fluid (water/air) makes no difference to the tube, only the pressure exerted against the tube does. And since most ...


4

Specifications shows 115V @ 4.8amp. With that values it is likely he stated to get at least a 16gauge extension cord. I prefer to get at least 14gauge cords as the price is usually very near those for the 16gauge cords.


4

If your ambition for the shed would call for more power when you can afford to fix things, put in a sub-panel with that in mind, not one limited by your 12Gauge (20Amps - depending on the exact wire you have, 120V or remotely possibly 240V, 2x120V) feed wire. Assuming a 12 Ga 120V feed (white, black, bare or green) the breaker at the house should be 20A and ...


4

Everything you have described fits with a single 12 AWG 20A circuit feeding the shed. That is OK, provided a few things are in order, but is not ideal. The 50' distance is not a problem - as far as voltage drop it can be treated as if the shed was just a room in your house. Cable/Wire Type Underground wire must be one a few very specific cable types or be ...


3

First, a ground wire and neutral is mandatory for this setup. You cannot set up groundless, and you cannot "bootleg ground" off neutral as once was legal for dryers. This is extra important because if a neutral wire has a problem, it will electrify the grounds - and that'll shock and drown people in the hot tub. If the hot tub already requires a 30A ...


3

Solid vs stranded A lot of people who work 99% in Romex find themselves gravitating toward solid wire because "it's the devil they know", they have no idea the difference, and they fret about terminations. I work 99% in conduit and stranded is the only way to go. When you have a solid wire in the bundle (I'm cheap, I reuse wire). you know it and it's a ...


3

Since the entire route is conduit, you need 8 AWG THWN-2 copper. This will be individual wires, not a cable in a sheath. You can also use 6 AWG Aluminum, but you won't find it. You might find it if you shopped at a proper electrical supply house, but you'd get funny looks and an "are you sure". In fact, Just don't use aluminum - installation is more ...


3

Sounds like cheap is a motivation, but there's a relationship between depth of dig and cost of materials. At 24" of cover you can use plain cable such as UF. At 18" of cover you can use cheapie PVC conduit or EMT. At 6" of cover you can use Rigid metal conduit. So as expensive as Rigid might be, it might be significantly cheaper than renting a ...


3

You would not bundle seven under one wire nut. I expect someone will amplify my answer with direct code call out. Basically, no more than 4... almost EVER, under any wire nut, and you must use the nut sized for the largest collective wire awg you are using. (not just buy a larger wire nut to stuff more inside of it). Further, do not exceed the current ...


3

In the description These list 7#14's however the box only says 4-#14's on the outside. Instead of trying to put them all under one wire nut, make a short jumper and put 3 under one wire nut and 4 under the other. Make sure you strip back enough wire to make the joint work. Test each wire by pulling on it after you make up the joint. Edit: You asked about ...


3

Typical "thermostat wire" is a NEC/UL type CL2 cable, just like your speaker wire says it is, so as a replacement for an 18/2 thermostat cable, this will work just fine.


3

Note: All block quotes are sections from NFPA-70:2014 (aka 2014 NEC) 1st problem: 8 awg NM can only carry a max of 40 amps NM is treated as a cable assembly with 60°C conductors per 334.80 even though the individual conductors are typically rated at 90°C: 334.80 Ampacity. The ampacity of Types NM, NMC, and NMS cable shall be determined in accordance with ...


2

The "Use No Oil" is a warning placed on the gauge that may have application in a pressurized gas setup. The most common example being on an oxygen / acetylene gas welding rig. Any of the fittings including the manifold, meters, pressure regulators and connection hoses in such application are always used with clean non-oiled threaded fittings. The reason is ...


2

Most house wiring is 14 gauge. Kitchens are wired using 12 gauge but this only started in the late 2000's. As the entire unit is rated less than 6 amps even if the motor inrush at start up is 100% that still means less than 12 amp total draw. A standard house circuit on a 15 amp breaker usually has 14 awg nmd90 cable, and a 15 amp breaker is rated for 12 ...


2

Technically, extension cords are not meant to be used as permanent wiring. So the proper solution, would be to install a receptacle near where the device will be used. Then plug the unit in to the receptacle, using the factory installed cord. If you want to use an extension cord, do so at your own risk. For a unit that draws less than 5 amperes, a 16 gauge ...


2

You're logicking out that since the lamp can't draw more than 100W, a smaller wire size should suffice. That is covered under the tap rules. Metal conduit is required because the lamp could suffer a fault condition where it pulls too much current for its tap wiring but not enough to trip the breaker. For instance if you had a 14AWG tap off a 125A ...


2

It looks like feeder wire, probably stranded aluminum—though it could be copper. Judging by the scale of the breakers it looks to be AWG 6 or 4. See this chart for ampacity ratings. If you inspect the jacket of the wire for up to 18 inches, you should be able to find some writing which gives the exact wire size (gauge number), temperature rating, ...


2

All I am trying to do is answer your basic question. Simplistically put, the NEC requires electrical conductors to be protected by overcurrent protection that matches the current carrying capacity of said conductor. So in your case you must run a #4 for your 70A breaker. If you are trying to determine a wire size you should be looking for a marking similar ...


2

Every wire-nut manufacturer lists their wire nuts for certain combinations of wires. And UL tests the wirenut for all those combinations. They put a brief summation of the ranges on the box and literature. But if you dig deeper you can find the master sheet listing literally every tested combo. You might, but I doubt, find one listed for seven #14s. ...


2

There is no chance of the entire wire burning up. The wire failed at the terminations. Unscrew the wire from the breaker and furnace, and closely inspect both sets of wire ends, and the screw terminals on which they terminate. You will find either arc damage, or poor workmanship, or both. Also check for any intermediate splices. There is nothing wrong ...


2

With two adjacent regular breakers, you can share the neutral, a multiwire branch circuit. Adjacent breakers are on different legs, so the neutral only carries the difference in current between the two hots due to a cancellation effect. With a tandem breaker, both breakers are on the same leg / line, there is no cancellation effect on the neutral, so you ...


2

You're fine on fill, but not by all that much A 1/2" EMT conduit has 78mm2 of usable fill. Your 10AWG THHNs take up 13.61mm2 apiece, and your 12AWG THHNs take up 8.581mm2 apiece (these numbers are from NEC Chapter 9, Table 5, and hold for both solid and stranded wire), so for your circuits, you are taking up 66.573mm2 of that space with your wires, leaving ...


2

Your plan as written probably doesn't follow code in a couple of places. If you're working with an electrician, you should have them approve your plan. Then you implement the plan, but they check your work. Don't do the work or buy materials until they have reviewed your plan. From a usability standpoint, don't put the ceiling lights on the same circuit as ...


2

If the cable is 12 AWG the max breaker size is 20 amps , if the cable is in ground it should have a gray covering , possibly black that is what almost all the underground cabling has for colors. As using the strippers this is an accurate gauge the smaller size 14awg is noticeably smaller and only rated for 15 amps, the larger size is 10 awg and rated for ...


1

No No No! First, that trick with the 14/3 wire and shared neutrals, is actually one circuit. It is called a multi-wire branch circuit or MWBC. MWBCs have a number of special rules. Top of the hit parade is you can't use a Tandem or double-stuff breaker! The two hots must have 240V voltage between them (be on opposite poles). If so, the neutral wire ...


1

To calculate fill size of different size conductors we have to use Tables 4 and 5 in Chapter 9 of the NEC. Code only allows fill to .122 sq/in and 3 #12 + 3#10 comes to .1032 sq/in if you are using Thhn, Thwn or Thwn-2 type insulation. So from the information you have given us, you are ok to use it. I do caution that just because it says you can I have found ...


1

In short, it is possible. It's not very likely and whether this is actually what happened, it's pretty hard to say for sure without more information. Can you try to further diagnose the current problem by getting yourself a contact voltmeter and testing: voltage at the breaker between phases (black to red) voltage at the breaker between each phase and ...


1

There is no need for (and good reason not to have) a valve between the well and the pressure tank. Turn off the pump power, release pressure, change the gauge. There's no need to hurry. The well is below the tank, with no power to the pump the only way water will even want to flow is back to the well, though if the check valve on the pump is in good shape it ...


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