5

In order to build a gate properly you need the Z/reverse Z frame and build everything around that. How to design your fence properly The key points are the intersections where the 45° lumber meets the horizontal and vertical lumber. You need good solid joints there. The rest is just decorations. For gates that wide I'd still put wheels on just because it'...


4

What has worked for me in the past is grinding the heads off with a Dremel tool and cutoff wheel or any other type of portable grinder.A hack saw might do the trick too. Then pry the posts away from the wall and then grasp the remaining portion of the screw with a pair of vise grips and turning it counterclockwise. Good luck.


3

Instead of hardware cloth that has to buckle and flex to cover the gap, consider a thin stiff material that could be fixed to narrow the gap. I don't know what size of rabbit skulls you're up against but I have to imagine that if you can narrow the gap to under an inch from the 1-3/8 it is now (ie, block off 1/4 inch from each side) then the heads, and the ...


3

I don't think I've ever seen a Simpson product that's intended to hold up a gate post. They're all designed to lift a post up off the concrete, but not to support it laterally. Take it all apart and put a longer post in the ground, like nature intended.


3

No. Those holders give virtually no torsional support. Your gate will tear it right down. Plan on robust posts in a substantial concrete footing to carry that torque load. Either that and do what I did and run some snow fence on a pair of 1/4" vinyl-coated cable. The gate won't contain a toddler, and the snow fence wouldn't either, but it gives a visual ...


2

Any steel post of 3 or 4" (2" if it is a light weight gate) sunk in the ground 3 ft with concrete poured around will hold a steel gate and not bend. However, in my experience the real problem is, depending on your soil type and moisture, the weight will gradually pull the post over. Two solutions: 1) On the hinge side use two posts 4ft apart with cross ...


2

There is always the option to attach a "Wheel" or Roller to the bottom of the gate. The is entirely dependent upon the ground conditions you have. I did this for a vehicle gate at my place. 6' wooden fence, with a 10' wide gate, also wood. Attached a large roller wheel to the gate, and it worked perfectly for years.


2

Not really sure why you’re having trouble finding a source. They’re called electric gate openers and if you have electricity already going to your gate, they’re easy to install. In remote locations, you can get solar powered ones.


2

Eight months later, here is my answer and update: I called the my town's building division and determined the frost line for my region is 48". It wasn't possible for me to dig below 48", so I dug to the frost line and instead of using cement, I filled the hole with pea gravel (roughly three 0.5 cu ft bags), tamped it down with a 2x4, and topped with some ...


2

In the end I hired someone to do the work, and was glad that I did. In order to remove the posts they used: A reciprocating saw to cut the posts off An angle grinder to cut more of the posts off A powered chisel thing to get rid of some of the concrete that was inside the posts A hammer and lots of effort to fold the remaining parts of the posts down Here'...


2

I have a 4' high cedar fence gate with both posts on spikes, no concrete, and it has held up for 20 years with only some minor drooping that needed adjustment. So I imagine adding the concrete will make it better.


1

Squaring the corners In the context of a wood fence "squaring up the corners" means to me to ensure the post is plumb and that it is rotated at the "right" angle to match the fence design. Assuming a post with square cross section, when building a 90 degree corner the post would be rotated so that its faces are perpendicular to the rails ...


1

It's very common where I come from (New Zealand) to Dynabolt the gate or fence post directly to a brick, block or rendered wall. I have about 4 of them in various places around my 1960's render over concrete block house As long as the size of the Dynabolt is appropriate there should be no significant weakening of the brick(s) you drill into. There are ...


1

I would mount the gate with hinges on the 4x4 post on the right. It is structurally sufficient to support the gate. Make it an in-swing right, gate opens into the porch swinging to the right towards the railing. Then all you need is 2x4 latch post attached to the side of the house for the latch. You could attach the latch post with a couple of timber screws. ...


1

It appears the post has a couple straps around it, one of which connects to the top bar of the fence. Try putting a bolt or self-tapping screw through this strap into the post. This way the post will be kept from spinning by being locked into the fence more securely.


1

First off I don't think you're likely to have trouble with a properly set 4x4 post and a 4' wide gate. The 4x4 should be stiff enough, and if the embedment is solid, it shouldn't lean with the weight of the gate. One thing you can do is to make sure the gate is supported on the latch side when it's closed, so the post is only taking the weight of the ...


1

It would seem to me that the 100mm square tube posts would be a bit chincy for holding the hinges for gate of that weight. If it was me I would probably be looking for something a bit beefier like a 5"x5" or a 6"x6" steel tube with a wall thickness of at least 0.25". Gates will place a tremendous torque on the posts and I also have my doubts that a burial ...


1

"keep trimming the everything until it stops binding" That's what worked for me. I had to trim in both summer and winter in the first year after construction. Wooden gates expand and shrink as the seasons change as humidity varies. The other possibility is that your gate is sagging due to inadequate diagonal bracing or poor construction - you could ...


1

First, determine why it is binding: Is it because the wood has swollen due to wet weather, pests, etc.? Is it because the posts surrounding the gate have shifted? Has the ground shifted and moved the posts closer together? My garden gate binds during wet weather. Fortunately, we are much less likely to use the gate then. The posts and gate are set to ...


1

Whoever installed this gate installed a turnbuckle to be able to adjust when the gate sags. All gates will eventually sag. Use a screwdriver for some leverage and insert it in the turnbuckle and turn it. That will raise the gate up and prevent it from sticking.


1

There is a pretty sizeable gap within the hinges themselves. I would definitely swap out those screws for flat head screws (and probably countersink the hinge while I have it off). Then remove as much gap as necessary with adjustment, assuming you can remove enough. That's what the adjustment is for, so that's the best and cheapest fix if there is enough ...


1

The posts for your gate should be embedded in a good concrete base 2 to 3 feet deep. If the gate posts are going to be inside the edges of your walk, then I would install them first. It goes without saying that you should use PT posts and be sure the top of the concrete around the post bevels slightly away from the post so water will run away and not pond ...


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