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40

No inherent problem doing that. I remove gas knobs frequently to clean. But I think a better solution might be to mount a hinged cover across the front of the stove. That would provide protection while making usage easier. If the front is steel, you could even put on a magnetic cover, so no screws or glue needed. Note that if knobs do get damaged, ...


32

As an alternative, you could try a protective cover (usually sold as child proofing, something like this). We installed a similar product with a toddler in the house and they seemed like they'd take some punishment.


20

We talked to a physical therapist about bending the handles of the wheelchair up or down, the physical therapist had a better answer. Slipping 2 short 1" PVC pipes with a 90° angle over the wheelchair handles so that the handle to the oven blocked the wheelchair from scraping against the knobs. Below the knobs is the oven door handle that sticks out ...


10

I've had ranges where I removed the knobs weekly for cleaning but not where I've removed them many times per day. They may wear out. And then she'll just hit the shafts and break those. You could make or buy wooden blocks or wedges (eg door stops) and screw them to the front of the counter on both sides of the stove. They would deflect the chair away from ...


5

Repeatedly removing and reattaching the knobs, especially carelessly, can cause them to wear more quickly where they attach to the stems, which can lead to the knob not pointing to the actual setting. Depending on the design, it could just be a little slack/wiggle in the knob, or it could be entirely pointing at the wrong setting. Also in the case of the gas ...


5

The gas is mixed with air before going to the burner, the slit allows air to enter. The gas does not leak from there becase there is a jet of gas causing a wind current blowing down the tube to the burner.


5

I would be less worried about causing an issue by removal/insertion and would be more worried about the damage caused by the wheelchair running into it. My Kenmore range ($600 from 2016) has very little resistance when removing and re-inserting the knobs so I suspect my chance for a gas leak is very minimal. We have small children and for a few months we had ...


5

Could be a cracked ignitor element, letting through enough current to open the gas valve until it gets even hotter, then the crack widens and the gas valve closes. Could be a faulty valve, and the valve throat is blocked by debris or broken part (as opposed to valve coil is broken). You can distinguish between those cases by reading the voltage across ...


4

Generally speaking it's not necessary. Disconnecting the switch is no different than turning the switch off. Both can create tiny sparks and both leave the fireplace without power. Of course, if you turn off the breaker as you should, sparks are less likely. Either you have an electronic gas valve, in which case it'll remain closed, or you have a pilot flame,...


3

There appears to be insufficient gap and the range appears to be too low. The easiest thing would be to raise the range by 3/4 inch to 1 inch. This might reduce heating of those areas. EDIT Might benefit from a stainless steel gap cover like this https://www.amazon.com/Stainless-Steel-Counter-SILICONE-splatter/dp/B089B6G3XZ Current gap covers appears to be ...


3

While I appreciate the response from A. I. Breveleri, it still left me wondering why exactly the specific behavior I described was happening. I therefore kept digging on the internets until I finally got past all the how-to-fix-it advice to a plausible explanation of how-it-works (and why it doesn't when it doesn't). The key misconceptions I had were [a] ...


3

My KitchenAid (just took it apart for cleaning, so this is fresh in my mind) looks nearly identical (except the oval burner - but instead it has a 2-section round burner) with the empty section underneath, metal part with teeth on top and burner cap on top. Without everything in place you get sparks & gas but not ignition. When I got my current cooktop ...


2

It sounds like the igniter circuit is in parallel any knob turned on fires the circuit. If only one ring sparked in the past the control module may have failed. One of the switches to start the igniter may be stuck with grease and oil or a wire may have shorted causing the problem. Removing the knob and looking for a lever or switch contact may show what ...


2

For most of these possibilities you will need a professional service company to fix. Some possibilities are; The burner tube may be worn out, distorted , or dirty. The delivered gas pressure may be too low. The chimney draft may not be correct for this unit. Is there any thing stored near the boiler that could give off an odor or vapor that could ...


2

I was able to clear the blockage. I considered a number of different cleaners to see what I might use. All of them said don't use on aluminum. The gas line is aluminum. I settled on dawn dish detergent in water. Soaked it overnight from the burner side. Applied compressed air to the valve side of the gas line and it eventually blew out the obstruction.


2

Follow the wire from the button to where it ends, somewhere near the burner. In theory, it will be clipped a specific distance from the burner so that a spark will jump between it and the burner to ignite the gas. In practice, it could be covered with food drippings or could have become detached from where it is supposed to be, or it could be thoroughly ...


2

Check the valve in the bottom 2 pictures that is connected to the pipe that comes up through the floor. That is the manual gas valve that may need to be turned if it is turned off. First, turn the knob marked off, low and high to OFF. Then, in the bottom 2 pictures, that RED knob or button that slants to the left and slightly downward will need to be pushed ...


2

Home gas ovens draw oxygen from room air, and in turn add CO2, some CO, a little SO2 (from impurities and warning smell additive) and perhaps some nitrogen oxides to the room air. An externally vented exhaust hood helps get rid of these combustion products. Most homes are not so air-tight that use of a stove or oven (other than on self-clean cycle) poses an ...


2

Solution was to get a different unit.


2

A 100lb tank? In Winter? In Maine? You are almost certainly overdrawing the tank. Liquified Propane has to boil to provide you with gas, and it takes heat to do that. The pressure in a propane tank is a direct reflection of the temperature of the propane tank, and they will cool to well below ambient temperatures when boiling hard to meet a high gas demand. ...


2

Water Heaters that you can purchase today usually have a warranty from the manufacturer. I think the average warranty is about 6-8 years. You can find ones for 8-12 years, but you will pay much more. You can estimate fairly accurately the life-span of a water heater by looking at the warranty. This is not always true, but it's a good way to get reasonable ...


1

From the pictures in the manual, it looks like there is a flame-out detector next to each burner. If the burner lights OK, but won't stay lit, then the detector may have failed.


1

With the water turned off to standing pilot gas water heaters, I suggest leaving the controller in pilot; that way it can not turn on the burner and damage the tank. This also keeps the pilot running and those pesky little spiders that love to build nests in the tubing away; then, when you return, just turn it to the proper temp: no hassle having to relight ...


1

If you are tightening brass fittings to the point where they seize, you are tightening them way too tight! Propane and natural gas at the stove or oven normally only have approximately 0.75 psi in residential, and 2 psi in commercial in my area. By the time it's being throttled at a Venturi/air mixing point, it's less than that. The only thing that should ...


1

The Solution which DID work When our landlord let us have the heating engineers come round to have a proper look, the engineers discovered the system was clogged with rust and muck. They said it was the worse they had ever seen. The house is as around 20-25 years old, and they believed the system had never been flushed. So the heating engineers did the ...


1

This is an Empire style wall furnace. It does not need electricity. You'll be glad for that later. The twisty valve is designed to completely shut off gas flow if it doesn't feel heat from the pilot light. This is a safety feature designed to keep your apartment from filling with gas and exploding. You will find this kind of safety feature on many ...


1

These are usually flair seals, (metal to metal) no sealing compound is needed if they are and if used can create leaks, the best thing is to get some "gas leak bubble solution) or some soapy water and spray the fitting once pressurized, no bubbles you are good to start grilling.


1

Propane and Butane bottles at least here (Italy) have the exact same bolt-type connector or the vendor-specific 'fast' connector. I suggest you to buy an adjustable regulator : so you can increase or decrease gas pressure upon your needs. To see if pressure is correct just look at the flame, it has to be blue without orange tips, if you see most flames ...


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