7

I have something like this and it works just fine. (I have only one soaker hose in each bed, and both soakers are the same size.) The flow rate involved is very slow, so the hose and connector sizes cause no interference. The pressure will be the same throughout.


4

You haven't specified how long of a run each section is so if you need very fine control of water flow then install a Y-splitter with ball valves at the spigot and run a dedicated hose to each garden bed. This will eliminate the problem of uncontrollable over/under watering. https://www.homedepot.com/p/Melnor-4-Way-Hose-Faucet-Connection-9009/202881087


3

I work in a lumber mill, we see all kinds of things in trees wire and rope do affect the tree the best thing would to use an eye bolt / screw. Drill a pilot hole for the screw and screw it in. This will affect the Cambric layer the least. The wood inside is not the active living part of the tree it is the outside layer. Putting wire or straps around can ...


3

soaker hoses suffer from pressure drop, and running a long garden hose between two sections is going to make that worse. You might consider running a 3/8 plastic pipe/non-drip feeder to the left side of bed 1, then run a Y connector, and connect the soaker hose for bed 1 and the garden hose/soaker hose for bed 2. This would eliminate the un-evenness you'll ...


3

The anti-siphon part on top is broken. You need to determine the brand and purchase the replacement part for the anti-siphon. The brand can be seen here. Take a photo of the brand here. For the similiar style shown in my comment earlier, a replacement part is sold. If your faucet is a PRIER or Mansfield, this is the part needed. You would order a ...


2

It looks like something that used to be done for pool niche lights or landscaped fountains and ponds. This was a non-conducting waterproofing gel that was used to prevent corrosion and power leakage in wet location areas. It was usually applied in a time, post new GFCI and grounding requirements. I haven't seen it used in quite a while. If you are trying ...


2

I will line up all the posts, measure, mark, pre-drill, and screw in all the brackets before the posts ever go into the ground. What if you can't drive one all the way to your predicted depth, or what if you drive one your predicted depth and it is not yet stable and you want to drive it further? I would not pre-attach your rail brackets or I bet they will ...


2

I think you should take off for the outside faucet from the 3/4" PEX. This will have a lesser effect on the water pressure inside the house than taking off on the 1/2" line that goes to the kitchen. You can always throttle back at the outside faucet if you need to. EDIT You could run a 1/2" line to the outside faucet, split off from the 3/4&...


2

You cannot siphon water uphill. If two reservoirs A and B are connected by a siphon hose, water will flow from the reservoir whose surface is higher to the one whose surface is lower.


1

You can “pump” water uphill without using electricity - use a hydraulic ram pump or water hammer pump. Also some call it a clapper pump, as it tends to make a noise... All you need is flowing water but you may need to concern yourself with the delivery volume compared to the volume needed to drive it. However, there are many easily found resources explaining ...


1

That's not going to get you very far with actually pumping water uphill. It can get a drain/hose started -- like an aquarium siphon kit -- but if you need the water to exit the hose at a level above the water level within the barrel, a better solution would be an inexpensive submersible pump. You can find submersible pumps of varying sizes at major home ...


1

One way is to place 2*1 around the branch or trunk then secure those with 2” webbing straps. Seen this used on trees where those climbing or aerial runways are used. Works for platforms, securing cables etc so should hold a bird cage. Not 2*1 but shows exactly what I explained:


1

Pressure loss in a pipe is proportional to the flow through the pipe. A garden hose has potential for high flow, meaning higher pressure loss in the pipe, and you mention that the system pressure is already "not that great." I can think of two reasons not to use a larger-than-necessary pipe: when it simply costs too much to use the oversize pipe (...


1

1/2" is fine for individual fixtures such as sinks and dishwashers, but high flow fancy showers should be 3/4" Also, your trunk line should have been 3/4". It also depends upon the water pressure supplied by your utility or well. If it's high enough, you can "get by" with 1/2" but bigger is usually better. The only ...


1

More specifically, it's a good idea to avoid placing your shed at the bottom of a slope. Doing so can lead to moisture collecting under or around your shed; which can be a major irritation in the short term, but can also damage your shed, the base of your shed, and/or its contents in the long term.


1

It either should be dug in or supported on the low end or a little of both. You could perhaps let it slope a little if you have to, but it will not let the door or doors act properly after a while. Besides it would look pretty hokey, but that's just my opinion...(insert smiley face here)


1

This is possibly a daft question, but just to be sure - you are unscrewing the "nut" that is on the right side of that picture, sliding that over the hose, pushing the hose under the "fingers", and then doing the nut back up? If so, and you're sure that that hose and fitting are the same size, then try putting the end of the hose in a bucket of hot water ...


1

I’d suggest burying the posts deeper than 1ft I’d say at least 14” (1/3 post depth) Maybe put one in and feel the resistance by hand to see if it works for the strength you are looking for.


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