20

Your best bet would be to get some 1/2" PVC Couplings with threaded port and some Misting Nozzles. You should be able to find them both online, or at your local landscaping/gardening center. This setup would allow you to get the desired spray pattern, by selecting the appropriate nozzles.


15

That is not a standard garden hose fitting. Instead it looks to be part of a anti-siphon adapter where the other part was unscrewed to reveal the inner section of the unit. The regular hose thread coupling would have been on the down stream part of the missing part. It will be unlikely that you can find just half of a anti-siphon adapter that would screw on ...


10

I have played with various fire pit options in my backyard for 15 years. I have tons and tons of trees and yard waste and try to burn most or turn it into compost. I have grabbed the saucers from trash piles and used those - can't put much on there and wind blows stuff off easy. I have had an enclosed mini-chimney pit I built from stones. This worked ...


9

The internal bowl/barrel of an old washing machine works well for an above-ground solution - the holes around the sides allow the embers to breathe well and help to radiate heat. You can add legs as this person has, or simply prop it up on a slab or some bricks. Just make sure that it IS metal - a lot of the newer/cheaper washing machines use plastic ...


8

As long as the attached timer is shut off and no water is flowing the pressure in the water line will be no different than what it would be when the spigot is turned off. You water bill will reflect how much water that you actually use. The only way it could go up astronomically would be if the timer broke off the spigot or failed in an open mode where ...


8

They are probably additional clean-out-points - my local inspector wants one every 50 feet (15 meters) along the line. But my comment that you should ask the people who put them in, who would know, stands as the correct way to figure that out. If so, they should remain accessible, but be protected from sunlight, as they appear to be PVC. You can paint them ...


7

I haven't tried this, so no idea if it'd work, but one thought would be to find a needle and a torch. Get the needle as hot as you can and then poke it into the PVC to melt a tiny hole.


6

Thanks to Tyson's comments above and some reading online I figured out how to repair the pipe and even better...no leaks! Turns out the pipe is a 20 mm MDPE pipe so it could be repaired by putting a joint in the pipe. This was done by cutting the pipe and trimming off the pierced section, then putting pipe inserts into either end of the pipe. It could then ...


5

That looks like a very flimsy coupling, as it barely has anything to hang on to. Better to use a regular PVC barbed coupling, which looks like this: Usually you use a stainless steel clamp around the connections: With bigger/thicker pipe, you sometimes need to heat the pipe using a torch slightly -- just get it a bit pliable so you can get the fitting in, ...


4

Although I'm not convinced a round hole of any size will give you the misting pattern you are looking for, micro-sized drill bits and an accompanying hand tool (pin-vise) are actually not that expensive, and will last you a long time (if not abused ;) ). For ~$20 you can get a pin-vise and micro bits from many hobby shops (real or on-line). Alternatively,...


4

You have two choices depending on whether you have continuous areas of plants to water or discrete plants to water. For the latter, you would use drip emitters, bubblers or misters like these: http://www.rainbird.com/landscape/products/dripEmission/XeriBugEmitters.htm http://www.rainbird.com/landscape/products/dripEmission/XeriBubblers.htm http://www....


4

hey we just bought end of propane tank at flea market which we will set on cut in half 55 gal drum


4

You can shape a bowl out of steel sheet with only three cheap tools: Steel snippers (for cutting a circle), approx $15. Ball nose hammer (hit it until it becomes a bowl), approx $10. Piece of wood (to place below the sheet while hammering), available free anywhere. I would say it will take around 20-50 hours of work to make a 50 cm diameter bowl this way. ...


4

Find a scrap tire rim, and place it on top of four or five bricks. Voila: one excellent firepit.


3

If you see any charcoal grill should work. Just use the bottom and you can cut the legs to height. If you get the right paint you can paint it or build your "pit" to suit the shape of the grill bottom. Recycle the top or even keep it to snuff out your fires.


3

When drip irrigation connectors leak, it is usually because the hole that was punched into the 1/2" hose is too large. This can happen when you try to re-punch the hole because the 1st punch did not go all the through and you can't get your connector into the line. When you try to re-punch a hole it's extremely hard to get the punch in exactly the same ...


3

Grade looks good to me. The ground level should drop 6" within 10' of the house. From the pic, it looks like you have this covered. If I'm right about the grade being correct, then the water in your basement isn't going to be solved by grading, BC grade isn't the problem. Give your rain gutters an overhaul. Make sure they're all dumping water a good ...


3

The only feasible way to recycle the drainage water from the tray without an additional pump is to place the tray at a level above the top of the reservior and let the water flow by force of gravity back into the tank.


3

Rather than removing it, I would suggest covering it properly with greenhouse film (translucent plastic, UV-protected with typically 4 year guaranteed lifespan, typically 11-13 cents per square foot) rather than a blue tarp. With proper edge attachments it will be much more secure and weather tight, and far less unsightly as well. You could also use (at ...


3

I wouldn't risk connecting the rain barrel to your house's plumbing because you don't want to risk getting non-potable water into your pipes. This sort of arrangement might even be illegal where you live. What if, instead, you just use a garden hose to add more water to the barrel as needed? Then you don't need to worry about running out. Or, use a quick ...


3

There's really not much that can fail in a setup like that if you use quality components. A hose bib on a post or standpipe used to be a common sight in gardens before underground irrigation became so common. Even with old rubber hoses disaster rarely struck. Modern reinforced hoses make failure a very remote possibility that shouldn't dissuade you from ...


2

Since you don't mention it, you have probably left out the pressure regulator. The pressure tolerance of drip systems is pretty low. Ideally they like to run around 25-30 PSI. Most homes have 50 PSI or more. In my case, it's 120 PSI. You should also consider getting a filter at the same time you get the pressure regulator.


2

Wood will likely rot over time exposed to the higher humidity of a greenhouse. I'd also stay away from treated lumber, I'd be afraid of it leaching unwanted chemicals into the soil, especially is you are eating products planted in it. It might be OK if you keep away from direct ground contact, e.g. with a concrete apron, but it's not what I'd use. Ideally ...


2

I came up with this in about an hour with stuff laying around my blacksmiths shop. Just happened to have a firebowl from a storebought pit. The tripod is made of 1/2" hot rolled square and the hangars are 1/4" sq. All in all probably 15 bucks worth of metal. Super easy to make and super portable as well, as it can be taken apart and hangs flat on a hook on a ...


2

I know this thread is old but I found it because I'm having the same issue. I wanted to share what I found for a solution. Hope this helps anyone else out there. https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00M16DANU


2

As requested: That far away I cant see any problem. Your soil had to be stable enough to put the basement in. I would not even worry about a monolith that far away.


2

In typical UK homes, critical infrastructure, like electrical power, gas, water and sewage should be deep enough that there is no danger of hitting it with a garden fork from the surface. About two or three feet would be typical I believe. You can check the depth of your sewer pipes at the manhole located near your home. For example, according to Anglian ...


2

You haven't given yourself a mechanical advantage here. If you attach a pulley to the bucket, then bring the line back up, you will only need to pull half as hard (but the operation will require more rope of course). Yes, reduce friction at the top with a pulley as well, if you can. Picture stolen shamelessly from the internet


1

If you really want to "make it, not buy it" and you can't shape metal, castable refractory or fireclay are the materials that come to mind - otherwise you're just buying something (but not called a firepit) and plonking it down as a firepit (IMHO.) Clay oven (for baking bread) builders might be a better-than usual source of info on using the material. ...


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