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It appears that my problem is caused by incorrect plumbing, similar to Help with Garbage Disposal install and high drain pipe Apparently previous owners (long time ago) installed a deeper sink, but forgot to lower the outlet pipe. There is no easy fix for that. See also Drain and disposal outlet same height? and What is the minimum height for garbage ...


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You need a wye or diverted where the garbage disposal wasteline connects into the adjacent sinks wasteline. https://www.acehardware.com/departments/plumbing/pipe-fittings/plastic-fittings/42623?x429=true&gclid=CjwKCAjwguzzBRBiEiwAgU0FT1x7zinDNbgiAB8UkJBAUYCBdMDt0umsWu7Ta73l136PILx4010ZuxoCgpUQAvD_BwE&gclsrc=aw.ds If you look closely, you’ll see ...


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OK, If you have to remove the copper piping, start with the trap, the "u" thing, which you need to re install with the new piping. Turn the two brass nuts counterclockwise to remove them from the down pipe and the main drain. The threaded fitting at the wall should be able to be removed by turning it counterclockwise with a 12 or 14" pipe wrench. The ...


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There's a good chance the disposal was larger than needed for your house hold. Three people households will do great with a 1/3 to 1/2 HP disposal. larger the 5 people would use the higher RPM and HP. Those high RPM models need to have a lot of stuff in them before turning them on. I've always had In-Sink-Erator disposals, 1/3 to 1/2 HP and have never had ...


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It has been my experience that when a disposer body is made of die cast aluminum corrosion of the type showing in your picture means that the metal has been eaten away over time. When it gets to the state showing it is highly unlikely that it will be repairable with just a new gasket/retainer. One point I would like to make is that now might not be a good ...


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There is an awful lot of corrosion where the down pipe connects to the disposal. Remove the nut on top and remove the retaining bracket. Loosen the brass nut at the end of the pipe and swivel the pipe out of the way. Now examine the disposal to determine if the recessed area of the disposal is rusted beyond repair or if cleaning it out and getting a new ...


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This is a fairly easy repair to make. You didn't say if it's working but I'm assuming it is and it's not jammed. First unplug the disposal. You could have a blockage in there so make sure that there isn't standing water in the disposal. It's possible that the screw is just loose but I would put a bucket under the disposal and remove the top screw over the ...


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I'll try to answer your questions as stated. Minimum height difference I'm not sure if there is a code for this, but it's good practice to have the bottom of the disposal drain higher than the top of the drain into the wall. So a height difference of at least one pipe-width. But, as long as the bottom of your tailpiece is higher than the wall drain, the ...


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With your clarification that the disposal drain is slightly above the drain everything is ok. The p trap snaking around is quite common and a bit of a necessity here. The dish washer pumps to the upper section providing an air space, So although it looks funny it is fine on all counts, Could it be better Sure but I doubt you want the wall opened up and ...


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No, combining the ground will not render the GFCI useless. Just imagine for a minute any metal j-box, or any metal stud construction building, all those grounds become interconnected through the yokes of the receptacles. A GFCI receptacle doesn't use the ground to function, it is required to be grounded if a ground is present, but notice if you look at the ...


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It's the neutrals you need to firewall GFCI and DFCI devices simply do not care about ground. (Note how a GFCI breaker has no ground connection -- it has line-hot, line-neutral, load-hot, and load-neutral, and that's all!) In fact, one could pull two hots and two neutrals through an EMT conduit to a metal box, thus having a single ground path all the way ...


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