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Re-wire the outlet so the top one is on the switch instead of the bottom one. Is this even possible, and if so, considering I've never done it before and it's under the kitchen sink without much room, how hard would this be? This should be very straightforward. There are actually two different configurations possible. Find the one or two breakers and turn ...


5

Your best bet would be to rewire the outlet. It's an easy job. the hardest part is getting into position and cleaning out under the sink. Find the two breakers in your main panel that feed the dishwasher and disposal and turn them off. Remove the cover plate and then the screws that attach the outlet to the box. Pull out the outlet and locate the brass ...


4

I'll try to answer your questions as stated. Minimum height difference I'm not sure if there is a code for this, but it's good practice to have the bottom of the disposal drain higher than the top of the drain into the wall. So a height difference of at least one pipe-width. But, as long as the bottom of your tailpiece is higher than the wall drain, the ...


3

The outlet tester shows no lights, because there is no power until you reset the GFCI. A GFCI can trip because there is a ground fault or because the GFCI itself is bad. Most of the time, it is an actual ground fault - a life-safety condition. Consider the different possibilities: The disposal has a fault which only appears after an extended period of time. ...


3

One non-invasive option for problematic right-angle cables is a rotating plug adapter like this one. You could leave your outlet wired as-is, and the adapter would let you rotate the cable out of the way. Make sure the one you get is rated appropriately for the load. Probably not a long-term solution but as far as quick fixes go, it's more convenient than ...


3

It's the neutrals you need to firewall GFCI and DFCI devices simply do not care about ground. (Note how a GFCI breaker has no ground connection -- it has line-hot, line-neutral, load-hot, and load-neutral, and that's all!) In fact, one could pull two hots and two neutrals through an EMT conduit to a metal box, thus having a single ground path all the way ...


2

I do not think you did it correctly but I will explain. Connecting the GFCI without a switch all sounded good. But you then put the switch on the white or neutral if I understood your question. The proper wiring would be the “splice” to the switch if a piece of Romex is on the hot to the outlet , you remove the black line feeding the outlet connect that ...


2

You probably didn't hurt the garbage disposal, but you probably tripped the circuit breaker in your electrical panel. You may have also fried the switch for the disposal, or any outlets, cords or wires between the disposal and the breaker.


2

This should be fine* There is not a restriction that a disposal must be on a dedicated circuit unless the manufacturer states that it must be. Unless you have a high-end beast of a commercial unit, it probably doesn't. There are rules in the NEC on circuit sharing, and a "fixed" device like a disposal or dishwasher can't use any more than 50% of the ...


2

You will probably find the right side easier to plumb as there is just more space. Disposals have sort of a weird offset discharge pipe that isn't just a drop in replacement for the existing extension pipe. As you noted the dishwasher piping already runs to the right as well, and that is generally connected to the disposal.


2

This is a fairly easy repair to make. You didn't say if it's working but I'm assuming it is and it's not jammed. First unplug the disposal. You could have a blockage in there so make sure that there isn't standing water in the disposal. It's possible that the screw is just loose but I would put a bucket under the disposal and remove the top screw over the ...


2

Try inserting a broom stick into the disposal and try to pry the round plate connected to the motor..... this will give you more leverage that the Allen wrench.


1

This is up to code even today with GFCI protection. I would locate the receptacles on the sink side so the dishwasher can be plugged in there through a hole in the cabinet as Jim Stewart commented and this would pass inspection unless there are some local code restrictions above and beyond the NEC. You could do it with a deep single gang and break the tabs ...


1

Assuming that there is no other electric device connected to that GFCI - also not via a downstream/"load" outlet: There might be a safety issue with that disposal, so taking care of the danger of electricity is mandatory. Connecting the disposal to another GFCI outlet via an extension cable could disclose whether the disposal or the GFCI is defect. The ...


1

You should be using a baffle tee to connect the disposer drain to the other sink outlet, prior to the trap. This will require significant alteration of the existing setup, but will fix your problem.


1

OK, If you have to remove the copper piping, start with the trap, the "u" thing, which you need to re install with the new piping. Turn the two brass nuts counterclockwise to remove them from the down pipe and the main drain. The threaded fitting at the wall should be able to be removed by turning it counterclockwise with a 12 or 14" pipe wrench. The ...


1

It appears that my problem is caused by incorrect plumbing, similar to Help with Garbage Disposal install and high drain pipe Apparently previous owners (long time ago) installed a deeper sink, but forgot to lower the outlet pipe. There is no easy fix for that. See also Drain and disposal outlet same height? and What is the minimum height for garbage ...


1

There's a good chance the disposal was larger than needed for your house hold. Three people households will do great with a 1/3 to 1/2 HP disposal. larger the 5 people would use the higher RPM and HP. Those high RPM models need to have a lot of stuff in them before turning them on. I've always had In-Sink-Erator disposals, 1/3 to 1/2 HP and have never had ...


1

It has been my experience that when a disposer body is made of die cast aluminum corrosion of the type showing in your picture means that the metal has been eaten away over time. When it gets to the state showing it is highly unlikely that it will be repairable with just a new gasket/retainer. One point I would like to make is that now might not be a good ...


1

There is an awful lot of corrosion where the down pipe connects to the disposal. Remove the nut on top and remove the retaining bracket. Loosen the brass nut at the end of the pipe and swivel the pipe out of the way. Now examine the disposal to determine if the recessed area of the disposal is rusted beyond repair or if cleaning it out and getting a new ...


1

No, combining the ground will not render the GFCI useless. Just imagine for a minute any metal j-box, or any metal stud construction building, all those grounds become interconnected through the yokes of the receptacles. A GFCI receptacle doesn't use the ground to function, it is required to be grounded if a ground is present, but notice if you look at the ...


1

Expanding on the comments here. 1) determine whether your dishwasher is on the same circuit. Turn breakers off & see what happens with each breaker, i.e. does the outlet stay live while the dishwasher goes down? 2) look up the amperage drawn by the dispos-all and any other items (dishwasher or anything else that share that breaker. Compare with ...


1

I would get a good flashlight and shine it bright down in there and have a little better look. Look closely, sometimes we can be surprised as to what we might find. It only makes the "same" noise as you described if there's something still in there.


1

Depending upon the problem and / or age, attempting to rotate the drum is the very best way to get it working again. If you let it "hum" long enough, it will trip the overload in the unit and you'd have to reset it. Kudos to you for not going that route. Use a stout piece of wood, maybe like 3 ft long, like a plunger handle to move it. If that does not ...


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