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Re-wire the outlet so the top one is on the switch instead of the bottom one. Is this even possible, and if so, considering I've never done it before and it's under the kitchen sink without much room, how hard would this be? This should be very straightforward. There are actually two different configurations possible. Find the one or two breakers and turn ...


5

Your best bet would be to rewire the outlet. It's an easy job. the hardest part is getting into position and cleaning out under the sink. Find the two breakers in your main panel that feed the dishwasher and disposal and turn them off. Remove the cover plate and then the screws that attach the outlet to the box. Pull out the outlet and locate the brass ...


3

The outlet tester shows no lights, because there is no power until you reset the GFCI. A GFCI can trip because there is a ground fault or because the GFCI itself is bad. Most of the time, it is an actual ground fault - a life-safety condition. Consider the different possibilities: The disposal has a fault which only appears after an extended period of time. ...


3

One non-invasive option for problematic right-angle cables is a rotating plug adapter like this one. You could leave your outlet wired as-is, and the adapter would let you rotate the cable out of the way. Make sure the one you get is rated appropriately for the load. Probably not a long-term solution but as far as quick fixes go, it's more convenient than ...


1

This is up to code even today with GFCI protection. I would locate the receptacles on the sink side so the dishwasher can be plugged in there through a hole in the cabinet as Jim Stewart commented and this would pass inspection unless there are some local code restrictions above and beyond the NEC. You could do it with a deep single gang and break the tabs ...


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