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Oh no! Send that panel back. The dead giveaway is that they threw an accessory ground bar in the box for you. (and it's HOM, which is notoriously cheap, which means they wouldn't give you a ground screw let alone a ground bar unless UL was holding a gun to their head). The need for an accessory ground bar is because it's a main lug panel which means it's ...


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In your main panel there's a fat bus bar down the left side. It has a lug up high and another at the bottom (hidden from view behind some wires). Those lugs should accommodate your neutral and ground wires. Unfortunately... you've kinda got the wrong panel for the detached garage. There's a requirement that all circuits in the building can be shut down with ...


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Since you are connecting the feed from the sub-panel to the main panel, it really doesn't make any difference where you connect the neutral and ground, since they are bonded (connected) in the main panel. Still I like to separate the neutral from the ground, just in case the main panel becomes a sub-panel at some point (Like installation of a generator ...


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THHN in EMT is generally less expensive than MC, and much more capable as well (i.e. MC is what it is - cable, 12/2 or 12/3 or whatever, while 1/2" EMT can support up to 4 circuits on 12 or 14 gauge (more wires than that on 14 gauge but you run into derating issues which make sticking to 4 the safer bet for planning.) If your needs are simple and you ...


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If you can drill straight through to run longer chunks (or if not able to, a bunch of shorter chunks, and couplers, and perhaps slightly oversized holes in some studs to facilitate getting them in) you can just run the conduit in a straight line at the elevation you want the boxes at, and run straight into the sides of the boxes, rather than using a bunch of ...


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After some further investigation (i.e. removing a bit more drywall), I've discovered the reason the drywall was hung this way. It turns out portion of the wall is framed with studs, however another portion is CMU block. The CMU portion of the wall has furring strips to keep the drywall off the block. Therefore, the remaining portion of the wall needed to ...


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The principle at work here is basically this: condensation, or dew, forms when humid air is exposed to a cold surface. More specifically, it forms on a surface when the temperature of the surface is below the dew point of the air. It's the same thing that happens when droplets form on the outside of a glass holding an ice-cold beverage. One way to prevent ...


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Why not just rip the 1/2" OSB into 1-1/2 wide strips to use as shims, and attach them to the edge of the wall studs?


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They do make them. Few companies do. Miller Edge, Igazeb35, Banner engineering. Most are made for commercial purposes. They are "monitored" so the system always knows if they are working or not. If they are dead or not working the door will not close.


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Clean the floor. Wet Warehouse Floors in Atlanta – southeastsealing.com/wet-concrete-floors As this moisture vapor migrates to the surface of the concrete floor it carries with it mineral salts and other impurities within the concrete slab. When the moisture evaporates, the impurities are left on the surface and result in a white colored residue known as ...


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You have this on lifehacks and not DIY,SE so if you want a simple and low cost hack, try leaving the door open. This will create airflow which should help stop/reduce the condensation. Downside is that leaves, snow, stray cats, burglers, lost children, birds, bugs, litter/garbage, dust, dirt, and confused moths could all end up inside your garage over time. ...


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The type of coating like this should need extra work for preparing it. The cracks : Mainly the cause of cracks comes from moisture (Water) and oil spilled on your floor. This moisture if you just spray the coating on it it will make your coating have microbubbles and leaving you with cracks. Or the concrete/floor is not porous as stated in the product ...


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You would do far better to put your access horizontally from the second floor of the house into the space above the garage. I honestly figured with so many double beams stretching across the garage, Cutting a single one couldn't possibly have any effect on the overall structure If they were not needed for the design, they would not be there.


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