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You could install empty junction boxes at strategic locations and conduit between them Unused boxes are allowed to be buried, but if you start using them you'll need regular exposed face plates.


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You could add access panels in the most useful places. Where the wall is above, anywhere a cable turns to go up the wall would be a valid spot for an access hatch. For a run of cable across to a ceiling fixture, you could put the cable run below the ceiling, or have an access every second space/joist. No idea if this satisfies your code requirements, sorry ...


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It still may not meet code but there are suspended ceiling systems where the drop in panels are firecode sheetrock with various textures on the surface. The link has one source, but with that you can get the idea, there are more kinds out there.


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Insulation is basically pay now or pay continuously (assuming you are heating and/or cooling the space enclosed - if the garage is unconditioned, a bit of insulation will limit condensation from rapid temperature swings, but you don't need a lot for that.) I don't make any claim that the HD advice is correct for anything but HD selling more insulation, but ...


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Home depot is telling you recommendations for conditioned space. Assuming you are not familiar with finding/interpreting building codes: You will need to call your local building department and ask them what the minimum code requirement for insulation is at the exterior walls of your garage (it's going to likely be "no insulation is required at your ...


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You can eliminate two 90 degrees bents by doing one of the two shown below. For option A, leave a clear distance of 1" - 2" between the bottom of the pipe and the foundation. For option B, the clear cover on the top of the pipe should be at least 2". Also, using your configuration, I think it is possible to pull the wire through multiple ...


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Wow -- that's a very substantial footing. First thing I'd look into is whether it'll be allowable to cut or break a notch in the footing. Doing so could allow the pair of 90's in the middle of the drawing to be replaced by 45's. Another option is an in-ground pull box. You see them all around in the urban/suburban landscape -- the smallest options are the ...


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This Practical Machinist forum post by Lakeside53 says the following: Look in the Quincy manual (you can get it online). The oil you use depends of the temperature. If your compressor is "inside" and/or not subject to freezing, Quincy recommends 30 SAE (ISO 100) non-detergent hydraulic oil. Outside low temperatures -down as low as 10 SAE. I need ...


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The curbing should not be removed. It is typically an integral part of the wall foundation structure and may even have rebar embedded in the part that you think that you want to remove. The curbing is almost always installed as part of the foundation wall before the floor is ever poured. The width of the curbing is typically equal to the "thickness"...


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It's all math. You need 1 ton (12,000 btus) of cooling per 400 square feet. You need about 500-600 btus of cooling per person. So in 400 square feet you can expect to cool up to 20 people per ton assuming they aren't actively exercising. I wouldn't do any more than 10 people per ton if you want them to feel at least a little chill. A hot and uninsulated ...


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