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I'm no garage door expert, but it looks like it might be technically possible to convert from your linear spring arrangement to a torsion spring setup. The torsion sprung systems usually place the cable between the track and the wall, so it's a very compact way of arranging the parts. A different style of bottom track roller bracket would be required, though,...


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Just screw that two-by vertically on the wall, or mount the bracket directly to the wall. That's why that bracket is adjustable, so that you can extend it out in front of the track so it can see the corresponding sensor. Like this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fd25t6i72XU


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Cat walk or rat walk is what we called them. We usually laid them flat and would staple the romex. They keep the boards from moving and cracking the Sheetrock, since you are decking the area make sure to do the same with the decking or as you move around it will damage the Sheetrock.


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White in the original switch may have been part of a switch leg not a neutral that your new switch needs, on the new switch I believe you need a neutral if there are several whites in the box tied together that is usually the neutral but a single white may actually be a hot, the hot normally a black in the box but could be a white if s switch leg goes to ...


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Well, you're halfway there, and kudos on you for not blindly experimenting as many will tend to. (this can lead to configurations which "work" but will kill you). I can tell you what is definitely correct: Green to your ground wires. White to your actual neutral wires, and your all-white bundle appears to be both neutral and also neutral for these ...


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The pulley you wish to move is there for a purpose, to allow the door to open as high as possible for THAT track. If you change it, it will not work as well. You can get rollers, pulleys and tension springs at some hardware stores, but I have never seen track to be sold separately. For what its worth, the sensor does not have to be mounted on a 2X4 on the ...


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If the concrete brick block floor is dry you might be able to put a floating floor on it a nice thick pad for insulation the floor needs to be flat. There are many different brands and many snap together, one of the first of these I did back in 2000 is still in good shape and we have had 3 dogs. The walls could be covered with furring strips and Sheetrock ...


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I have a Kenmore side by side circa 1997 or so in my garage. I put it in the garage when I got a new one for the house. I then found out it didn't work properly because it's not designed to work below an ambient temperature of 60 degrees F. Sheesh! My garage is insulated and in the winter maintains a temp of around 50 degrees. I live in the mountains in ...


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Looks like 2 X 6 on 48" centers , primarily they hold the walls from bowing out, not for supporting weight. I suggest what I did for the same construction : add 2 X 6 between so it will be 24" centers. That will hold modest weight like your wheels .


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There is very little bracing under the loft floor. It may need to be framed in more to support the weight of stored items. Tires are not that heavy, but you definitely want it to be strong enough to carry the weight of a person safely. Objects falling from that height could definitely result in personal injury, or even death. If you are unsure how to ...


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However, I have no idea how to select a placement. Why would I choose ceiling mount vs wall mount? Like is there an "ideal" place to mount the fan? If wall mounted - high or low on the wall? Near a corner or in the middle of the wall? If ceiling mounted, near the center of the room? Corners? Wall centers? The fans you've referenced are fundamentally the ...


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