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TLDR: 1-part epoxy is fake. Use 2-part epoxy if able, and traction modifier additives. 2-part epoxy floor paint is really excellent stuff (if the prep is good). What is epoxy, really? First, go down to the hardware store and look at all the varieties of epoxy glue for sale. Every speed you want, a variety of styles. Notice this is all 2-part epoxy. ...


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I added granules to epoxy paint for grip on floor surfaces, ok we were dealing with a large factory floor not just a few squate metres...


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The source of the problem is that's an uninsulated duct running in unconditioned space (the garage). Every time your AC kicks in, the cold air cools the metal which then condenses the humidity in the garage. That humidity runs down the duct as water and soaks into the drywall causing the damage you're seeing. The fix will involve: removing the duct ...


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Based on my experience (I am not a licensed electrician), I think everything you did is OK. Key was to replace the 20 A breaker with a 15 A breaker. Only other thing you might want to do is to make a note in the circuit breaker panel to the effect that "Circuit [put the number of you circuit breaker here] feeds #14 wiring", or something similar, so that ...


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Your friend gave you good advice. Breakers are sized by the smallest wire in the circuit. Since you added 14/2 to the circuit, a 15 AMP breaker is the maximum allowed. Replacing the receptacle was needed too. The 14/2 you installed is fine since you replaced the breaker.


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You need to get the oil off and out before adding a self-leveling coating, or it will tend to separate from the floor at the oily interface. Off is relatively easy (soap/detergent, or use chemistry to turn the oil to soap (saponify) with a base.) Out is considerably harder, since oil will be soaked into the concrete like a sponge. But at least start with ...


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If you want a well-performing coating, you must do surface preparation according to instructions. There aren't really any shortcuts around that. Oil is a contaminant that will fail almost any coating, and most definitely a water-based coating. If you're new to surface preparation, I'm sorry if it throws a monkeywrench into what you hoped would be an ...


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This sounds like you may not have completed the programming successfully. Usually both remotes, old and new, need to be programmed together and you cannot just add one. So the fact that one remote has continued to work gives the indication that the programming did not complete. I suggest you check the instructions are correct for the unit and try again.


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The Code requires a live load of 20 lbs. per square foot for limited attic storage and 30 lbs. per square foot for attic storage with fixed stairs. (See IRC Table 301.5) Limited storage is defined as an attic space that has trusses. (See Table 301.5, footnote ā€œgā€.) I doubt that is your condition. Therefore, you need to design to 30 lbs. per square foot, ...


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You're residential so your storage loads should be 40 psf to match the interior floor live load. For the dead load, lets assume 5 psf and 11' 6" true span from inside of wall to inside of wall with floor joists bearing on top. Yes, the tables are correct, you would need a 2x8 at 16" oc. This is for Hem-fir #2 graded lumber. The good news - You have other ...


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The best way to fix this would be to drill the existing holes through the door out the front. Then get some bolts, washers and nuts. Put the bolts and washers from the outside in through the door. Mount the arm to the bolts, then washers and finish off with nuts. Tighten and you're good to go. Oh, and disable the sliding lock. Good luck and stay safe out ...


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