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15

People were using them to secure things or hang things on. They serve no purpose. I would just pull them out since hammering them in probably will not be that easy. You might want to get a small board to press against so you do no damage drywall. Also FYI I do not think the drywall that is currently on there is going to take pain - even primer - that well....


15

It is bad, more than a few violations here if I understand what is being fed. First violation no clamps /bushings coming into the panel 2 places. Next a 40 amp breaker feeding #12 possibly 14 awg wire 4 places 4 ground wires under 1 lug (I believe square D limits grounds to 2 wires) The neutral and ground issue would have been legal prior to 1999 If the ...


9

WD-40 is NOT a lubricant. In fact it will dissolve and wash away any lubricant that was there to begin with. If you think the problem is lack of lubrication, white lithium grease or similar is a good choice. There is a WD-40 branded white lithium spray that is quite convenient but there are other brands as well. As far as whether your hinges and rollers ...


9

Buried conduit is considered wet location. Romex typically refers to NM cable, which isn't approved for wet location. Depending on conduit size you might be able to run 6/3 UF if you can find in quad (not flat) form, but it could be very hard to pull. Also 6/3 costs about $2.50/ft, you would be better running 3@ #6 THWN at 0.54/ft and #10 ground @ 0.40/ft. (...


8

They look like nails used as simple hangers. The ones in the corners are clearly driven into studs. These can be removed without issue.


8

The requirements for GFCI protection are in NEC 210.8(a): 210.8 Ground-Fault Circuit-Interrupter Protection for Personnel. Ground-fault circuit-interrupter protection for personnel shall be provided as required in 210.8(A) through (E). The ground-fault circuit interrupter shall be installed in a readily accessible location. and (A) tells you that ...


8

"Romex" (brand name) is usually used to refer to NM/B cable, which cannot be run in conduit that runs outdoors. It its not rated for wet locations, and all exterior conduits are wet by definition and in reality. It's also a huge pain and requires huge conduit to run the UF cable (similar to NM/B, but waterproof, with a gray jacket, typically) in ...


8

Yes, your trusses will support insulation and gypsum board. The Building Code requires the bottom chord of trusses and ceiling joists to support a minimum of 10 lbs. per square foot. (See IRC Table R301.5) Gypsum board weighs about 3 lbs. per square foot and insulation (depending on the thickness and type) weighs between .3 and .5 lbs. per square foot per ...


8

Looking at your drawing. There would not be a code reason that prevents you from putting your panel at that location, but there may be a practical reason. You are putting in a 2'8" door which is probably prehung, so that would be about 2'11" or even 3' of space in the wall. Then you will have at least a double stud around it, and you may have the ...


7

Use GFCI switches You seem to be assuming that the only kind of GFCI available is a receptacle. They actually come in several other arrangements: GFCI + breaker GFCI + switch + 1-socket recep GFCI deadfront (no sockets) useful for certain compliance issues GFCI that is a switch The last one looks like a GFCI dead front, but the Test/Reset buttons are ...


7

Additional violations: The breakers are double-tapped, yet they are the older HOM breakers that are not listed for 2 wires per tap. If you can downgrade the 240V circuit to 15A or 20A receptacles (NEMA 6), you'd have a "Multi-wire branch circuit" with mixed 120V and 240V loads. That would be fine with a 20A 2-pole breaker at that point, and the ...


6

I'm amending this answer to correct a misconception. There is nothing wrong with this installation I realize there's a trend these days in society where people want to destroy or conceal all utility space. As if they're shameful or something. Fine, then, go be Amish. For the rest of us... utilities are a miracle. Surface mount is particularly correct ...


6

It's OK, I've done it that way, but on a friends project, he didn't like it because at some future point, at some future remodel/change an electrician might have to drill thru the top plate for an additional cable, potentially hitting the existing cable. My friend is in the trades and on a remodel ended up killing a feed to the range. Took forever to find ...


6

100 lbs. jostling about creates quite a bit of force. I'd consider a 4x4 adequate up to about 8 feet of span. After that it's going to quickly become a rubber bad. Or worse, it could fracture and come down (hard). For spans of 8-12 feet, I'd put a 2x10 oriented vertically in a pair of joist hangers, and I'd put another flat on top of it, screwed every foot ...


6

You have truss bottom chords not "rafters" nor "joists". If you have the plans/documents they will undoubtedly list the bottom chord loading in pounds per square foot. A 22 foot 2x6 will behave like a wet noodle if it's not part of a truss. On the other hand, a 22 foot 2x4 that's part of a truss can carry quite a lot of load.


5

Relays to the rescue! While it may seem that you do not have enough wires in the ground for two travelers (or a traveler and a switched-hot), an always-hot, a neutral, and a ground, there is a way we can get always-hot power to the garage without sacrificing three-way control of the light. How is this possible, you may ask? Well, it turns out we can use a ...


5

Wow, you've got some really interesting solutions. On a very simple note, yes, you can do what you want. Remove the three way at the house, cap the red traveler, make the black traveler always hot. Now you have an always hot, a neutral, ground and a capped red wire going to the garage. Add your junction box and run 12/2 w/ground to your outlet, which must be ...


5

Arguably better: EMT on the surface, with THHN and 4 or less circuits per tube (i.e. not heading for the ceiling unless that actually makes sense for the circuit.) Or head for the ceiling and junction-box to NM-B there, but that's not much better, at least in the "it's a garage, rodents happen, metal is good insurance against teeth" sense. Couldn't ask for ...


5

Looks like you need a new garage door seal that's the actual length of your garage door width, not several inches shorter. I know my "nominal" 10 foot wide door is "actually" 10 feet 2 inches wide, for instance. But if I forgot that and got a "10 foot" seal it might come up short like that.


5

Your engineered trusses are almost certainly designed for insulation and drywall loads. I've never encountered a situation where they weren't, and I've been involved in residential construction almost since that garage was built. I wouldn't hesitate to finish the ceiling. Use no-sag 1/2" drywall to reduce weight if you like. Just use some sense when ...


5

If you can drill straight through to run longer chunks (or if not able to, a bunch of shorter chunks, and couplers, and perhaps slightly oversized holes in some studs to facilitate getting them in) you can just run the conduit in a straight line at the elevation you want the boxes at, and run straight into the sides of the boxes, rather than using a bunch of ...


4

I just ran my cables along the top of the bottom truss, tucked into the notch between the roof "rafter" and the ceiling joist. I did not nail them to the top of the top plates.


4

Very easy to resolve. Have seller put in writing that the ADU was legally permitted when built. He has put you on notice with "seller is 'convinced' that it was legally built." If you accept that statement, you are making the purchase "as is" based on what he believes, not factual evidence. Only if he puts it in writing that the ADU is ...


4

I suppose there must be a way you could splice dimensional lumber and make a longer span, but... why? Have a look at wood I-joists. Boise Cascade (BCI), LP Building Products (SolidStart) and Weyerhaeuser (TJI) are three options widely available in the US. (photo below from lpcorp.com) As a single point of reference, a BCI span table shows spans up to or ...


4

Hardwired Lights I have some plug-in ceiling lights. I don't particularly like them! One of them I finally switched - original was plug-in, so I replaced with a plug-in. It died early (cheap junk, but I didn't realize it at the time), I returned it to Home Depot and put the money towards a hardwired light. Not a big deal to remove the receptacles and hard ...


4

I had something like this in my garage where a water softener was previously. When the water softener was removed it was easier for the previous owner to just connect the pipes instead of opening up the wall and/or rerouting the plumbing to a less noticible location.


4

They all have to be reprogrammed. When you teach the system you add remotes 1 by 1. To remove 1, all remotes are erased from memory. they have to be taught 1 by 1 again sorry.


3

Install a drain at the low spot, or rent a concrete saw and cut drainage channels (run the saw on tapered shims so the channels slope correctly.) By cutting channels you should be able to intercept and redirect much of the water before it reaches the low spot. It might be possible to do that to the whole floor with a terrazzo grinder, but those seem to be a ...


3

This seems to be more of a legal problem than a "DIY" problem. My advice would be to have your offer to purchase contingent on seller providing clear and unassailable proof that the converted garage is fully permitted - whether from historic records or by going thru a new permitting request. And, as comments say, get yourself an attorney ...


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