22

Yes, absolutely!. You can do this by pulling out the switch, and splicing together the two wires that formerly went to the switch. Then put a blank cover plate over that switch's electrical box. You should know however, that you don't have to have a constant power outlet for a garage door opener. You can have a garage door opener on a switched outlet ...


20

TLDR: The spring failed naturally due to old age or manufacturing defect. Not your fault. As an aside, learn to properly grease garage doors. Oh boy. The bull-oney here is thick. Let's start with Springs vs Door Motion. The Spring is a counterweight. THAT IS ALL. We're not even talking about lifters yet. Just the door, with no external forces to move ...


14

It sounds like the controller needs to be reset and the remotes reprogrammed. Usually this requires physical access to the opener, but if you have a hardwired remote it might be possible to pair it via the keypad. Check the manual for your opener. But back to the problem of how to open it. If the garage does not have an alternative access there should be a ...


11

The garage door will automatically reverse if it encounters too much resistance or if the sensor beam is interrupted. To check for resistance, start with the door closed and pull the red handle. Then open and close the door. The movement should be fluid with no tough spots. If you encounter difficult spots, you likely have a bent track, a broken wheel, or a ...


10

(mild) Soap and water, sure. Don't use WD-40. It isn't a lubricant. Instead, look for white lithium grease. You can get it in a spray can with one of those small straw like things to put it exactly where you want it.


8

I'd like to add to the thread my experience/observation: same situation - won't close unless you hold the inside button, 10 flashes as the error. Both of my sensors "appeared" to be working. That is, the amber emitter would cause the green receiver to light when I had them aligned, and the green receiver would go out if I blocked the beam, so as I said, it ...


8

Torsion springs have a finite lifespan. They break. I seriously doubt that a little grease was a factor. Replace them both and move on with life. After you've done so, disconnect the opener (if present) and lift the door to mid-height. Does it balance there? Does it move freely throughout the range of travel? If not, deal with that. If so, you're done. ...


7

Powered graphite will be very messy. I still recommend spray on white lithium grease or garage door lube from PB Blaster. Both products are great for the chain, rollers, and roller channels. Never use WD 40 or any type of oils.


7

There are several things that could cause a door opener to not work properly. Tester101 put most of them in his comment, but most of those would at least result in the opener visibly and audibly trying to open the door, and then giving up. This may sound counterintuitive but my first priority would be getting the light working. Most garage door openers use ...


6

I just had an installer come out a couple weeks ago to lubricate my door and show me all the contact points to lubricate because my <1 year old door was doing the same. He recommended using silicone spray lubricant (which dries onto the applied surfaces), and lubricating twice a year - before and after winter. He didn't mention anything about washing ...


5

Do you have a button switch on the wall to open - close? There are usually two wires going to that. I don't think it will hurt to short those wires momentarily to test it. If it did, Lift Master would get a lot of returns because I'm certain many people have shorted the wired pair upon installation. My Craftsman has two wires going to a multiple switch panel....


5

Carefully determine where the wheels of the bottom of your door stop being used. Any point below the bottom of the wheels when the door is completely down should be safe to remove. The track shouldn't have to go all the way to the ground. I would not paint the track, for fear that it will interfere with smooth motion. If anything I'd use grease to lube ...


5

Most garage door openers need just a few inches above the garage door to work. If you have 6 inches above the opened garage door you should be fine. Some garage door openers need more space above the motor than others. Chain drives with the chain sprocket on top come to mind.


5

I had the same issue. I tried shading both the sensor and the emitter with card board and toilet paper rolls. Sometimes it worked and sometimes it didn't. Today it wouldn't cooperate at all. I even tried re-aiming the sensors. I was able to prove that it was the sun causing the issue by closing the door, disengaging the door from the opener, and ...


5

Check your sensors. The sensors could also be very dirty or blocked by something. Openers also often have cutout sensors that will stop the drive when the load gets too high on the motor. It may be that the load in your case may be too high due to wear, dragging rollers, bent track, lack of lubrication, or rusty chain/screw. Look for these things and ...


5

I had this issue last week. The lights on the sensor were fine. The issue was finally traced to loose connections at the sensors. Disconnected the sensors, re-stripped the wires and reconnected them. Door closes fine now. I think the sensors were working fine until the garage door starts moving, when the electrical supply to the sensors were getting ...


4

I used an old pair of polarized plastic safety sunglasses that were $6.00 new. I cut one lens off and slid it behind the sensor so that it covers the lens: no more sun problem stopping the beam so the door now works.


4

The sensors (the "eyes" that are on both sides of the door opening) are probably "out of whack". If the sensors are not aligned properly, the doors won't operate. They could of been kicked by accident.


4

I saw interference mentioned on a couple of responses. My hardwired buttons worked every time. None of the remotes (including the punch code one) worked. Climbed on step ladder and noticed crackling noise and flickering Compact Florescent Bulb CFL. Took out CFL. Good bye interference Everything works. Thanks


4

This. 100 times this. Darn CFL was causing the issue and I spent the past 5 years trying to figure out why a remote would work from 100 feet away, but never from 10 feet away. It turns out the auto 15m light kept the CFL on when I was leaving, but the light was never on when I arrived until after the remote triggered. Finally!


4

Verifying that the door operates correctly and without excessive force with the opener disconnected is a required first step. If the door jams, the opener cannot be expected to work well. Given a mechanically sound door system that operates properly by hand, odd behavior in "modern" (25 years or less, perhaps) garage door openers is almost always a sign of "...


4

Chamberlain has a PDF guide listing LED bulb compatibility, which includes your unit. More specifically, it lists: |-----------|---------------------------------|--------------| | | | Incandescent | | Make | Model | equivalent | |-----------|---------------------------------|--------...


4

A regular push button either normally closed or open will not work on most modern garage door openers, because the control pad doesn't just short or open the wires. They use resistors or some other mechanism to vary the voltage going back to the motor controller. You must purchase a Chamberlain compatible push button.


4

Yes, "it is possible to rewire the light socket with a standard electrical plug outlet AND to remove the switch & wire it to provide constant power to the new outlet." But, I wouldn't do it that way if I was you. All you probably have to do is install a new receptacle into your ceiling near your light bulb & then run NM-B building wire to the ...


4

I had the same issue on a brand new opener I just installed. The non-pulling side of the belt was loose and floppy when opening. Turns out I just didn't follow the instructions for tensioning the belt properly. Tensioning instructions right here: http://support.chamberlain.com/articles/How_To/How-do-I-check-and-adjust-the-belt-drive-tension-1484145517129 ...


4

I've never seen them. The battery maintenance would be a hassle anyway. Route and secure your wires appropriately to protect them, and build wood or metal guards around the sensor area to prevent careless people from banging into them. A simple block alongside the unit should do unless your home is populated by maniacs.


4

I do think the opener is named incorrectly - it should be Ambass-a-door. But that doesn't affect the solution: Get an extender IMHO, $2.74 isn't much compared to the hassle of cutting a hole in sheet metal and risking ruining a functional garage opener.


4

Maybe you can reach over the top of the door with a stiff wire (eg: 1/4" or 3/8" reinforcing bar) and release the emergency release? (then just lift the door manually) Maybe you can drill though the wall behind the wall control and access the wires? maybe you can drill through the door in the center near the top and activate the release with a metal rod


3

First, breakers are designed for avoiding draw over the rated current - old fuses did this by melting when the line in the fuse got too hot and melted. They are not designed as switches for operating a circuit, so your statement "It's not a big deal to flip the breaker" is only in reference to the amount of inconvenience you suffer. The breakers should not ...


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