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13

You raise a number of issues. How to fill an irregularly shaped hole? To cut drywall (or any panel) to an exact shape with non parallel sides is hard. So what we usually do is make the hole regular. You can trim away some of the remaining drywall, preferably so the edge runs along the middle of a stud, parallel to another stud or the corner. Then cut a ...


11

Do not try to use caulk between all the boards. It will look like crap and on top of that, like you already indicated, it will be hard to put in there in the first place. The proper approach to this is to install vertical strips of wood over the cracks from the outside. You can choose to use something like 1x2 inch cedar strips. Or if your shed looks like ...


8

There may or may not be an easy answer to your question. I would start by calling the grout and tile manufacturers to get their opinion. In general though... You should reasonably expect to get the quality of service you contracted and paid for. Bottom line is do you think you're getting what you paid for. Not what you think you paid for. If you hire the ...


6

If you're not happy with the job or you have concerns, you should talk to the contractor. Make sure it's very clear what quality level you expect, and that you're concerned that this does not meet that expectation. You may find that there was a reason the tile was installed in this way, and that the experienced tiler knows you'll never notice the flaws in ...


5

I think your third idea will work and look the best. First fill the void with expanding foam, allow the foam to cure, then cut it off flush with the face of the existing door trim. Then cover the area with whatever molding/trim you find most aesthetically pleasing. You may wish to miter or cope the corners to get a more finished appearance.


5

I ended up getting this fixed in what I suspect is the only way it would get fixed - I had the floor fixed. I was planning on doing it myself but when the toilet started leaking a bit (presumably because of some residual rocking due to the uneven floor) I finally just hired someone to come out and fix it quickly and correctly. The toilet was conveniently ...


4

You will want to clean the area first. Scrape and moderately sand any peeling paint. Afterwards use a latex caulking which you can find at any home improvement store. This caulking is paintable which is the main reason I would use it and also shrinks and expands with temperature and moisture changes. Once the caulk is completely cured according to the ...


4

If you want to fill a large gap with caulk, the first thing you do is fill the gap with a caulk "backer rod" that's made of foam. They come in various diameters are are typically found near the weather stripping in a home improvement store. You shove the backer in with a putty knife (not too deep, just enough to be below the surface), and then cover with ...


3

Just wrap a small encasement around the board and last couple inches of wall. Three boards finished to match the rails. I doubt you would even need to do 45s, just drop the side boards from the top board by cutting it longer than the wall is wide/thick by twice the thickness of a side board.


3

If I were you I'd try this Fill the gap with expanding foam. Give it a full day to cure (it expands so doing it too soon will potentially leave it uneven) and cut any bubbles off so it's flush Buy some really good outdoor (oil based) caulk. The local big box sells something called Quad but if that's not available you can probably find something similar in ...


3

The ideal method to repair the gap (if the spout can not be tightened further, is to shorten the length of the pipe nipple that exits the wall and connects to the spout. You need to un-screw the spout and the pipe nipple. Replace with a shorter nipple equal to the gap measurement. Use Teflon tape on all male pipe threads and caulking behind the spout base. ...


3

Drywall compound by itself might not be the best solution since its not really a great gap filler; it requires a backing to adhere to which is why you use either paper or fiberglass tape when putting up drywall. As tester101 suggested, you could use crown molding or quarter round to cover it up. I would imagine that filling it with mortar might give the ...


3

The easiest way to do this is buy a piece of 1x3 lumber. Cut a piece to go across the back and screw to wall (predrill your lumber). Put a piece in each side and screw to cabinets. You do not have to make your sides the full length - you can hide the ledgers and make the counter look floating. If you know your counter material you can deduct that ...


2

It is hard to tell from the picture how wide it is. If it is 1/8 inch or less I would caulk it. If it is bigger than I would go over it with wood putty. You can paint over each. Also if you use wood putty chances are it will eventually form a small crack (expansion) and need to be caulked.


2

Normally there are two options, though it sounds like you just replaced the range and haven't made any other changes, so you might only have one. If its the plug sticking out that is the issue, then either yourself or an electrician (depending on your skill level) can change out the outlet for a recessed outlet. Whether you can do this will depend on a lot ...


2

Another option is to buy a piece of decorative molding, whose bottom edge is at least as thick as the gap. Just attach it to the wall, setting it directly against the top of the counter's backsplash to block the gap. Caulk if desired. If you screw it to the wall instead of glue, you can remove it if the landlord doesn't like it.


2

This gap is too large to fill with caulk alone, but you can fill it and then caulk over the top. Using rubber tubing is an OK idea, and should work, but there are other products which are specifically designed for this purpose. You can use foam backer rod, also known as caulk saver to fill the space behind the counter top. It comes in many different sizes ...


2

In the end, I used joint compound to build out the gap. I used wood shims to create a backing and set a depth for the fill. To avoid compound sticking to the wood and to also give a small shadow gap, I added strips of cardboard wrapped in plastic from a cut up letter file. Next, the 3/8" gap was filled with joint compound and left to dry for 24+ hours. ...


2

It happens when someone replaces the tub spout, and doesn't want to risk removing and replacing the nipple in the wall with the correctly sized one. The fix is to remove the spout and the nipple from the wall (the short pipe threaded on both ends) and get a new nipple of the correct length. Before removing the spout, measure the gap so you know how much ...


2

To start with, that kind of a gap is common everywhere. Regarding pests, your dwelling is more permeable than you'd ever think, so closing off this one thing isn't going to solve any problems. If they exist, pests need to be dealt with at their source (ie, nests), not at their symptoms (ie, them walking across your floor). If you still want to seal, you ...


2

The way I addressed this issue was with a wide shim under the carpet that brought the floor height up gradually over about 12 inches I made my own but you can buy them look at this video to see how they work You can purchase kits of various sizes to fit your needs here ( I do not have any affiliation with the companies featured in this answer)


2

They're not intentionally left open. Masons apply mortar to the two faces of the block and typically there's a gap left in between. It would be difficult to get the joints completely full without massive waste in the form of squeeze-out. You can fill them with about anything that meets your needs.


2

Any inorganic gravel or sand will do the job. The trick is packing it in tightly enough to eliminate all gap. As you can imagine, concrete doesn't flex, and any gap will eventually result in a crack and settling of the concrete. Fill the gap by tamping horizontally with a piece of lumber or similar tool, and work your way out. A little bit of moisture might ...


2

A very common gap size for concrete swimming pool decks, check a local pool store for wood, plastic and rubber expansion joint fillers. Thinner Concrete Pavers could also be cut into strips and dropped or stuffed in. Otherwise, there's no problem with filling (and ramping, if desired) the gap with concrete or cement. The filler won't have any interaction ...


2

As noted above you should be able to find a wooden transition piece that would be large enough. The box stores may not carry such a large piece in stock but I'd be surprised if you couldn't find one online somewhere. Another option is to make a wooden transition piece yourself by taking something a 1x4 board and beveling the edges using a table saw, then ...


2

Battens screwed to the side (and possibly the back if you want belt-and-braces) is what I immediately thought of as I started to read your question. It probably won't be stronger than L-brackets, but it will be a lot prettier (and probably cheaper too). Make sure that you use the right sort of screw to screw into the cupboard sides - if they are chipboard, ...


2

Either wood or L brackets will work for the supports. I'm not sure which one would be stronger; the weak point would probably be the attachment of the brackets to the existing cabinets. I would use L brackets just because they take up less space - this could be important if you plan to put an appliance under there. You probably don't want to attach the new ...


2

Part of the reason why a floating deck "works" is that it is not attached to the house in any way. If you put in something that physically connects the deck to the house, even Great Stuff, you will end up with one of two possibilities: Stays together when the deck moves If the deck and the house stay together when the deck moves then you will be twisting ...


1

How to correct for the gaps is a challenge if you just decide to "stick something in there" such as caulk or shims. I say that because anything you do along those lines is going to look crappy and kludged up. The best solution would be to do a re-install by carefully measuring each individual piece and cutting it to the correct length. Done that way then a ...


1

Assuming you have little to no batt insulation at that corner (and there's nothing snug that would hold-up a strip of the same if stuffed into the crack with a putty knife): Get a 4"-8" wide strip of metal screen (as used in a screen door) and fold it in half. Insert it into the crack. Tape it open, to the left and right sides of the gap, respectively, ...


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