20

Looks like minor leaks, compounded by mixing galvanized pipe and copper/bronze valve without using dielectric couplings between dissimilar metals. Honestly, any plumber installing NEW galvanized pipes (rather than just making repairs to existing) in the past 5 years is doubtful. If you really want threaded pipe, stainless is available and lead-free, which ...


9

100% galvanic corrosion, "Pipes in the house are a mix of copper, galvanized, and pex", different metals cause corrosion. You should stick to one type of metal in your pipes or use pex. **Note that galvanized means iron/metal with sacrificial coating usually zinc in this case. See https://galvanizeit.org/hot-dip-galvanizing/how-long-does-hdg-last/...


6

24-gauge is 24-gauge. However, the the silver type round pipe is coated with a rather inexpensive galvanizing coating. This coating is to inhibit rust. The galvanizing keeps oxygen and moisture away from the raw metal.These elements will discolor the metal, causing the metal to oxidize and rust, thus shortening the life of the metal. Now for the down side ...


5

Yes, you have small leaks causing rust. See how the rust practically flows like water in this picture? Overall, galvanized pipe should be avoided nowadays as there are much better options such as pex. Ever seen the inside of an in-use galvanized pipe? It looks exactly like what your seeing on the outside. I would not try tightening it further as you will ...


4

The galvanized pipe is what is corroding and rusting. As noted,there may be other factors at play here like leaky connections but the galvanized pipe is definitely a problem. You should re-plumb with cooper pipe, or pex, and make sure to use a Dielectric Nipple on the inlet and outlet of the water heater.


4

This can be a problem with old galvanized pipe if you had pieces break inside I would expect the same or worse here. I would purchase a kit for an emergency repair because my experience has been when 1 piece crumbles the rest is in similar shape. You should look into driving some ground rods also years ago houses only had 1 ground the water pipe, I have ...


4

That horse has already left the barn. You striped off the protective rubberized coating and exposed the cable underneath which is not galvanized and the rust has already started to eat the cable. Had you left the coating on it would have lasted much longer, at least until UV light cracked and compromised the coating and exposed the cable to the elements. ...


3

You're right to have the city turn off the water at the street but I don't think anyone on this site will say you can safely remove the small pipe or valve. That being said, you've got a corroded mess on your hands. The gate valve needs to be replaced. You're going to have to cut a pipe, unless there is a union, to start disassembling this. Clean up the ...


3

My educated guess without being there is that the flex connector joint was not installed correctly or is just leaking. I never liked this type of installation since it was made for the novice and not a professional. I always used hard copper and a non-lead solder containing silver. I also never used galvanized piping, just brass fittings and copper tubing. ...


2

Galvanized will last forever in a desert and a few years " close to the ocean". Stainless usually means 304 or 316 ; 316 is better near the ocean . Very pricey but, monel would be the best ; available as boat hardware at a marine supply source.


2

The age-old question of whether or not to use alloy materials is subjective. cost vs. longevity consequence/cost of failure Rest assured that the galvanized components will fail. You will then be unable to adjust the tension of the cables. If the consequences of the failure outweigh the initial investment for alloy materials, you should buy stainless (this ...


2

The problem is that you have a metal to metal connection between the stainless eyes and galvanized wire rope. Add water and you get galvanic corrosion. Either electrically insulate the connection or change the eyes to galvanized ones. The purpose of the plastic coating is mainly to give the cable a cleaner/smoother/softer surface. The galvanizing is to ...


2

This video shows retrofit steel plate fasteners to strengthen the connections you have (at 3 min): connection of beam to post


2

Those are galvanized. The texture says it all. Those different dark and light spots of silver all over the nail are crystals created as the zinc quickly cools in the air. Take a look at the image below and at this article by the American Galvanizer Association. https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://galvanizeit.org/uploads/...


2

Looking at your photo I believe I see the upper 2 pipe unions appear to be dielectric unions, notice the orange insulators. Dielectric unions isolate the copper to steel and would be the industry standard way to connect copper to galvanized pipe. The lower pipes are flex pipes most commonly nickel plated brass with a plastic liner so no problem there either. ...


1

The best solution, as long as the area is already exposed, is to replace all brass fittings that had been mated to iron nipples. I did try cleaning out the female threads of the upper left brass tee using toothpicks and a wire brush, and installing a new brass nipple with PTFE tape. After adding a new shut-off valve and pressurizing the line, the work seemed ...


1

Considering the age of the pipe and the odds of it being so rusted inside as to be nearly useless, I would consider now a good time to improve the drain! I would first look at what I had to cut the pipe, rather than try to fight it loose! One easy step is to grind it off if no other metal cutting tools are available. Then I would start building back with ...


1

Corrosion in a domestic water system can be caused by a number of things. The big one that you already dealt with is galvanic corrosion resulting from connecting steel or iron water pipes to copper. This corrosion can be mitigated by installing dielectric connectors. They won't necessarily stop the galvanic response entirely but will certainly minimize it. ...


1

As has been stated combining copper and galvanized requires a dielectric union between them to reduce galvanic corrosion. However, to specifically answer your first question: As long as dielectric unions are used where they meet, is there a problem with having both galvanized and copper in the same system? The answer is no there isn't a problem but it also ...


1

Dielectric unions reduce the rate of galvanic corrosion that occurs when dissimilar metals are in electrical contact. They don't eliminate it but they slow it down. How much does occur also depends on the mineral content of your water. You should always use a dielectric union when there is a transition between one metal and other. Dielectric unions are not ...


1

The zinc was cut off when the pipe was threaded and most rust is from bare steel threads . There may be a bare steel close nipple in there also. So the zinc/galvanized is pretty much doing it's job where it was not removed. The moisture is from condensation not leakage. If you replace it with new galvanized ( which contains no more than a trace of lead) ...


1

Indoors? No they won't corrode. Zinc looks different than stainless which is more dull, so just get the right screws. It looks bad, I've done it before on accident. Commercial door hardware companies will have boxes of them.


1

Without the photo it could be several things , the first that comes to mind is not normally used on those fittings normally pipe thread sealant or pipe dope , those threads normally have a compression ring of rubber or plastic and should never see any water that’s why I put it first. Pipe dope turns hard and crusty after a couple of decades and is be easy to ...


1

Galvanic corrosion is a problem when the two metals are wet or damp , water being necessary to conduct current causing corrosion. In some conditions of humidity and temperature change ,a small amount of water can condense ,promoting corrosion. Any time aluminum is connected to another metal there can be corrosion. I once had a home with a damp crawl space, ...


1

I don't know how they do their calculations about how long the coating lasts, but I have used some of their coated fasteners in the past and they are high quality. I would guess that the coating lasts at least as long as galvanized, so the idea that it lasts two times longer could maybe be accurate. An added plus is that the coating is pretty smooth ...


1

Depending on the strength required, its possible to place a crimp with the wire's coating/sheath still on, and if a thinble was also used INSIDE the loop this would help extend the useful life of the looped section. Soaking the wire in heavy oil or a rust preventative wherever the coating is removed or damaged will slow rusting. PS. Even galvanized wire rope ...


1

I say they are both poor choices . Look for 13 Cr stainless steel , it is magnetic ( what modern auto exhaust systems are made with ).Second choice is thicker carbon steel , galvanizing makes little difference . Because a wood stove can get very hot, I greatly doubt that any paint available to the consumer will help. Zinc melts about 700 F and then forms ...


1

You cannot use HVAC ducting for a wood fireplace or stove exhaust. The stove/fireplace exhaust parts are typically triple-wall and are totally different in terms of their construction and connection methods. HVAC ducting is simple single wall sheet metal with leaky joints that you cover with foil tape. It's not an issue of galvanized vs painted.


1

Yes, just remove all the zinc galvanizing using a well vented media blast cabinet. You'll need to do that anyway to get paint to stick. Also check other vendors. Some people emotionally chain themselves to the local big-box store. They know this and stiff you on anything you're not likely to price check. I regularly catch them asking 3x what the thing ...


1

Galvanised steel has a distinctive "spangled" appearance. The crystalline structure of the Zinc is visible. There are two main types hot-dip galvanised electrogalvanised (electroplated zinc) You can often tell if something has been hot-dip galvanised. It looks like a thicker coating is present. This is better.


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