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3

I had a similar problem with water stains on my bar. I used a 50-50 mixture of vinegar and olive oil and wiped it on the stains in the direction of the grain. The vinegar removed the stain and the olive oil polished up the surface. I've heard that a hair dryer on high will remove the stains too but have never tried it. Hope this worked for you.


0

I'd add 2 horizontal pieces of 2x4 to the exterior of each side piece. One at the top and one at the bottom. These pieces would extend past the end of the foot board by 1.5". I'd then add two vertical pieces of 2x4 to the exterior of the foot board. Then I'd screw the verticals to the horizontals. Then I'd chip out all the broken crap and fill it with ...


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First I'd try to cosmetically repair the footboard as good as possible with some wood glue, especially the top part. Then position the footboard like it originally was and drill through the sides into the footboard about 2 or 3 inches from the damaged areas and about 4" deep. Get yourself some lag screws and screw the bed back together. Normally I'd say to ...


2

That looks pretty busted up, and I'm guessing you want to fix it, and making it stronger than it was it more inportant than making it look good as new. MDF and chipboard are weak in edge-grain, so for durable connections screw into (and preferable through) the faces not into the edges. What you do is get some 20mm x 2mm aluminum angle that's as long as ...


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OSB comes in various grades. Often the two sides are different grades. 7/16 and 1/2 inch are used as sheathing. The inside face isn't as solid as the outside face, but doesn't have inked stuff all over it. 5/8 and 3/4 are often used for subfloors and subroof. They are sanded flat on the top face, and are tight on the bottom face. They make an ...


0

Paper it! It doesn't need to be wall paper, you could use old news paper then paint over the paper.


4

Straightforward enough job. We stabilize wood like that all the time. I'd start by painting the piece with a thin coat of either Amercote or West System Epoxy, just to freeze the splinters so they won't keep redeveloping as you prep. Then a very thorough sanding with a jitterbug sander until there are no high spots whatsoever. Then one more shot with ...


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