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1

That photo 99% likely uses black iron gas pipe and fittings. The bulk of the machining oil left on this pipe simply needs to be wiped off with a cloth and you can then use a degreaser to get the rest of it off. Lightly sand away any surface rust and prime with a self-etching primer. Then use a high-quality spray paint which can stand up to the abuse of those ...


1

As @alephzero mentioned, you can get anodized aluminum in any color. The texture looks more like bare metal than paint if that is what you want. Here is a picture of the 2020 aluminum extrusion.


3

One technique that may give you what you're looking for is to get black iron pipe, clean it off with soap and water (this will remove the shipping oil), brush it well with a wire brush or wire wheel to remove any rust or thick black oxidation, and spray paint it with clear enamel. The enamel isn't perfectly nonpermeable, and will actually allow some oxygen ...


3

I made a table with pipe. I used ½" "Black Pipe" from Menards, which is steel. If you have a store close by, they should have the lengths and fittings you need in stock. While there was some oil on the pipes, a rag did a good enough job cleaning it off. The fittings are not as black as the pipe, as you can see in the photo. There are several ...


12

What's in the photo is painted. Any pipe you use will require surface preparation for paint to last a long time and not chip off easily. Galvanized pipe will require either the galvanizing to be removed chemically or by harsh mechanical removal... or you can leave galvanized stuff outdoors for a year, and it will gain a zinc oxide layer paint will stick to. ...


6

Frame challenge: PVC? You do not really need iron pipes to hold in bottles. If you are using new, not salvaged pipe for the project you could make this with PVC pipe much more cheaply. You could cut the PVC much more easily. If you like the black painted look, PVC takes a coat of paint just fine. Also (arguably) if this is to protect bottles during an ...


8

The black iron ( carbon steel ) pipe comes with "mill varnish". I have never seen an ASTM specification for it. I understand it can be anything a mill wants . Very long ago it was probably creosote from coke ovens. You just need to try things like naphtha, paint thinner, etc to see what works. When oil companies purchase pipeline pipe, they order ...


0

You cheat You make a saw cut halfway down the least observable part of the pipe. Now the 2 halves of that pipe can rotate independently. How do you keep them physically aligned? Install inside it, a pipe or rod whose OD is slightly smaller than the ID of the pipe. This sleight-of-hand pipe won't have any strength in tension, so don't depend on it for that....


0

Most threaded pipes an fittings for water use are tapered so that the fit gets tighter as you thread the pieces together. If you get pipes that have straight threads for "A" and "C", you can first thread one end in farther than you need to, and then as you thread in the opposite end, it will unscrew, but not all the way. Unfortunately, ...


1

An alternative to threaded plumbing connections is to use T's and elbows (and corners) with set screws. Called 'structural pipe fittings' they actually have a threaded screw perpendicular to the pipe, and its tightened to keep pipes in place. I suspect they don't have the weight capacity of threaded or bonded (cemented) pipe. source: lowes.com (entire ...


0

There is also a slimline union method. You can get a straight iron (gas barrel) connector which is completely threaded on the inside. You cut (parallel) threads on one of the pipe ends to be connected so you can wind a locknut, and connector, completely onto it. You thread the normal amount (tapered) of the end of the other pipe to be connected, apply tape ...


1

If you want to make a loop, or repair a hole you drilled in a pipe without undoing all of it, there are unions, but those are large, and not legal to use inside walls (or so I’ve been told). The other clean option is a left/right nipple and a left/right coupling. https://www.plumbingsupply.com/leftright.html These are fittings with left handed threads so ...


4

Using iron pipe with threaded fittings and ends, the "trick" used is to put inline joints at B and D so the pipework can be taken apart. This is also done in real systems so that changes and repairs can be made easily. This is the type of connection, called an inline joint or coupling : And it has a flat rubber type washer which is compressed by ...


10

The link shows a hidden trick. The front section and the rear sections are built separately, there are no closed loops in each piece. Then the short horizontal pieces are cut in half and screwed into the tees. The front and rear sections are joined by sliding the cut pieces into larger diameter horizontals. After a dry fit, the front and rear can be glued ...


0

If you are looking to pipe this as a closed loop, such as a configuration for a heating loop, all you need to do is start with one long pipe and add an elbow at one end, next is a nipple, then the next elbow, then the next long pipe and so on. this will give you a closed loop. IF this is not what you want, please explain what you want the end product to be ...


6

Plumbing-oriented: Classically, for threaded pipes, you use a union, or two unions. Modernly, it's trivial with push-to-connect fittings. It's also classically trivial with soldered connections. Sometimes brazed rather than soldered, depending on the "industrial" nature of the process. (for the example shown in the link, given no need to hold water,...


1

T-nuts, or tee-nuts will work fine, if the look on the other side isn't too important. They bite into the opposite side of the wood, and the bolts can be cut off flush when tight. Drill out the hole appropriately, and fill with epoxy resin as required.


2

drill the holes larger and use threaded inserts. In the inserts are too long grind them shorter after installing them. It looks like plywood. these will hold very well in plywood.


1

Those do look like expansion anchors, AKA expansion bolts, as you state. However, because of the very shallow depth of the holes (which led to a lack of strength and early failure), it might be difficult to find a replacement that would hold. If appearance is not important, I'd drill through the hole and use two nuts, with washers, to hold each screw. Longer ...


1

On the assumption that the metal L shaped length is there to support the slats: either two plates of thin plywood (3mm), one on either side, long enough so they don't block the lateral slats - so maybe 6" long, high enough to span top to metal, wth 4 bolts/nuts through, 2 either side - a good way away from the crack. If you can find some 1mm metal plate,...


0

Consider making a new rail from "real" wood. It looks like white oak may be a better match and less conspicuous than a patch across the crack.


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