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Water flows in the direction of least resistance. You need a french drain to keep the water off the wall. Moisture is either coming up from below (a rising water table) or its coming from the surrounding ground water in the saturated soil. If it comes up from a rising water table, it will enter the living space from below through the crack between the ...


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A French drain needs a location to drain to. Some drains are like a curtain in front of the house that extend down the side of the house to the lower area where the water can drain. If there is not a way to move the water or allow it to flow it would be useless. Some drains on flat ground end up in sumps so the water can be pumped out. Most of my homes have ...


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My last home a daylight basement had a similar issue when we purchased it. A deep French drain in front of the house with drain legs going down the side of the home completely solved our problem along with epoxy coating the entire floor of the lower level. The drain legs down the side of the house were dug 2 ‘ below the foundation level at the bottom and ...


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One of the things I have done in the past with crushed rock driveways is pack it with a roller or plate compactor until there is no movement, then use some Portland cement on the surface and broom the surface so the cement gets in the cracks, this is not a big area but with a bus or other heavy equipment using it the cement (dry powder) swept in and a light ...


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Some of the stone in the foreground looks maybe as large as 1-1/4 inch, but the stuff on the road looks like maybe 3/4 and smaller. Runoff could be carrying it there, but it might also be tracked out by vehicle tires. Larger stone would stay in place better -- you could try topping this with 2 inch gravel.


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