Episode #125 of the Stack Overflow podcast is here. We talk Tilde Club and mechanical keyboards. Listen now
6

Putting a drain sump on the inside is like catching the blood from a cut on your arm into a cup. What you really need to be doing is taking a hard look at what caused the cut and remedy that problem instead. Just pasting on bandaids will not do the trick. So getting back to the house situation. Look hard at what it takes to get water away from the outside ...


5

The holes in the pipe are enough; drilling more would weaken the pipe. The important thing with French drains is to have a good bed of gravel around the pipe for several inches. I like using a sock on my pipes to prevent the fine gravel from falling into the holes. No need to drill more holes the ones that are there are more than enough.


3

You could certainly perforate the lower section of the sump basin with small holes (1/4 inch/6mm or less would be my preference, but some might go twice/3 times as large - depends in part what you are bedding it in) Outside the basin, you'd want washed stone (depending on soil type, possibly filter fabric and washed stone) Inside the basin, a concrete ...


3

Well, a (concrete slab) floor is just a floor, supported by its substrate. You may have some subsidence afterwards, so I'd advise my tips here, especially the one about undermining it a little to lock it all in place once you re-pour. Rebar is a must. Done right*, I have no concern for the foundation. I'd be worried that there's a pocket under the slab ...


3

I'd consider fiber cement trim board. Almost all of it is Class 1 (A) fire rated, it's easy to find at the big box stores in a variety of dimensions, and it will most likely pass for baseboard if it's thicker than the "plasterboard or decently-thick plywood".


2

If the French drain is between your basement slab and the exterior walls, it may be the source of most of your radon. Sounds like a small suction from the drain sump to the outside is a good plan. A small fan with its own exhaust pipe shouldn't be a problem for the water heater or furnace but a CO detector is never bad for closed rooms with gas appliances.


2

The holes point down, below the pipe is a 2-3 in layer of gravel that the pipe sits on. The pipe needs to drop 1/8 inch per foot of distance, if I'm not mistaken. 80 feet distance equals 10 inch drop from the start of drain to finish (where it drains to). I'm unsure which pipe is better to use overall but I would assume solid PVC (with holes pointed down) ...


2

Concrete is an wonderfully easy product to shape. For your scenario, all you really need is make a form for the concrete that matches the concavity of your drain, and to set it in place when you place the concrete. It's not clear when you say curved if the drain itself curves along its length or if by curve you refer to the concave portion of the drain. ...


2

The problem with this approach is that using a sewer auger in the corrugated drain can actually damage the soft plastic drain tile. The cutting edges on the auger can tear into the pipe and then allow the collapse of the drain. The corrugated pipe is used because it is cheap and quick to install. Solid PVC pipe with holes is a better choice if you want to be ...


2

Same sort of basement entry here in Seattle. Intermittent flooding and the hassle of sweeping wet leaves out of the stairwell for too many years. I love my current solution. A friend drilled support-heavy screws into the concrete foundation. We cut 3 pieces of heavy duty plywood to cover the space and fit around the bases of the railing at the top. One end ...


2

The water table around my house is very high with a lot of surface water due to clay subsoil. My experience of 25 years in my current house (boat?) is adding a french drain around the house is a patch to a larger yard grading problem. I've done this and eventually they clog and need maintenance. Over time I've regraded most of my yard so water flows away ...


2

It actually isn't that bad of a place. Most basement bathrooms I do end up being in a corner. Builder planning on actual drain location is basically useless because they can't get in your head on what you will want in 5 years. Remember that what you are currently seeing will be covered. The corner location allows you to easily connect your sink drain ...


2

It's possible that this was installed as part of a Radon mitigation system, or for future use as part of a Radon mitigation system if one was needed. You shouldn't use it as a drain, unless you've verified that it ties into the main plumbing stack. Since you probably don't want to dump sewage under your slab.


2

Look at a typical "dry well" install - basically terminate the pipe into a blob of crushed rock, or an actual void/hole/tube punched full of holes, so the water can filter out. Just stopping the pipe underground will not work well. In an essentially non-freezing climate there should be little problem with this - they can be done well in freezing climates, ...


2

It depends on what your soil consists of. Actually, a nonwoven fabric is recommended for soils on the sandy side. However if your soil is a good part (>20%) clay, thats where things get tricky. The opening has to be smaller, about 70 US Sieve (.212mm), but there's a catch. The smaller opening will now be subject to clogging the fabric instead of the pipe and ...


2

I don’t think that a French drain will benefit your situation unless the issue is surface water flowing over the top of the retaining wall. If that is the case, then it might help, but you would not want to connect a drain inside the sunken area to it as it could actually allow water to enter the lower area. A French drain is simply a tench filled with ...


2

I think you are misunderstanding how interior french drains work. Exterior french drains help divert water away from the foundation and thereby reduce the amount of water entering the basement. Interior french drains divert water that has entered the basement through the walls and help prevent mold and flooding. Typically, in a finished basement an interior ...


2

Cinder blocks are quite porous. To keep a basement or crawl space dry means keeping subterranean water (water table) and surface water off the foundation wall. Where I live we have a water table at about -24". The only way we can keep basements or crawl spaces dry is to: 1) install a 4"-6" perf pipe about 6"-8" BELOW the basement slab or crawl space, 2) ...


2

Location Since the water generally comes from outside the home's footprint, drain tile is usually installed along the footing (inside, outside, or both, depending on the situation). Whether you need interior circuits in your case is uncertain. Depth You don't want your drain to work harder than necessary, so it shouldn't be deeper than necessary. They're ...


2

You're going to need an outlet for that water regardless of whether you have a ditch or a french drain (and in your case, I think you are describing not so much a french drain as a "diversion trench"). Digging a very deep ditch, as you have done, is not nearly as effective as digging a very shallow ditch that actually has an outlet of some kind. Eventually ...


2

How long do you plan to keep the house? I'd just get the tiles tested and remediated. How many square feet are you thinking about? Self level isn't cheap and if you want to make your basement usable at some time in the future you probably want to do something more through. I've fixed up a number of 1920 basements that had sump pits for ground water ...


2

It sounds like the grading of your ditch and/or yard degraded (pun not intended) or was never perfectly graded. even a a berm of a few inches is enough to trap water in a puddle and saturate the soil. Especially clay. Some time with a shovel and a laser level to grade the yard and ditch better would be more effective. If you lack a laser level or the eye ...


2

There are gravel driveway stabilizer products made to solve this kind of problem. They typically take the form of a mesh/lattice of some sort - sometimes flexible/fabric while others are a ridgid plastic


2

You are trying to combine two systems: 1) collection of ground water, and 2) collection of roof drainage. This is a bad idea...don’t do it. 1) Perforated pipe is used to COLLECT ground water. The concept behind the use of perforated pipe is that water flows in the direction of least resistance. That is to say, ground water near the perf pipe will flow into ...


1

It sounds like you are using a pier foundation. Piers should be deep enough that they are hitting undisturbed, solid soil or bedrock. As such, there's likely little reason to have a french drain in that situation as the footings should be well below the depth that would be effected greatly by surface water.


1

Concrete is porous and will not completely stop water from entering anything. If you want to stop water from entering your basement you need to have your exterior soil properly graded and packed, in addition to your gutters cleaned and draining away several feet away from your house. Regarding grading, a good number to shoot for is 1" of 'fall' for every ...


1

Somewhat up to you, but standard practice (IMPE) is to cover the pipe with some rock, then fold the fabric over to "box" the pipe (overlapping the fabric, unless you want to get fanatical and seam it), then cover with more rock to keep it in place.


1

A drop of 150mm would work best if you did it in the summer so that the bricks below the DPC could dry out a bit. If you did it mid winter and another big freeze happened then these bricks could be subject to freezing and surface cracking / erosion. In general - if you do drop the garden by 150mm the bricks below the DPC would benefit from some form of ...


1

These materiasl will work. Lining the trench with landscape fabric and wrapping it over the top (of the rubble) will keep silt from clogging your drain. For higher volume flow, I'd add a perforated pipe at the bottom, but it's surely overkill for just a sink. Definitely make your rubble somewhat uniform, for best support for the overburden (assuming you ...


1

It would depend on soil type and the load on the foundation. As a very rough rule of thumb, the soil actively supporting a foundation spreads at a 45 degree angle downwards from the outer lower edges of the foundation. You should be able to dig outside this section with impunity. If you encroach upon it, if you only excavate something like 15 foot sections ...


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