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15

You are definitely running a risk of freezing these lines in an unheated space. It is never wise to run water lines in an outside wall or above an insulated ceiling in an unheated space. Perhaps you can do one of the following: Run the lines under the floor in the basement (not unheated crawl space) where freezing will be much less likely. Run the lines ...


12

tl;dr 15 Ampere cord-and-plug appliances can indeed, safely be connected to 20 Ampere receptacles. A deeper understanding NEMA 6 is a design standard for three wire grounded cord-and-plug devices and receptacles. The number after the dash (-), is the current rating of the device. For example. A NEMA 6-20 device, would be a three wire grounded cord-and-...


10

It's all about the temperature/pressure relationship, and how pressure affects the boiling point of the refrigerant. As the pressure of a refrigerant goes up, so too does the temperature and boiling point. When the pressure drops, the temperature and boiling point drop as well. Air conditioning (and some heating) systems take advantage of this, to cool (heat)...


8

Your plumber seems to be poorly educated if you are left without the following solutions having been mentioned. This is pretty standard problem for folks with a boiler AND a woodstove - the woodstove keeps the house warm and the boiler pipes are subject to freezing off in the corners of the house. Not that this is your situation, but a "standard" solution ...


7

I think you answered your own question: They do have pipe insulation on them (though due to my own stupidity the insulation on the place that burst had fallen off and I hadn't replaced it.) The pipe insulation on the rest of the system worked as it should. The only reported failure was where there was not insulation. This suggests to me that the ...


6

Based on the pics and the amount of movement alone, I'm guessing that the foundation for this slab was not properly prepared. I'd wager that someone simply dug a squareish hole a few inches deep, put in boards for forms and poured the concrete. Looks great for a while, but doesn't do squat to avoid shifting in cold weather when the water freezes. A proper ...


6

Latex paint is composed of a mixture of components that when frozen can cause the solids to expand and separate from the mixture. Effects of using damaged latex paint can result in degraded performance such as un-even coat, less gloss, cracking and peeling of paint much sooner when exposed to the environments (sun light), and etc. It is not recommended to ...


6

I have an idea for you. Instead of insulating and heating the entire garage to save a few gallons of paint, perhaps you could build a small insulated paint locker. Build a box or cabinet large enough to store all your paints. Insulate the inside with some 2 inch rigid foam or R-11 blanket insulation and put some foam weather stripping around the insulated ...


6

Chlorodifluoromethane, also known as R22 refrigerant has a boiling point of -40°F at 0 psi. As you increase the pressure of the refrigerant, the boiling point also increases. At 68.5 psi, the boiling point of R22 is 40°F. In a normally functioning system, the refrigerant is sent into the evaporator at about 55-65 psi. Which means that the boiling ...


5

I had 5 gallons of paint freeze and no amount of mixing would get the lumps out! I mixed it for over an hour, no difference... ruined!


5

It could very well be a frozen pipe, it could also be that the valve has become clogged somehow. The only way to tell for sure if its a frozen pipe is either find the frozen pipe, or wait for it to thaw. If water starts flowing when the temperature warms up then you know it was frozen. If you have copper pipes, the worst case would be that when it thaws ...


5

You are correct that having a hot radiator on what's effectively a cold space - the porch - is very inefficient and, presuming nobody's on the porch most of the time, wastes a lot of energy. And you are correct that the hot water going into that radiator is being cooled in the process. However, it is unlikely that the water is going to any other radiators, ...


5

If it's a metal/copper pipe, you could wrap the exposed portion of the pipe in heat tape to help speed the thaw. Since metal and water are good conductors of heat, the heat from the tape will spread fairly quickly down the pipe. Or even just use a hair dryer. Not as efficient or quick, but still helpful.


5

I agree with the comment in that its surprising the copper pipe would conduct enough heat to freeze the downstream pipe, are you sure there's not a draft or something like that? Your idea to isolate the pipe seems relatively sound though. You would likely want to use PEX instead of PVC. PEX normally requires a special tool to crimp the connectors, so I ...


5

The key question would be: How many winters has this pipe been like this and lasted without bursting? If it has made it through for many years, it should probably be good for many more. Does it have an indoor valve where you can turn it off and drain the water, similar to this: http://www.homedepot.com/p/Everbilt-3-4-in-Brass-Sweat-x-Sweat-Ball-and-Waste-...


4

I would definitely be worried about remembering to drain the valve, and it's also a pain that you'd have to drain it inside. Your second option is pretty good though, otherwise. Another option, which is probably easier, would be to make up an adapter of sorts for the outside. Take a regular spigot, attach to a 90 degree elbow, and put a hose adapter on the ...


4

Heat pump? Keep salt away from the unit. Salt will attack and totally decompose the fins and will create electrolytic corrosion in the joints between aluminum and copper leading to destruction of the system. Icing during operation in a damp climate is normal, it's supposed to have a defrost cycle it runs through to remove the ice. Heat Pump Operation: ...


4

The bursting is actually caused by the ice. Ice takes up more room than the amount of water it was made from, ultimately bursting through copper. If you had a trickle of water, you may have been better off leaving the taps all open in hopes of keeping the water flowing. Flowing water (even a trickle) is less likely to freeze than standing water. One of the ...


4

Run the pump. If you have a pool cover, put it on. The pool itself stores a lot of heat. Moving water is much harder to freeze than water standing still.


4

It sounds to me like the defrost heaters are not turning off. I can not tell you if yours uses a thermal switch or a timer to cycle them, my guess is for a mechanical switch not working anymore, and stuck in the on position. I am going for the idea that the repair guy thought nothing about the hot sides/top, because it is normal for it to happen, and he ...


4

I eventually fixed the problem, and it turned out to be insufficient water flow to the icemaker. The ice maker was being fed via a clamp-on saddle valve. I closed that off, disconnected it, and soldered in a 1/4" brass line with a 'proper' shut off valve. That provided plenty of flow rate, and since then the icemaker has been working flawlessly.


4

If the cold water supply to the water heater is frozen, there's not going to be much/any pressure to push water through. Typical mobile home freezup is the supply line to the mobile home, not as much the pipes inside the mobile home. The three feet or so between the floor and the ground is a prime area for freezing and usually requires insulation and heat ...


4

This question is about thermal mass/intertia. Suppose you are doing solar panels. The solar energy (from the panel's perspective) is exactly the same 1 hour after sunrise versus 1 hour before sunset. So why is the house so darn cold in the morning and hot in the evening? Because it takes time for temperature to change. Heat energy has to actually move,...


3

Make an insulated, heated enclosure for the paint. Since the paint is already on a wire rack, just insulate the floor and enclose the bottom shelf of the rack. Use a lizard heater and a thermo-cube. Cut and notch OSB, rigid foam insulation and some scrap pegboard to fit on the floor below the shelf. Use scrap vinyl to make a serpentine channel on the ...


3

Are you sure the slab has shifted and it wasn't simply poured that way? The gap appears to be the width of a 2x4 form. Some theories: a form was used along the foundation to pour the slab leaving the gap the house used to have older (thicker) siding/sheathing that was replaced with the vinyl (increasing the visual gap) the gap was put there purposefully. ...


3

What about the following: Replace the existing bibb with an elbow pointing upward Attach a valve with a drain as shown below Add a pipe to the desired height Add an elbow and bibb In the winter, close the lower valve and open the bibb and the drain.


3

Pex in the attic simply needs to be run BELOW the insulation. Put it against the ceiling drywall, and it will never get particularly cold. The problem is, lots of installers don't do this. My contractor actually went to some trouble to hang the pex up high. I had to go through and undo all the clamps and put it down below the insulation, but it wasn't too ...


3

I don't know about Germany, but in the US extension cords are available that have the conductors side-by-side, having an overall flat profile rather than round. Follow Bob's advice to put the cord in at the top, and seal any remaining gap with painter's tape. You should be able to pull it off and reapply it one or two times if you need to open the ...


3

To keep water out of the door lock (knob type) in my gagrage, I split open a tennis ball ("x" cut) tied some twine to it, to attach it to the knob shaft, and put it over the knob. Works great.


3

I live in Alaska. Relax, your pipes aren't going to burst due to 20 degree weather, even if your house wasn't plumbed with cold weather in mind. You don't need to take any preemptive steps beyond turning the main back on and keeping your tap set to "trickle". That's it, wait it out. It'll be fine. Trust me on this one, I know of frozen pipes.


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