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43

Leave a gap and use a cornice(crown) molding to cover it.


28

As long as they are normal screws and you unscrew them they won't compromise the studs or their integrity. If you rip the screws out (with a hammer for example) that could compromise the studs. If you plan on reusing the exact same holes there are things you can do to help future screws grip just as well by adding toothpicks to the holes, but otherwise you ...


22

I think your husband just wants the shoe bins to remain where they are and doesn't want to buy new ones.. LOL. Removing the screws will not damage the studs even if they were load bearing. Patch the holes with a vinyl spackle, sand lightly and you're good to go.


15

Normally rough opening is 2 inches larger then the nominal door size. This leaves approximately 1/4" on each side for shimming to plumb. Some carpenters prefer 2-1/2", leaving a 1/2" gap for shimming. In case framing isn't very precise (say when using unskilled volunteer labor), 1/4" can sometimes be inadequate.


14

If it is not too large of wall I would recommend removing all the old drywall and its fasteners. Then I would shim out the studs with extension strips that even out the wall with the top plate. You may find that not all of these shims are uniform in dimension of any of the studs are bowed or out of plumb. The shims are easily ripped from a 2x4 or 2x6 using ...


13

Good on you for leveling up your knowledge and learning where not to drill or saw on joists. On that same note, here's an excellent summary from BuildingAdvisor titled Guide to Notching and Boring Joists: Don’t make any holes with a diameter greater than 1/3 the depth of a joist. No holes closer than 2 inches to the top or bottom edge. No holes closer than ...


10

A bunch of ways to do this. What I would probably do myself, which is not what you are currently planning, is: Cut a piece of plywood, probably 3/4" thick, 24" tall by ~ 20" (studs 16" apart) or ~ 28" (studs 24" apart). Mount the plywood with 3 screws on each stud. Paint the plywood to match the wall. It doesn't have to be perfect because it will be mostly ...


9

If there is nothing wrong with the pre-existing drywall there is no way I could justify removing it. The ceiling joists look like 2x4's turned on their side? I've never seen anything less than 2x6 upright on the ceiling of a house with drywall. I'm also not sure if my eyes are processing the picture correctly. If it's what I think it is, I would nail/...


8

The cornice molding a la @Jasen really is a good answer, and has to be the easiest. But if you don't want to do that, this is probably the second easiest. (Before you dismiss me as a hack, know that I've done this lots, with good-looking results that have held up for years.) I'm assuming you're going to drywall the ceiling. Get a big roll of fiberglass ...


7

Michael Karas is correct in that a half-height block foundation wall is common, but that doesn't really address your concern about water intrusion. His suggestion to seal the block does, and that wouldn't require the blocks in the first place. I would build your walls with bottom plates of treated lumber one nominal size wider than the walls themselves, ...


7

If you insist on opening the wall, which seems rather foolish to me considering the other options available, I wouldn't install a full-height stud. I'd keep the destruction to a minimum and enjoy a better outcome as a result Open a section of wall slightly taller than the TV mount bracket and to the center of each adjacent stud. Add cross-blocks between ...


7

Yes, you can. It will not affect it structurally, given you are only drilling relatively small (3/4” or so) holes. You won’t want to drill a large plumbing line through it.


6

I would go ahead and open the wall from the side you are planning on replacing. Once you open the wall, you might find out that the drywall has been glued to the studs, in which case your best bet would be to make a clean cut and plan on replacing both sides. If there isn't any glue, you could proceed two ways: Use a magnet to find each screw and back ...


6

It's called "Toenailing". Basically, you drive the nails at an angle through the block to anchor it into the studs on the side. More info can be found at Family Handyman


5

The information I have seen is that the ADA recommendations for grab bars in bath and shower are placement 33" to 36" above the floor of the shower or tub. So the expected height of the shower floor or tub must be added when placing blocking during framing. Be sure the blocking is in the plane of the studs so it does not interfere with drywall placement. ...


5

No, there isn't unless ADA is involved. You should have a copy of your drawings that you can mark up with backing, electrical preferences, and any other concerns. Its entirely up to you, so you should schedule a walk-through specific to that, and another specific to electrical (fixture and device locations). Make estimations at height based on your ...


5

It depends on: The specs for the unit. Some require an air gap and typically have metal protrusions to enforce that spec. Older ones may have called specifically for fire-resistant wall treatments. Local building codes. There may be requirements that disregard and enhance manufacturer requirements and recommendations. The risk tolerance of the builder or ...


5

A "flush beam" is on plane at the bottom with the joists it supports. The joists will typically be supported in one of two ways: Using steel joist hangers attached to the beam: source By resting on the beam with an engineered bearing point protrusion, often consisting of a doubled 2x4 top chord or single upright top chord. source


5

In my state the bottom plate is required to have the foam seal and treated lumber for external load bearing walls only. I do use foam internally but not treated lumber. The foam prevents moisture from wicking into the plate and rotting it. I do use the foam inside but more often I will use tarpaper as I usually have a roll and it works well and is cheaper ...


5

These are larger than 2x6 joists. That plays in your favor. A notch in a 2x6 is disastrous. The beams look OK for now. The cracks are horizontal so they're not concerning. Those can be caused by the drying of the boards or settling, and they could predate the notches. Your best bet is to reroute the pipes and full sister the beam . It has the least ...


5

You’re lucky, sort of... First, the joists are 1 5/8” x 7 1/2” not 1 1/2” x 7 1/4” if the house was built in the 1940’s. Second, the joists are not Redwood (thank goodness) they’re Douglas fir. Third, I’d classify them as No. 1 or Select Structural grade. (There’s only one grade better: Dense Select Structural.) Fourth, those hairline horizontal lines ...


5

First things first. That header is there for a reason. Simply cutting it out could result in crunchy sounds at best, and significant sag at worst (which is difficult to reverse). I'd consider a temporary wall along it to carry the joists above. Use towels as padding to prevent damage. Cut the studs a bit long and drive them in to create lift. What is the ...


4

In my area, they use 20' long 1-1/4" x 11-7/8" LSL for stair stringers. Creating your own stringers with plywood aren't a great idea, half of the plywood plies aren't doing anything when you use them as a beam since every other ply is turned 90 degree when stacking. If you can't find those in your area, then buy 1-3/4" x 11-7/8" LSL. If you can't find that, ...


4

It is fairly common on a flat slab to create a curbing using stubby height concrete blocks. These blocks are typically about 4 to 5 inches in height. When used on a garage (for example) it is typical to place the curbing adjacent to the edge of the slab/foundation. In your case you where you want to inset from the edge of the slab you could choose to apply ...


4

You could use a pair of large clamps close to and flanking the screwhole to prevent the screws from pushing the plies apart. Once the screw is in at full depth the clamp is removed. It might take four clamps--from both edges of the beam. Also you might want to use wax or other appropriate lubricant on the screws and be careful to avoid making the "pilot" ...


4

IMHO - Accept the need to repair drywall on both sides, or fuggedaboutit until you are ready to face that. You could locate the screws with a strong magnet and excavate and unscrew them, but that's still going to need patching and painting. Cockamamie schemes involving cutoff disks come to mind, as does the potential for burning down the house with the ...


4

I have seen this done many time but not 10". The problem with that is any light fixtures would have to be installed in the new ceiling and the wiring from the old fixtures will not reach the new locations so you'd need a junction box in the attic, if you have one, to splice new wire. You could have old knob and tube wiring which could really complicate the ...


3

Looking at the picture it appears that the twisted studs are all shy of the front edge of the bottom plate. If none of the studs are proud / protruding into the space, you could just add new studs/nailing edges as attachment points. I don't see the value of shiming the plates out 1" and adjusting things. If the studs are protruding into the space, I'd ...


3

It shouldn't make any difference. If it isn't any extra work I'd position the studs directly below the ceiling joists. This will make everything just a little stiffer and more solid.


3

I’m glad “you’re going to consult a professional.” I’m sure he’ll check: 1) that all the trusses are identical, including the connectors, 2) there are no additional loads on the trusses over the kitchen area, like air conditioner, etc., 3) the floor beam is just for floor loading, (the wall does not need to sit directly over the beam in order to transfer ...


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