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46

I always wonder “what else is wrong” when there are so many obvious errors. You’ve noted the obvious problems, but you’ve probably missed some major items that are not so obvious: In Picture #1 you’ve noted the gap issue, but missed the “double spliced sole plate”. (Splices are to be a minimum of 4’ apart, unless at intersection of a wall.) In Picture #1 ...


22

It's probably a good time to review the contract you entered with the framers. Does it allow you to withhold payment until defects are resolved? Does it stipulate how claimed defects are to be resolved? Do what the contract requires of you to ensure that you don't end up in breach too. There appears to be a pattern of careless work and failure to abide the ...


16

Yes, that is shoddy work! Did you pay for shoddy work or did you pay for quality work? But things like this turn into squeaks, cracks, wobbles, etc. over time. So yes, if this was MY project I would get them back in to do it properly!


16

Horrible work. I don't think "I commissioned an independent review" will hold any weight with the contractor, unless the contract allowed for that. The contractor might dispute the qualifications of your reviewer. Instead, I would contact the local city planning office (who gave you the planning permission), and ask them for an inspection. If they say that ...


10

Structural engineer and former carpenter and contractor here. Check your plan general notes for your code and other criteria to which your contractor's quality of work must meet. Discuss with your building official, or a local structural engineer for advice and direction. From what I see in your pictures after a very quick precursory review, it appears ...


9

Yes, and I'd question your town inspector as to whether or not that would pass. You're looking at loads of problems down the way. Birdsmouth cuts are a PITA but after you do them a few hundred times they're easier. No excuse. And every single one of those 2x4s that aren't framed solid are going to move in time, causing cracks, settling, squeaks, and ...


7

That actually looks pretty well supported the way you did it. If you haven't straightened the rods that bent, you should try to do so. Also, if you have any duct tape, put a strip of it on each end and one down the middle to help hold those planks in place. Good luck and stay safe.


5

I could give you some easy tips on adjusting the door and jamb but I would only do that if there wasn't the option to - make the frame bigger (rough opening). You can plane off 1/4" on one of the sides in about 5-10 minutes and you won't be messing with the integrity of the door you bought. You can plane sloppy and with shims you are still good to go.


5

Licensed and insured contractor, been building homes for the last decade or so. That beam in the last Pic is sitting on lvl studs, not plywood. They're much stronger than regular 2x material and that strap is kinda hiding the end of the top plate but technically all it needs is 3/4" bearing to be structurally sound. That gap in pantry king stud, while ugly, ...


2

Harper and Ed are right. Good answers. But Inspectors are kings. You were the jackass (no offense as I think all of us including me were the jackass to a "overzealous" inspector). Here is the deal there are generally no rules unless you are in a city big enough that has multiple head inspectors. I doubt Clearwater fits that - I am sure there is ...


2

First & Foremost, Let's reevaluate what you are Asking a 1920 house has 2"x4" Bearing wall studs 16" O.C & 2"x8" (Guessing 16" O.C as well,Sometimes their 19.2" O.C.) Nominal Lumber. Today's lumber is 1-1/2"x 3-1/2" and 1-1/2" x 7-1/4". You are not Specifying the distance of Door Movement or the Loads Transferring Down.There is a Lot to Consider ...


2

Why don't you just make the opening for the door oversized, bear the studs down onto joists and then fill in the portion that you don't want as door. Add 24" to the span of the header for the door.


2

With a beam nearly directly under and supporting the joists that are supporting the wall, all you need to do is provide blocking to transfer the load of the trimmer and king posts to the beam below. 2" bearing is enough (the depth of the studs is for other factors and the full 3-1/2" width is not needed here) This because the loads on the wall haven't ...


2

That should be just fine. A few points for clarity: Use substantial (joist-size) lumber. These are essentially joists themselves. I wouldn't go smaller than 2x6. Consider using joist hangers or lag screws. Sheer nails don't meet modern code in a load-bearing situation like this--either at the ends or into the existing beam. You might double them to give ...


2

Any gap under the king stud or anywhere in framing is a result of the framer doing crappy work, because everything in framing has to be on the line and flush and tight. If it's not then the house will shrink and creak, and drywall will crack.


2

One option to consider would be a set of pillars under each individual floor board, wedged or glued firmly in place, perhaps only secured on the bottom to allow for thermal movement. This concept extended within my grey matter to suggest a plank running across all the floor boards, but with holes across the span to provide for the airflow. The pillars ...


1

I have a similar home, and encountered a different issue, but similar. The headers in my house were true, single 2x6 pine. When I opened up my first floor, and found my headers looked like smiley faces, I knew I had to fix them. Everything is now 2.0 3.5"×12" lvl. Money well spent in my opinion, as the house will now last another 100 years without concern. ...


1

We run into this all the time. As already mentioned, simply frame the opening oversize so the studs align with the joists below. Everything placed under the header is then non-load bearing, and you can add additional framing to make to doorway RO, without structural concerns.


1

There are exceptions, but typically walls parallel with the joists are non bearing. The exception will be if it is carrying a load from above, transferred down by another wall above it, carrying the roof or corner of a roof, or something like that. Also a point load from above can be brought down through a non-bearing wall.


1

You need to define the type of garage ceiling you're looking to use. Not all trusses can be used for downward forces (say it keeps the walls from spreading) and if you're accidentally mis-describing them you could be getting some bad advice. That said, assuming your climbing wall touches the ground the load will be carried there. Lateral forces on the side ...


1

Your studs and framing should be fine. You need to screw into the existing studs and odds are that the pull up bar won't do a direct attachment very well connection bigger than the width of the stud. Also, the current framing layout will dictate where you place it. Your idea of attaching a board to the wall and the pull up bar to it are a good one and what ...


1

I'm not an HVAC guy so I don't know the CFM requirements but I believe that you could use 2x4 blocking that would leave over 3-1/2" depth should be plenty for air flow. Assuming that you are comfortable with that air flow, use 2x4 blocking with Simpson A35 clips and screws for attachment. You might be an extension on your power driver to reach the far side. ...


1

At the minimum all gaps need to be filled underneath With a piece of lath or piece of plywood as long as its solid underneath the entire width and langth of the beam or king stud or cripple its sitting on . it will pass structural if those are filled and prevent sagging in the future hurrrican strap should have been nailed to a 2ft piece of 2x10 and 2x10 ...


1

I am not seeing these caveats at all. There is a Canadian company that makes a product called a T-Stud which consist of two 2x3's and dowels. If this can be done to replace a 2x6 and is four times stronger I don't see why a I-Joist system couldn't be used to build a stud the same way without the complication of drilling and doweling all these holes for the ...


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