Hot answers tagged

8

That is not normal or acceptable workmanship. The correct response to a foundation that far out of specification is to require the foundation contractors to rip it out and try again, or not get paid. Clearly that point was missed. The larger problem for you is that you are already entered into a contract with an incompetent, lying builder. I'd have your ...


8

Miter the ends of the tubing itself and then weld the corners.


8

Router bits have to be carefully checked against the type of cut being created. For the general cut there is a correct feed direction and there is an incorrect direction. For some bits used in a certain way there is no ideal cut direction. The general principal is that the work piece should be fed into the router bit so that the incoming wood is pushing ...


8

The two options that come to mind are as follows: Rip out the wood and replace it This is the traditional way to approach the issue. This is labor intensive, but taking the time to remove all of the rotten material is usually the best way to go. Remember, you're just seeing the surface rot. There might be more damage inside. The sooner you get to that ...


8

Unfortunately you are past the point where you could have installed a stud in that corner as a nailer. What you are saying is that you have unsupported drywall butting into the corner now. You certainly can try a longer screw, but be careful not to bend the drywall as the screw tightens. There is going to be a tendency for that corner to wave if you screw it ...


7

For the sistered stud, it makes no difference. All the load is transfered to the adjacent stud and there won't be any movement if you use enough screws and the adjacent stud is properly installed. For the other side, just make sure the stud is resting firmly against the base plate and screw it down, leaving any slack between the stud and top plate. If there'...


5

To add stability you could use 2x6 members for the cross pieces along the bottom. Then cover the bottom with a half of a sheet of plywood. Pour concrete into the box thus formed at the base by the 2x6's and plywood. You could get by without having to go all the way to full angle braces across the sides (which would get in the way of your hanging plants ...


4

I would worry about the structure being top heavy. But I would also worry about it turning into a parallelogram and pancaking. Without any diagonal supports, it's very easy for that structure to pull out a few nails and the corners would then act like hinges until it's flat to the ground. Either way, I'd worry that under a light breeze or someone leaning ...


4

I'd use picture wire between the two D-rings to hang the picture. Leave some slack in the wire, as that will give you some scope for adjustment to make sure it can hang level. Usually, I'd suggest picture hooks, but with insulation in front of the plasterboard, my suggestion would be to drive decent length screws into the studs, leaving the head protruding ...


4

thank you so much for the advice and comments. The inspectpr came by yesterday and confirmed our concerns! He is going to fail the framing inspection and has provided a write up for all the items we were questioning. Keeping our eyes peeled for any issues moving forward.


3

If it is a split jamb it will not matter it will gauge itself to the wall thickness. If it is not, and you have an older home with 3 5/8" studs circa 1950-60's with 1/2 sheetrock, you will need the wider jamb. If it is a newer home, you may be able to go with the narrower jamb. The biggest downside to a smaller jamb, is there may be a gap that can occur at ...


3

It looks neat. I think I'd be looking for a glass railing engineer (as in an engineer employed by a firm in the business of glass railings or engineered/architectural glass structures in general) to ensure that the glass, mounting and attachments were all adequate. And I like doing stuff myself. I'd just be uncomfortable with the possibilities for building ...


3

I see damage to sill (under window), brick mold (covers/protects L/R window edge). Not shown but certainly contributing is the flashing/dripedge/overhang ABOVE window. If rot extends through sill and there wasn't proper waterproofing UNDER the sill and above the basic framing, your wall below the window is at risk. This looks like a replacement window ...


3

If I were a buyer I would beware. Why is the house frame not firmly on the foundation? 2" off the slab is more than half the width of the 2x4 base of a wall.


3

Edit: You are looking for a 2x6 aluminum tube. This should be pretty much have the same physical properties as a pine 2x6 (which looks like what you have in the lower picture). In the upper picture, it looks like two 2x2s that are sandwiched together. I would think that a single 2x4 tube would be fine to replace that, unless it needs that sandwich ...


3

Centre rail feet are not supposed to touch the floor. If they do, they interfere with the flex of the slats. They’re only there to prevent the slats breaking when folks initially get into bed - or jump on the bed. Or... 😬🙈 Generally, they should be a centimetre or so off the floor. Most centre rail breakages occur when people adjust the centre rail feet ...


2

EDIT 2013-05-18: Because it would be super easy, quick, cheap, and sound-deadening, I think the way to go is a cement door skinned in masonite/plywood with styrofoam pillows, built as I sketched out below. On one or both sides, Green Glue a second skin of 1/8" sheeting if desired. Still, if you are set on the steel tubing and MDF, another way join the ...


2

Depending on your taste, and the number of pictures you'll be hanging. Here are a few other options... Picture Rail Picture rail is a type of molding that is installed around the top of the room, about 7-9 feet above the floor. You then use picture wire, and picture rail hooks to hang pictures. Many different types of hooks can be found, from very ...


2

That appears to be a concealed overhead door stop. You might have to search around a bit to find the right style and size - if you know the manufacturer of the door you can try there to see if they sell replacement parts.


2

This is perfectly fine. There is in fact a whole building science based protocol for not using double top plates or double studs even on structural walls. If the name comes back to me I'll provide a link to it. Advanced Framing. Developed 40+ years ago and still not accepted by half the carpenters who learned from daddy who learned from daddy who...learned ...


2

Just to add what Ecnerwal is saying - and he is 100% correct - I often use pocket doors in basements with lower clearance. You can screw pocket door frame directly to the joists and save and inch or two.


2

Please keep in mind that headers are made to absorb some of the twist and vibration when someone decides a door needs to be slammed, leaned against to keep out little/big brother/sister, and other abuse. I would build as you suggested, and if it becomes a wall cracking/splitting issue near the door frame, then make a header with a double 2x4 or 2x6 instead ...


2

Personally I would feel a lot safer using an A-frame. If your kids are anything like I was at their age, they're going to be swinging with all they've got. Plus, consider the weight of the tire (it's not nothing). Add all that force together and you would be putting a not inconsiderable amount of force on the posts. Plus, if they swing at an angle, they ...


2

It looks like the casing sustained most of the damage. It appears to be aged pine or fir. The challenge will be finding a matching profile. You may need to replace the casing on the entire opening face so that the three pieces match. Look for a molding with the same width as the original and a profile of similar style. Depth isn't critical as long as it's ...


2

It would be a mistake to install any window or door tightly in the framing. Houses move, and units installed tightly can get bound up and/or damaged. Your window should be installed level and square by shimming the bottom and sides. It's usually best to not shim the top in case the framing above settles. The rough opening should be about 1 inch larger than ...


2

Long (3") screws (3 or 4) through the jamb into the framing of the house should do it. Be careful not to drive them too tight; otherwise you'll warp the jamb and the door will fit loosely. In a perfect world, you'd predrill the jamb with a drill bit big enough that the screw goes through it readily (but not too loose). If you have the same problem on the ...


2

The 45 deg cut gives more surface area for glue if you glue and more strength , 90,s are easy and can be nailed or glued but any paralyx (not totally square) will show more and be weaker than a 45. I have done both in the past but 45's look professional and last longer. Just look at your door frames, sliding screen doors and you will find 45's not 90's


2

The center post do normally touch this supports the slats and keeps the frame level. It is difficult to tell how far off the floor this is there could have been a plastic foot at one time. I would use something solid like an old phone book if you can find one, or a piece of wood.


2

I'd be cautious with anything holding up the top level that's not a bolt going all the way through the wood. The Ikea stuff tends not be overbuilt at all, so the wouldn't be a lot of extra wood to screw into to get a good hold. The extra braces are fine, but if it was my kid sleeping in the bed, I wouldn't want to rely only on some screws in <= 1" thick ...


2

Trim molding will not hold a standard hinged door. It would take a skilled carpenter to move a hinged door outward. What part of the machines is preventing them being pushed further back? Could it be simply the dryer vent hose is interfering? Compare the specifications on the machines to the dimensions of your space. Is the washer hitting your back ...


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