5

Hmmm...no digging in the ground and no concrete. Sounds like the four perimeter beams will be your foundation. They’ll need to be treated for ground contact (pressure treated) as you indicate. Your total load will be about 220 lbs. (Live Load) as you indicate, plus about 800 lbs. in lumber and material (Dead Load). I did not add snow load as I’d assume ...


2

Having dug footings before by hand (2-man auger, clamshell digger and shovel) I would definitely suggest the Dingo for this project. I did 5 with the auger and 2 with clamshell (because it was near utility lines) but 20 footings is a lot and you should keep this simple and quick, letting the machine do most of the work. Note- clamshell post-hole digger ...


2

If your posts are pressure treated, you can set the concrete level to grade. If the posts are not pressure treated, I would set the top of concrete at 8" above grade. more would not hurt. Also use metal fasteners that hold the post up off the concrete 1" in either case.


2

I'm answering from Australia so building practices may be different. I'd call your builder and insist that he come back and install the footings properly. Post brackets are expressly to keep the posts above ground so the bottoms do not rot. Installing them below ground is not a very good idea. Edit This need not be a difficult fix but it is my strong ...


1

There are two grades of pressure treated lumber: 1) Above Ground Use, and 2) Ground Contact. 1) Above Ground Use is used for deck railings, building wall sole plates, etc. 2) Ground Contact lumber can be on the ground or in the ground. If your concrete piers are within 6” of the ground, they are considered “Ground Contact Use” by the Code. Ground ...


1

You need lots of fill dirt. Put about 3-4" or more right underneath the deck. Than add lots of dirt to the area outside the deck. Grade down away from the deck and divert the water toward that area of your yard that almost looks like a ditch. Once you get your grade set, throw out some tall fescue grass seed (or whatever you like) and cover it with straw. ...


1

If you're building something that is hard to tip over, it needs to be wide and heavy. Your poles unfortunately have a huge lever arm compared to the base. The weight of your base multiplied by its radius needs to be more than the tension in the sail cloth multiplied by the height of the pole. If you have a 6' pole and a 16" wide base, the leverage works ...


1

It will be very hard to give guidance as to if a particular size of base will be adequate for your application. Here are some of the variables to consider: Length of the metal pipe that holds the sail cloth. The longer (and presumed higher) this pole the more lateral leverage it can apply to the base. Span of the sail cloth overhead. The longer span you ...


1

I doubt you can get the broken off posts out and new 4x4 posts in with the holes intact. In one case on this site the poster had clean holes and put in steel posts which are smaller enough in diameter than the original wood posts that they could be inserted plumb into the existing retaining wall. If your concrete is relatively weak, you might be able to ...


1

It depends on what you call permanent Increasing entropy is really the only thing that's permanent. Although you can't say with certainty how long something will last, you do have the ability to influence longevity. Some sticks shoved into the ground are destined for early failure and steel reinforced 12" diameter x 6' 6000 psi concrete will surely be ...


1

I would not use sand or rock the hole will hold water, I might clean the holes out this summer and fill with fresh concrete to above grade. I put fence posts in with this method (just concrete around the post and sloped away from the post) and they last 20 year's or more.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible