3

After reading Jimmy Fix-it answer I decided to give it a try to modify the Model 9000 fixture for installation of LED tubes in the Model 9000 fixture rather than throwing it away, and found the way to do it, as explained below. The end caps are two-part plastic sections held together and mounted to the metal chassis of the fixture by plastic tabs. Besides a ...


3

First, Are you entirely sure this is a fluorescent fixture and not an integrated LED fixture? Because it's awfully, awfully thin for a fluorescent. The only tubes I can imagine even having a chance of fitting are T5s (5/8" diameter). However, fluorescent fixtures never require tools to get the tubes out. IF this was fluorescent - and it's very much ...


3

The dangers of mercury in CFLs and other fluorescent bulbs has been sensationalized in some news sources. The main health risk associated with mercury is the vapor released when it is heated or if a large quantity is sitting around evaporating into the air for some reason. Very little mercury is absorbed by your body if you swallow a small amount of ...


2

Yeah, that's just a wacky "feature" of this particular type of tombstone. Yes, that little black sleeve rotates independently from the white tombstone. In theory, it's supposed to be impossible for it to be in that position - since you would have had to turn it 90 degrees to remove the tube. However, if the tube broke or was cleverly removed in some ...


2

As requested: modern electronic ballast have safety circuits that shut them down when the lamps are drawing two much current. Replacing weak lamps may solve the problem.


2

Modern flourescent fittings, compact or otherwise, have a small amount of mercury vapour in them. This will have escaped when the fitting broke. You may have breathed an infinitesimally small amount of it in. This amount of vapour is so small, that any possible effects are negligible. As there was no liquid mercury in the fitting, there's not anything to ...


2

I have the same issue. The Keystone KTEB-232RIS-1-TP-SL ballast is not compatible with the Feit T48/840/LED/2 tube. I have four Lithonia Lighting fixtures I just purchased only to learn the Keystone ballast is not compatible with these Feit lamps. I've had good luck with Feit products. This is a compatibility issue.


2

Most of those need you to grip both long sides of the plastic cover and squeeze then push one side back into the groove and drop the other edge out. If it is old, then be careful as some plastics go brittle... Another option is to use a prying tool (small screwdriver or flat blade and gently work along.


2

These fixtures are usually wired so that the (2) outside bulbs and the (2) inside bulbs are wired together. Yes both bulbs need to be inserted in the sockets to light-up. Also the 4 foot bulbs with (2) terminal pins need to be turned so that they lock in place and contact the terminals carrying the voltage. Usually a 1/4 turn or until resistance to turning ...


1

Depending on the ballast type the lamps need to go through a “start cycle”. Live swap is not the best thing for a ballast and although not usually dangerous it’s never a good idea to change out lamps live. What is the start cycle, when a ballast is first fired the voltage spikes depending on the type well over 300v until the gas in the tube ionizes and ...


1

I'm a big fan of hanging shop lights, and I like the fluorescent form-factor. I get them with cords on them. I have a very cheap way of doing that. Fluorescent lights like that are practically being given away on Craigslist. I grab them, and swap out the ratty old magnetic ballast for a spiff new electronic ballast from a top vendor like GE, ($12-25) ...


1

Yes you can replace your spiral lights with 4’ fluorescent fixtures. A 15 amp circuit can handle quite a few of those 2 or 4 lamp fixtures. The average 4’ only consumes ~32w or 128w for a 4lamp fixture you could put almost a dozen of those fixtures on a 15 amp circuit. Consider led, I convert my T8 & t12 lamps to led lamps more visible light and less ...


1

I agree; it sounds like a blown ballast to me. As Ed Beal suggests, if the ballast is rapid-start (2 wires per tube end) the imbalance of some LEDs some real fluorescent may have caused it undue stress. Or perhaps the ballast was starting to get marginal on its own, and using LEDs forestalled the problem until it deteriorated more. I'd roll it back to real ...


1

Both tubes were really stuck in a fixture with minimal space to grab the bulbs, I tried a strip of Duck Tape on both ends, but still would not budge. I then sprayed the pins at each end with WD-40 and pulled slightly on the Duck Tape again. They Moved! then they easily popped right out. ShaZamm! Duck Tape and WD-40 come through again! Of course, I was also ...


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