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If you have a starter, that is definately bad. Starters are cheap and easy to install, I can't remember the last time I have seen one. (Electronic ballast don't use starters). Since the lamp appears to be bright the ballast should be good. If there is no starter I would look at the ends of the lamp, the other thing that kills fliorescents is the electrodes ...


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Fluorescent tubes have 2 pins because each end isn't just an electrode, it's also a preheating filament. This helps the arc to initially strike, with less wear-and-tear on the tube (longer tube life). You have chosen rapid-start ballasts, which start the tube after a very short delay, which is used to stretch bulb life. The other options on the menu are ...


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Yes, the fixture is stuck in start mode. It's preheating both ends, but it's not striking. If it has a starter, replace it. However, if it doesn't, or if the starter doesn't fix it, it's the ballast (the bulky part which limits the current passing through the fluorescent bulb). If you're at the point of replacing the ballast, the replacement ballast ...


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It's a gx23-2 base for a 13w cfl like this:


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A quick search of ballasts revealed electronic ballasts that support (2) F15T8. Go straight to that, don't waste any time with old magnetic ballasts that buzz and flicker on a good day. An instant-start ballast does that by shocking the tubes lit, but this wears the tubes faster. It typically needs 3 wires for a 2-tube setup, and they can run ...


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First off, these lights are not designed to work with only one bulb. That will cause premature failure of the ballasts. Those three little "boxes" in the base are ballasts. The ballasts sends the proper amount of electricity to the fluorescent bulbs. The ballasts provides enough voltage to start the fluorescent bulbs, and once they are started, it quickly ...


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Why this often doesn't work The #1 reason this fails is that the ballas-- hold on. The #1 reason is that Feit Electric is a bunch of junk. Along with Utilitech and Lights of America, these are brands to be avoided. All of them use the "Chinese dumping" business model of disgorge staggering quantities of hastily built lights of cheap parts with little QA - ...


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Chances are that it's the bulb, and not the ballast. It takes two good bulbs to get light. Swap bulbs around see if this eliminates the problem. Bulbs are fairly cheap. You don't need fancy ones, just your basic 10,000 hour one. Start with getting two new one bulbs. Put this pair in each fixture in turn. Write "B" on the white metal ballast cover if ...


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The option that I use for this type of thing is to add light with portable lighting fixtures. These are extremely handy for adding lots of light in a localized area where you want to perform some work. I use two types. Halogen Work Light Picture Source These output a tremendous amount of light. The wire cage on the front is there to protect from burns as ...


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Do not use plug-n-play LEDs - they depend on a functioning ballast and your ballast is suspect. Because then, you'd be at a crossroads. Return the plug-n-play and remove the ballast and get a direct-wire/ballast-bypass LED... Or replace the ballast and stay with PnP and support that ballast forever, even though LEDs don't actually need it. Obviously the ...


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Change it to an electronic ballast There's nothing wrong with fluorescent lights inherently. However the early fluorescents relied on a design which was before electronics (and therefore, before anyone cared about line noise). Fortunately, electronic ballasts came along in the 1990's, and they made things much better. It isn't hard to make an electronic ...


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Does the tube have ends that are getting dark? Fluorescent tubes fail by taking more and more voltage to start, until the ballast can't anymore. The difficulty is because the conductive material that should be helping the tube start is now darkening the tube ends. Obviously if there is a swappable starter, it's the starter. Otherwise, it's the ballast.


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I have never seen just the ends being sold. I have seen "bare" fixtures ie no ballast for ~10$ at places like 1000bulbs.com I believe they came with t8/t12 style non shunted tombstones.


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I am only guessing here ... I'd describe them as tombstone bases if I were ordering over the phone. Maybe "tombstone brackets"? Sounds more official. Wouldn't it be cheaper and less trouble simply to buy a new complete fixture?


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Your terminology is correct: they're called tombstone (or bi-pin) fluorescent lampholders. In particular, those in the photo are locking or turn-type, a nice safety feature that makes it less likely for a lamp to fall out of the socket. A search at Amazon.com for Fluorescent Tombstone Lampholder found more than 30 similar devices. N.B. There are two types, ...


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The Installation Guide contains important information and notes regarding the installation and operation of the InstantFit T8 lamps. Please note the important points below: Philips InstantFit T8 LED lamps are suitable to replace T12 fluorescent lamps Philips InstantFit T8 LED lamps require non-shunted G13 (medium bi-pin) lamp holders (tombstones) Philips ...


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