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If that is a floating laminate floor it really should be left alone. Scribing and cutting the baseboard (skirting) would have been best, but to caulk the gap, which is the other alternative would bond the flooring to a degree to the flooring and not allow it to move as it needs. The shoe mold is an idea that is used but has is drawbacks, it is typically ...


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If skirting board by itself isn't sufficient then you can add a length of quarter round as well.


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Stud finders are usually unable to find wood joists under thick wood floors. They are for drywall. Friction noises depend where noise really comes from, not where you step. In one house with plywood then oak hardwood, it was the joist & X pieces . Polyurethane tube of sub-floor adhesive to an open basement ceiling joist edges applied like sealant fixed ...


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The 1/4" layer is useless. I'd remove it. You'll need a proper decoupling layer (Ditra or a generic alternative) between the subfloor and the tiles. The thin plywood will add flexibility where no flexibility is needed and can cause the grout to crack.


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It really depends : How out of flat are your floors? Have you taken a 10' straight edge around the room to get the flooring and found the largest difference? How picky are you, if the floor has some bounce/flex when walking on it is that a deal breaker? The constraints are there to give you a high quality installation. Glue down won't work if the floor ...


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If your plywood floor is in good condition, I would drive screws to securely attach it to your floor beams. When I did my floor, I saw they were attached with nails which was not ideal even though I had no squeeky issue.


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Remember, the maximum difference between risers is 3/8” from smallest to largest by Code. (See ICC R311.5.3.1)


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Another option: Self levelling low-spots only, and optionally adding plywood to smoothen the rest. "self levelling" cement is not liquid as you think and you can apply it in patches without worrying that it will run like water. You have some troweling time to work low areas as large as say 5x5 ft.


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No, there isn't. You'll want to follow a common strategy of either running a full tile or a joint down the center of the room so that the rows at the edges look appropriate. Snap one or two chalk lines on the floor as references, then snap one or two at 90 degrees to get your joint lines straight. With a wet saw these types of cuts are not difficult nor time ...


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With the hearing bone pattern you start in the center. Make all angled cuts the same or it will show to a trained eye at 20’ everyone else will notice something wrong. Any deviation in the room is taken up in the border you can hide a 1/2” out of square room with the border and it can be hard to detect but have the same deviation in your angled cuts and it ...


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Levelling compound is your pal. Use it to get the whole floor level. whatever else you do will come back to haunt you. Whether the carpet is free standing or stretched wall-to-wall, it needs to be on a flat, level surface, with no dips deeper than 1/8" over a square foot - and that's pushing it. Underlay may give a little leeway, and indeed, is worth ...


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