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Wow sure that floor would bounce. Rip up the old tile and use plywood decking. I can’t remember if you can get 3/4 in t&g but know you can get 1”. Since the strips are not t&g I would want to go thicker if possible. If not use a lot of construction adhesive and screw the plywood down. Next step is your backer board. (I usually put thinset or ...


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I have engineered hardwood with a thin veneer of maple. The wood layer wore off in heavily used areas. It get scratches easily from my dogs. The factory coating is not sufficient on my engineered wood. I read it is best to apply polyurethane about 2-3 times over the engineered wood. That way it also seals the gaps in between boards. It does make it less ...


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It depends how out of flat your slab is and how perfect you want the installation. The slab doesn't have to be level but it should be flat. You'd need to remove the carpet and use a straight edge and look for gaps while moving the straight edge around the room. Generally it doesn't matter how new the house is - slabs are never perfect. Door bottoms can ...


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What is the typical difference in height between levels C and 5? NONE- the top of the floorboards should be at the same height. Any slight difference between the height of the laminate and carpet is dealt with by using a transition bar. Your floor coverings are temporary and will be removed and replaced eventually (perhaps when the next owner restores that ...


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Use a A992-50 W10x19 steel beam. Edit: A comment asked for more than a single sentence answer. The OP's question wasn't confusing. By saying it's a 8000# uniform load over 21 feet, he's telling us that it's 381# per lineal foot. 381# multiplied by 10.5 feet is 4000#, that's why he said there's 4000# at each end. This beam will deflect L/384, or about 0.66" ...


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In a previous life around 1976 we moved an 80 year old chapel with hardwood floors to a new site. Between the age, inexpensive initial hardwood, and the move there were many wide cracks in the floor. The contractor (who built Fort Edmonton) had us mix fine sawdust (from sanding the floor -- so the sawdust was already part varnish) with varnish and stuff ...


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From what I can tell at your links, the epoxy in use is designed to remain quite flexible, so there should be no problem with thermal or humidity - related expansion of the planks. FWIW a part-time contractor I know has recommended using fine-grain sand to fill such cracks. It's easy to install, and easy to replace if you don't like the color.


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Thanks all for the info and suggestions. I am laying 3/4" T&G solid Hickory. I will start at the back/exterior wall and work my way toward the walls with the doors - measuring carefully to make sure I don't end up at the bathroom door with a sliver or some kind of weird situation at the hallway door. I am hoping the room is more square than it is flat ...


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Insulated slabs usually have vapor barrier underneath. Since you did a test and found no moisture, there should be no problem installing vinyl flooring on it.


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