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3

When my son was little, we had a few accidents that we didn't find out until it had set. Carpet cleaners used to clean up animal urine worked great to neutralize it. I don't know about actually being "clean"; it never made sense to me that you wouldn't want to carpet clean it after neutralizing it. Personally, I've had best success with Folex ...


2

They make sealers that add friction to the surface. Search for something like "Anti Slip Penetrating Sealer". Just pick a product for your tile and follow application instructions.


1

Ended up removing the existing leveling concrete, putting down primer, then adding a poured leveling compound, then a Ditra decoupling membrane, and finally tiling over the top. here is a better pic of the starting surfaces: And then the leveling compound (notice the green laser helping us maintain the gravity level of the compound): And Finally, DITRA ...


0

It's not an issue. Once you leave the edge gap for your flooring it only spans maybe 3/4" over the voids for an inch or two. You'll never notice it. If it bothers you, fill the voids with almost any cement patch you can find. Basement slabs don't typically get expansion joints. I don't see one here. There's evidence of slab shrinkage, which is normal ...


1

put some paper or plastic sheet down the crack against the wall then fill the holes with leveling compound, or builders filler.


2

First I would tap all the pieces together so the joints are tight. Then I would go to the end of the run (the end where all the extra space is now) and pull up the transition strip or shoe molding that hides that end. Depending on how much space there is between that last plank and the wall, put in a small spacer followed by a dab or two of an elastomer ...


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I'd venture to guess that turning on the basement heat pump at 300+% efficiency would beat running electric resistance heat at 100% efficiency, and requires no additional install expense.


1

What you do depends on how strong you need the shed to be. if you're in a hurricane zone you'll want everything tied together with straps and bolts etc. If you're in a tornado zone there's not much you can do. For anchoring a joist to a beam below it use the twisted "joist straps". joist hangers are for butt joints. then you need to anchor the ...


3

I've built and owned several such sheds that didn't even have the benefit of lying on sleepers. They were both placed directly on washed rock beds. I didn't use steel reinforcement for either, and I haven't seen issues over the 20 years I've used the sheds (nor would I expect any). The only time you'd see such movement is if 1) the shed is somehow subjected ...


2

Oak - more lines (harsh), texture, example Walnut - several species are used but the have more of a wavy, "rock hit water" texture. Black walnut Traditional American


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