We’re rewarding the question askers & reputations are being recalculated! Read more.
30

Wood flooring is usually installed with a gap to the actual wall - this is important, because it allows for differences in expansion/contraction between the flooring and the materials used to frame the building. If you tried to make a perfect tight fit, the floor would either buckle, crack, or pull away from the wall. The gap is typically covered with trim (...


17

There are several factors to consider. Buckling would be the least concern if the hardwood floors are installed properly. I would lay the floors first and then install the cabinets. I have been involved in the construction of hundreds of new homes and we have always laid the hardwood floors first. Appliances - The height of the cabinets needs to be 36 ...


15

This is called VCT, Vinyl Composition tile. It's normally installed with adhesive and maintained with various cleaners and polishes. It's very common in commercial installations.


15

Software would be nice, but setting up your room diagram is probably more work than just trying your layout in reality. Plus, there's no substitute for actually seeing it in place. I usually do this: Lay a row of tiles down the center of the long axis of the room. Don't forget to space them as you intend to do with the final floor. At key locations, run ...


14

The flooring is supposed to extend far enough under the door trim molding so that no sub-floor is visible. The gap you have is non-standard and is completely unacceptable. Presumably you have some scraps of flooring left. The installer should scrape out the filler and insert a piece of flooring into the gap. EDIT To be able to work in the scrap of ...


14

While re-doing the floor to go under the trim would be desirable, a hack might make things worse. My best suggestion is a square edge plinth block to cover the mess. Maybe you'll have to do that with a few adjacent doors to match up, but it's an extremely easy fix.


9

What I would do is take up and replace that area. You should have some wood left over from install--check your attic or garage. Installers usually leave a box for repair because the color dye lot will never be the same over time. If you don't have any then remove some from a closet or under staircase or pantry. Replace that area with plywood or a flooring of ...


8

When you say "bite down" do you mean: It actually goes through the layer beneath the newly laid 1/4" plywood and simply spins as though it's stripped and will not counter sink, or It will not even sink far enough for the head of the screw to even touch the new layer of plywood? If it's option 1, are you using a wood screw or machine screw? A machine screw (...


8

All the underlayments I have used for laminate are flexible. With a flexible base your tile will crack and the grout will crumble, not in years time but with each step. So I would say No you can not use this as a base for your tile.


7

I had two floors to do once and between coats I used a broom with 3 bits of fine sanding paper taped to the broom head - cheap, cheerful and effective... Also, had to punch down the floor brads (nails) so they were below the surface... Those floors came up magic but also vacuumed after sanding to remove the dust...


7

You could use a hand-held orbital- like you mentioned the biggest downside is time. But you're correct, sanding between coats of poly isn't stripping an old floor- it's just scuffing up the previous coat of poly in preparation for the next one. Even easier for this step though would probably be a pole sander- like the kind for drywall seams. Use a fine ...


6

I ended up ripping the laminate boards lengthwise using my jigsaw and fitting them in like Jim suggested. I used some cardboard to cut out the shape that the long pieces should be and then drew across the edge of the cardboard piece on the laminate boards. It worked out quite well I think and I hope there won’t be any structural support issues. The ...


6

Spax Multi Material Construction Screws are what I use the most. They come in different types but the first two in the photo below will countersink 1/4" plywood easily.


6

You're going to need two tools to do this and two specialty blades. A diamond cut-off disc to make the majority of the cut attached to a grinder. And you'll need a diamond (if available) or carbide-tipped oscillator bit and the corresponding oscillating tool ( sometimes called a multi-tool). For the majority of the cut you will use that diamond cut off disc ...


6

These nailers are made to handle solid wood flooring and thick subfloors. Your engineered floor is much easier to nail, and you may have a pretty "soft" subfloor as well (not a bad thing, necessarily, just saying that it accepts nails pretty easily). The max PSI is important because that is the MOST the tool can handle without blowing seals, etc. Don't ...


5

The 1/4" plywood is not the problem if the screws won't "bite". The problem is the material under the plywood which is probably very thin and could be deteriorated especially in a trailer or mobile home. Screws are the right thing to use. Stapes or nails would pull out. There are special screws made to put down cement board under tiles that have flat ...


5

Definitely flooring first! Your ends do not have to be perfect that go under the cabinets, so if you have boards with bad ends or flaws, they can be placed so that flaw is hidden by the cabinet. I'm 6' something and every 1/4" of higher cabinets counts, so I'd do it just for the fact the cabinets are not 3/4" shorter/sunk in. Some appliances allow you to ...


5

Without pictures, if there's floor joists/subfloor under the carpet/hardwood/vinyl, etc., it sounds like it would be as simple as just "framing it in". In other words, you'd just add some 2x4s on 16" centers (with top and bottom plates - kind of like a 2x4 wall that is just placed horizontally) that would raise it to the level you want. Note that 2x4s are ...


4

You don't have to, but there's not a great alternative to prevent gaps from showing. An "undercut saw" can be rented cheaply at your local tool rental shop. It's basically a circular saw with the table configured for horizontal cuts. Try to run the blade teeth toward the wood to prevent tearout. You can also use a fine-toothed handsaw with a scrap of your ...


4

You need to get professionals to do this, imho, as the structure will need supporting while the floor-base is sorted out. That structure has significant weight and supporting it while providing sufficient access to the bits that need repairs / replacement is not a simple task.


4

If the floor framing is wide open, snap a chalkline on the side of the joist and run your circular saw on that. You could go so far as to screw a guide to the joist if you don't trust your skills, but it's a matter of finding a comfortable position and bracing against the joist with your hands. Just keep the saw table tight to the joist to keep the cut ...


4

Here is what I did - and 3 weeks later I have not had any issues or noise so I figured I would share in case someone ends up having the same issue. I opened up the floor even further so I could inspect the joists as Isherwood suggested to better determine why the joist is high. What I found was that the telepost that I thought was just part of a small wall ...


4

Insulated slabs usually have vapor barrier underneath. Since you did a test and found no moisture, there should be no problem installing vinyl flooring on it.


4

No, that's not the normal way to fasten hardwood floors. Usually they are nailed or stapled on the edges which are then covered by the adjoining piece. I suspect there was a problem here and the flooring was raised up and rather than take it out and do it right, they just stapled it down and left it. Poor workmanship in my opinion.


4

Looks like an epoxy floor coating. Quikrete, Drylock, and Rust-Oleum have products, probably many other specialist coating and concrete manufacturers do as well (I have a can of Quikrete's version kicking around somewhere that I got from a friend who overbought it, but I haven't gotten around to putting it down yet. Can't really help beyond identification).


4

Are you able to put down bricks or cobblestones? Or Pre-cast concrete pavers? Ideally you want a hard surface that won't be muddy in the rain, and will allow rainwater to drain off. It should therefore stand slightly higher than the nearest drain. Bicycles aren't heavy, but you still want a flat base layer of compacted sand to support the pavers/bricks, ...


3

This is a floating floor, when you rip the pieces and install them they will be partly covered by the mouldings. This is the normal way to install this type of flooring.


3

I do not use a laminate cutter. For some laminates I am able to score with a razor knife and a straight edge and then snap, for others I use a miter saw for cross cuts, a table saw for ripping lengthwise and a jigsaw to cut around closet openings and door openings.


3

Just align everything and tap it back into place with a block of wood laid over the top. Work slowly and watch for misalignment, working from the end that's still in place. It should go back in without much trouble unless it buckled because of severe swelling due to moisture. In that case, wait until it dries out and try then. I'd use galvanized, coated, ...


3

Underlayment doesn't settle or compress appreciably, and you usually won't find varying thicknesses of your particular choice of flooring. You'd have to change brands to change thickness. Unless you have some specific height need, purchase what suits your fancy. The transition between the new and old floors should accommodate, and a difference in height of ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible