19

There are arguments for not having the flooring under the cabinets at all (if it's "floating" flooring, the cabinets on top "pin" that part of the flooring to the floor so it does not "float.") In that case you'd stop 1/4-1/8" from the toe-kick at the front of the cabinet. Other than that, it's a highway for rodents and ...


19

That is just fine. The only possible downside is that if you decide to re-arrange the kitchen in the future and the area will become "uncovered", you will have to deal with it at that point. Maybe make sure you keep enough of the flooring around to fill in the remainder if needed.


17

I would switch it out for a flush cleanout plug and paint it to match as close as possible. You should not cover or hide it because it is probably for sewer clean-out purposes.


17

For completeness, I'm going to mention that there are products that allow you to screw down floorboards without removing the carpet such as the Squeek no more kit. This isn't the only such product, but the basic idea is that the screw makes a tiny hole in the carpet and once its tight, the head breaks off, leaving no trace. I think I've seen a version that ...


13

I would recommend that any new walls, including those for built-in closets/wardrobes be done before the final finish flooring goes down. You would want to build on the subfloor, nailing the sole plate of the wall down to the subfloor (preferably into joists below, if at all possible), and not having to worry about trying to cut through finish flooring in 10 ...


11

There are two main reasons: When you install planks there is a requirement that the ends of the plank must be within a certain distance of ends of other planks on adjacent rows. This means you probably cannot make your rows match perfectly even if the planking comes in a variety of sizes. So you will have some cut-off waste and for most planking, ...


10

Things may be different outside the UK, but I've never found the "top coat" flooring to go all the way to wall under cabinets. The cabinets generally have extendible legs so you can get the cabinet to the correct height and level, and so it's unlikely you'll need the additional height that the flooring provides. Putting (possibly expensive) ...


9

Most carpets are fixed with grippers at the edges. Unhook and roll the carpet back, then deal with the floor. Roll out the carpet and stretch it to re-hook it onto the grippers. Carpet fitters have tools for this - not something you can do just by hands alone.


8

I did a similar job with tiles, but stopped the tiles at the base of the cabinet. Rationale for this decision was that if a tile near the cabinet cracked or otherwise became damaged, it was easier to remove and replace than if the tile ran under the cabinet. I raised the cabinets up by the 1/4" or 3/8" thickness of the tiles (which ran under the ...


8

Since you're not asking how to level the floor, and since that would be a much more substantial project requiring much more information, I'll just address the molding detail. Base shoe exists in part because it bends on the vertical plane much more readily than taller base trim does. It can be made to fit floors that aren't flat without planing or other cuts....


7

We do not install hardwood in kitchen under cabinets on the plumbing/gas wall. Your last row should sit about 1/4" from cabinets - you may need to rip these planks. I am a little perplexed at some of the answers and advice here. This isn't a hard question. In Europe we do... No you don't. I have done many renos in France and spend a lot of time ...


7

Painted white is cheap. That's really all there is to it, no reason you can't do it differently, and you can find plenty of non-white baseboards in the states - but a preponderance of Florida housing is mass-built developments that are going to run towards cheap and standardized. Wood is common in older houses, but once some idiot decides to paint it, it ...


6

Having never installed a floating floor before, take this with a grain of salt... However, I think you'd be OK leaving it like that. The majority of the cabinet's weight will be sitting on the new flooring, so you're not likely to have any tipping or other issues with setting your cabinets. If it were me, though, I'd probably rip flooring to mostly fill the ...


6

First - you have done nothing that will harm your house other than give a few bugs a raceway, but this is the 50th raceway, not the 1st. Second - you will have to open it up from below to see what is there. You went through bottom plate and subfloor. You probably (almost definitely not) don't need a longer bit.


6

If you have a lot of casing to raise, rent an undercut saw. They're much faster than oscillating saws (though the time benefit depends on how far you have to drive to rent). If you're buying a new tool to own, an oscillating saw is probably more useful and will get the job done. Quality of cuts in either case depend on technique and skill. You can make a ...


5

The only reasonable chance would be to drill around every nailhead with a hollow drill, and hope the construction adhesive, if present, isn't doing a lot. The point to replacing it with new material is pretty much one of if the construction adhesive is doing much, you're going to have damage when you remove the sheet, so you'll want an undamaged sheet to ...


4

I would start by digging a trench and filling with gravel / small stones to direct the water away as much as possible. Did that at the back of my property - started at 6" deep and went to 12" as it needs a small slope. directed the water into an existing drain and it worked a treat. Only took 2 afternoons of digging and measuring the slope. Edit: ...


4

When asbestos was used in everything from cooking pan trays to attic insulation on ducts I don't remember hearing of it being mixed into concrete walls or floors. Even if it was used with the concrete the only way to release it and have it become air borne (where it is a hazard through inhalation) would be if the floor was chiseled or ground on. Mopping or ...


4

A few extra holes in the plates are not unsafe, so no -- you didn't harm your house. Guessing here, but your plate+subfloor+joist height+top plate of first floor is more than 12". Get an 18" installer bit (with a hole near the tip) and use it to fish the wire. Try to make sure you end up centered in the plate below. Edit to say that you need to cut ...


4

Replace your cleanout plug with the flush type that Jimmy Fix-it suggests. Use PTFE thread tape or thread compound for a good seal or just make sure it's tight. Fit your flooring around it, then lay a stainless cover over the top. Drill through the cap to fit its mounting screw. You could support the center of the cover with a suitable stack of washers so it ...


4

Whooaa! It may be hardwood but it most likely - 95%+ - engineered hardwood. First 7" is not common at all for pure hardwood and would cost a fortune. Second you almost never float pure hardwood. So let's assume it is a nice engineered floor. The wear layer on these range between 1/32nd to a 1/4" and hardly any of them can be sanded, even once....


4

If you can get a look at the floor joists below, you might want to investigate why that dips so badly right there. If there's old termite damage, you're probably OK. If there is current termite activity or other rot, you may will want to fix that first. You may be able to drive shims between the joist and flooring to push the floor up to meet the trim, then ...


4

I would use an oscillating multi-tool with a wood/hardwood blade. Most of them allow you to set the blade to various angles in relation to the body of the tool allowing you to find the most comfortable way to make the cut. It can be unwieldy to start the cut without a steady hand, but a guide right on your line can get it started. Holding the blade ...


3

I would go all the way to the wall so the back of the cabinet has something to sit on. Nice job BTW.


3

You could get something called a trim screw. They also sell them in white if you wish to match the color and not cover the hole with putty. It sounds like you don't feel comfortable with trim nails as you might damage the surface of the material with your hammer. Quite frankly, that will likely happen if you're a novice. A brad nailer is great for speed but ...


3

Do you still have any pieces of laminate and willing to some more work? You are supposed to undercut the door jamb with saw and slide the laminate under the jamb for a clean look


3

If you really feel you need to sister the joist all the way over to the beam, then I would 1) remove some more of the floor, 2) remove the existing single joist hangar and 3) replace it with a double joist hangar that will accommodate both the existing and the sister joist.


3

Use an angle grinder. I recommend practicing though I find angle grinders one of the easiest tools to control (no crazy binding like drills). Really you should buy one they are $15 USD at harbor freight. If you are going to use it more than once splurge and get the $30 one. Any metal cutting disc will cut that quick. Just get a thin kerf (3/32") ...


3

Tricks for dealing with being 2" short on flooring: Steal pieces that will be in a closet or under furniture along the wall, and move them to the visible part. Replace the moved piece with new flooring that looks close, and will be hidden in the closet or under a hutch or buffet cabinet etc.. If you don't have a hutch, buy one, new or used. If in a ...


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