We’re rewarding the question askers & reputations are being recalculated! Read more.
30

Wood flooring is usually installed with a gap to the actual wall - this is important, because it allows for differences in expansion/contraction between the flooring and the materials used to frame the building. If you tried to make a perfect tight fit, the floor would either buckle, crack, or pull away from the wall. The gap is typically covered with trim (...


9

What I would do is take up and replace that area. You should have some wood left over from install--check your attic or garage. Installers usually leave a box for repair because the color dye lot will never be the same over time. If you don't have any then remove some from a closet or under staircase or pantry. Replace that area with plywood or a flooring of ...


4

Are you able to put down bricks or cobblestones? Or Pre-cast concrete pavers? Ideally you want a hard surface that won't be muddy in the rain, and will allow rainwater to drain off. It should therefore stand slightly higher than the nearest drain. Bicycles aren't heavy, but you still want a flat base layer of compacted sand to support the pavers/bricks, ...


2

You should be able to buy some rectangular strips of cork from the shops that sell laminate flooring. Cut some squares and put it in the holes. This also allows the floor to expand. I had to do this when I put some flooring up to a banister and had no neat way of putting edging over the space. Cork expansion strips:


2

I got some wood putty. Then I took a piece of the laminate to Lowes and had them color match with a sample size paint. I sanded the wood putty and painted. You can't even tell unless you are right up to it. I am struggling to add a picture


1

To me it sounds like you over etched the slab. I have done many garages and basement floors and never had “rice” sized grain except where I was using really strong acid to pull out oil. Usually I use a 2 part epoxy no primer and it usually fills the voids with 1 coat, their have been a few jobs where the finish was not very good and on those I just used a ...


1

The 3 mil (0.003 inch) thickness in the product documentation is about the same as the thickness specified for an automotive epoxy primer I worked with this summer. For comparison, I sprayed that product onto steel that was prepped with either sandblasting with 80 grit media or D/A sanding with 320 grit screen. It came out fairly smooth -- certainly there's ...


1

A membrane won’t be adequate. If you want ‘waterproof,’ think shower pan. Not literally but by making this area semi-vitreous, there must be a drain or drains and a slope. If you’re trying to avoid the disaster of the previous owner, I wouldn’t recommend the travertine, unless you put in a drain. Have you considered Saltillo tile, limestone, or another ...


1

Very simple. If is a door frame? Get a dremel tool and cut the bottom of the frame carefully so you can place the flooring and around the walls remove the old baseboard or place a brand new one like it was mention before to cover the small gap left by the flooring.


1

There's a lot of problems with this particle board subfloor snap-in wood flooring bathroom flooring Your bathroom is a wet zone. Wood floor/subfloor and water don't go together. Add in Due to water damage I needed to repair a section of my particle board bathroom subfloor and you have a recipe for disaster. The water will penetrate a wood floor and ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible