32

It's not the end of the world, but you might consider cutting the pieces so the gap is smaller. Why? Some cabinets sit on the floor via little legs. If the legs were to be exactly where there's no flooring, it becomes uneven. You'd then have to put something under it the right thickness, which just happens to be your flooring. If it were me, I'd spend the ...


18

That is just fine. The only possible downside is that if you decide to re-arrange the kitchen in the future and the area will become "uncovered", you will have to deal with it at that point. Maybe make sure you keep enough of the flooring around to fill in the remainder if needed.


17

There are arguments for not having the flooring under the cabinets at all (if it's "floating" flooring, the cabinets on top "pin" that part of the flooring to the floor so it does not "float.") In that case you'd stop 1/4-1/8" from the toe-kick at the front of the cabinet. Other than that, it's a highway for rodents and ...


13

I would recommend that any new walls, including those for built-in closets/wardrobes be done before the final finish flooring goes down. You would want to build on the subfloor, nailing the sole plate of the wall down to the subfloor (preferably into joists below, if at all possible), and not having to worry about trying to cut through finish flooring in 10 ...


9

Things may be different outside the UK, but I've never found the "top coat" flooring to go all the way to wall under cabinets. The cabinets generally have extendible legs so you can get the cabinet to the correct height and level, and so it's unlikely you'll need the additional height that the flooring provides. Putting (possibly expensive) ...


7

We do not install hardwood in kitchen under cabinets on the plumbing/gas wall. Your last row should sit about 1/4" from cabinets - you may need to rip these planks. I am a little perplexed at some of the answers and advice here. This isn't a hard question. In Europe we do... No you don't. I have done many renos in France and spend a lot of time ...


7

I did a similar job with tiles, but stopped the tiles at the base of the cabinet. Rationale for this decision was that if a tile near the cabinet cracked or otherwise became damaged, it was easier to remove and replace than if the tile ran under the cabinet. I raised the cabinets up by the 1/4" or 3/8" thickness of the tiles (which ran under the ...


6

Having never installed a floating floor before, take this with a grain of salt... However, I think you'd be OK leaving it like that. The majority of the cabinet's weight will be sitting on the new flooring, so you're not likely to have any tipping or other issues with setting your cabinets. If it were me, though, I'd probably rip flooring to mostly fill the ...


3

I would go all the way to the wall so the back of the cabinet has something to sit on. Nice job BTW.


2

One method, like in this YouTube video, would be to use heat bond carpet seaming tape. Pro carpet installers use it with a special iron to seam carpet together, but you can use a clothes iron since you will be working on the back side. This would give a strong bond but you will still need a rug pad to keep it from sliding around. (The heat seal tape has a ...


2

That pipe is already left open and surely not active or charged. Cutting it again will not be a problem, since it is no more than cutting it again slightly lower than what it is already. If you want to go the safest route, since the floor is being redone anyway, remove enough of the existing floor to cut it below the existing floor to place a self sealing ...


1

There are many options for the transition from hard flooring to carpet, and the method of securing the carpet depends on the option you choose. You could have the cut carpet edge end in a metal strip of the color you prefer. In this case, there are strips that act as a tack strip, wherein the carpet is gripped by the strip itself and tucked under a ...


1

I don't know that there is any one answer for how is it usually covered. It really depends on budget, taste and how perfect you want it. I think there are a number of options. Leave as is Use a plinth block for the casing sides, ignore the door jamb portion. The casing side is typically the most visible. #2 but also cut a piece of wood for the jamb ...


1

The short answer is that it isn't usually "fixed" by inserting something in that gap. Ideally there would have been an underlayment installed to bring the new flooring up to the level of the old, but I can see why that effort and expense would be foregone. Just about anything you'd put in there will make the situation more conspicuous and possibly ...


1

Luan plywood tends to have a ton of resin and other chemicals in it (due mostly to the species of wood used). This can leach out and stain tile grout or vinyl flooring (or cause adhesive issues due to salts, etc.). It's a very soft plywood, so it may not have enough rigidity to support the floor and prevent dents. It tends to have voids in the interior ...


1

I dusted the subfloor with corn starch and swept it around...instant non-sticky surface that stayed absolutely non-sticky to lay my vinyl plank flooring. There can't be any easier solution than this.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible