30

Wood flooring is usually installed with a gap to the actual wall - this is important, because it allows for differences in expansion/contraction between the flooring and the materials used to frame the building. If you tried to make a perfect tight fit, the floor would either buckle, crack, or pull away from the wall. The gap is typically covered with trim (...


28

There are a lot of factors when it comes to pricing flooring as it has become a highly competitive, mass produced commodity. What you have here is the cheapest specs you can get in wood flooring: 2" wide planks are about as narrow as it gets, it is a harder install 3/8" thickness is about as thin as it gets and will limit its application to something ...


20

That's the worst job I've ever seen at installing quarter round. As others have said, your installer was incredibly lazy. There are several different techniques that could be used for terminating the corner rounds in both the corners and at the ends. A simple 45° miter is the simplest for both inside and outside corners. If you want to get fancy, you can ...


19

That is just fine. The only possible downside is that if you decide to re-arrange the kitchen in the future and the area will become "uncovered", you will have to deal with it at that point. Maybe make sure you keep enough of the flooring around to fill in the remainder if needed.


19

There are arguments for not having the flooring under the cabinets at all (if it's "floating" flooring, the cabinets on top "pin" that part of the flooring to the floor so it does not "float.") In that case you'd stop 1/4-1/8" from the toe-kick at the front of the cabinet. Other than that, it's a highway for rodents and ...


17

There are several factors to consider. Buckling would be the least concern if the hardwood floors are installed properly. I would lay the floors first and then install the cabinets. I have been involved in the construction of hundreds of new homes and we have always laid the hardwood floors first. Appliances - The height of the cabinets needs to be 36 ...


17

I would switch it out for a flush cleanout plug and paint it to match as close as possible. You should not cover or hide it because it is probably for sewer clean-out purposes.


17

For completeness, I'm going to mention that there are products that allow you to screw down floorboards without removing the carpet such as the Squeek no more kit. This isn't the only such product, but the basic idea is that the screw makes a tiny hole in the carpet and once its tight, the head breaks off, leaving no trace. I think I've seen a version that ...


16

Tile first, then carpet. Tiling is a messy process. Much easier not to have the carpet there to get messy and/or need to be kept clean while you are tiling.


15

Exceptionally unprofessional work. The quarter rounds should be mitered together at a minimum. They're not even touching at all in your second and third pictures. It's just cosmetic, though. Not gonna hurt anything except your aesthetic preferences.


15

It is thick side up, but to use that for flooring it was not milled properly. Yes the top is to be the thicker side but the thin side is too thin to hold up over time and not crack here or there. There should be a relief cut on the bottom face to help prevent cupping and where the nail goes through to keep the splinters raising the board off the subfloor. ...


15

This is called VCT, Vinyl Composition tile. It's normally installed with adhesive and maintained with various cleaners and polishes. It's very common in commercial installations.


15

Software would be nice, but setting up your room diagram is probably more work than just trying your layout in reality. Plus, there's no substitute for actually seeing it in place. I usually do this: Lay a row of tiles down the center of the long axis of the room. Don't forget to space them as you intend to do with the final floor. At key locations, run ...


14

In two old homes now I've shredded the wood floor under my chair, monster splinters eventually emerging. I work at home in semi-rural New Hampshire. I think they're very old pine floors, so softwood. I plan to try Shepherd Brand Urethane Casters after putty and repainting. From the manufacturer's site, "Nylon tread for carpeting, and urethane tread ...


14

It certainly is acceptable to do a tile job in phases. There's no structural reason that tiles need to have their supporting mortar connected mechanically. The critical bond is to the substrate, not adjacent tiles or mortar. Large residential and commercial tile jobs are done in stages every day, and with no special procedures or materials. One caveat ...


14

The flooring is supposed to extend far enough under the door trim molding so that no sub-floor is visible. The gap you have is non-standard and is completely unacceptable. Presumably you have some scraps of flooring left. The installer should scrape out the filler and insert a piece of flooring into the gap. EDIT To be able to work in the scrap of ...


14

While re-doing the floor to go under the trim would be desirable, a hack might make things worse. My best suggestion is a square edge plinth block to cover the mess. Maybe you'll have to do that with a few adjacent doors to match up, but it's an extremely easy fix.


13

It's normal for floorboards to have cuts in them as getting boards long enough for the entire span is impractical or would be more costly. Shorter boards are commonly used so you will have joints. However, the joints are normally level and both sides of the board should be supported. A joint should only be made on top of a joist so that both sides are ...


13

I would recommend that any new walls, including those for built-in closets/wardrobes be done before the final finish flooring goes down. You would want to build on the subfloor, nailing the sole plate of the wall down to the subfloor (preferably into joists below, if at all possible), and not having to worry about trying to cut through finish flooring in 10 ...


12

Solid wood flooring in a wet area is inherently risky due to the moisture everywhere. Pine flooring (a moisture-absorbent softwood) is inherently risky to install. Solid boards are inherently more prone to cupping than engineered boards. Gluing a wood floor to concrete is inherently risky because concrete is a big sponge that absorbs and releases moisture in ...


12

First of all, you cannot assume that any flooring you install is going to be "waterproof". That is an impossible standard in home construction, so the solution is to PREVENT water from getting to the floor surface and also to ACCOMMODATE any that does get there. That being said, you should choose a flooring material that doesn't degrade when wet. Tile is ...


11

The way we lay flooring is to use subfloor adhesive and lay a bead down the whole length of the groove. You wedge it together till the gap totally closes. Doing this in addition to using tongue and groove plywood/OSB accomplishes two things: You have an airtight floor membrane. This gets rid of heat loss and also the intrusion of moist damp air possibly ...


11

There are two main reasons: When you install planks there is a requirement that the ends of the plank must be within a certain distance of ends of other planks on adjacent rows. This means you probably cannot make your rows match perfectly even if the planking comes in a variety of sizes. So you will have some cut-off waste and for most planking, ...


10

Your problem is obvious. Moisture is migrating up from the slab. I don't imagine anyone suggested to do a moisture check on the concrete before you started? There are meters that can measure the % of moisture in concrete. With that said, it is never a good idea to put wood or laminate directly on concrete slabs or uncured concrete upper floors. In your ...


10

Baseboards should be installed after laminate. Most (all?) Laminate is a floating flooring system which means it doesn't actually attach to the subfloor (friction holds it in place once all the pieces are set together. As a result, it will expand/contract a bit with temperature/humidity changes in the house. Because of this, you have to leave a small (...


10

Things may be different outside the UK, but I've never found the "top coat" flooring to go all the way to wall under cabinets. The cabinets generally have extendible legs so you can get the cabinet to the correct height and level, and so it's unlikely you'll need the additional height that the flooring provides. Putting (possibly expensive) ...


9

Looking at different images may help you determine the species. Keep in mind I'm not a wood expert, and wood being a natural material will vary widely. Oak Oak tends to have a bold tight grain Ash Ash tends to have a bold semi-tight grain. Hickory Hickory tends to have a more subtle longer grain. Maple Maple tends to have a subtle semi-tight grain. ...


9

Assuming that this is a locking tongue-and-groove product... Rip the strip and install it as normal. There's no reason at all not to, and it happens on almost every flooring install in one place or another. Your shoe will help secure it and it won't look like some sort of hack.


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