30

Wood flooring is usually installed with a gap to the actual wall - this is important, because it allows for differences in expansion/contraction between the flooring and the materials used to frame the building. If you tried to make a perfect tight fit, the floor would either buckle, crack, or pull away from the wall. The gap is typically covered with trim (...


28

There are a lot of factors when it comes to pricing flooring as it has become a highly competitive, mass produced commodity. What you have here is the cheapest specs you can get in wood flooring: 2" wide planks are about as narrow as it gets, it is a harder install 3/8" thickness is about as thin as it gets and will limit its application to something ...


20

That's the worst job I've ever seen at installing quarter round. As others have said, your installer was incredibly lazy. There are several different techniques that could be used for terminating the corner rounds in both the corners and at the ends. A simple 45° miter is the simplest for both inside and outside corners. If you want to get fancy, you can ...


17

There are several factors to consider. Buckling would be the least concern if the hardwood floors are installed properly. I would lay the floors first and then install the cabinets. I have been involved in the construction of hundreds of new homes and we have always laid the hardwood floors first. Appliances - The height of the cabinets needs to be 36 ...


16

Tile first, then carpet. Tiling is a messy process. Much easier not to have the carpet there to get messy and/or need to be kept clean while you are tiling.


15

It depends on a couple of things. How much time you want to invest, how your current baseboards are installed, size of current baseboards, and what you want everything to look like. As long as it isn't a HUGE deal to take baseboards out I would almost always go with removing them. Your finish will look better. No quarter round looks way more professional....


15

Exceptionally unprofessional work. The quarter rounds should be mitered together at a minimum. They're not even touching at all in your second and third pictures. It's just cosmetic, though. Not gonna hurt anything except your aesthetic preferences.


15

It is thick side up, but to use that for flooring it was not milled properly. Yes the top is to be the thicker side but the thin side is too thin to hold up over time and not crack here or there. There should be a relief cut on the bottom face to help prevent cupping and where the nail goes through to keep the splinters raising the board off the subfloor. ...


15

This is called VCT, Vinyl Composition tile. It's normally installed with adhesive and maintained with various cleaners and polishes. It's very common in commercial installations.


15

Software would be nice, but setting up your room diagram is probably more work than just trying your layout in reality. Plus, there's no substitute for actually seeing it in place. I usually do this: Lay a row of tiles down the center of the long axis of the room. Don't forget to space them as you intend to do with the final floor. At key locations, run ...


14

The flooring is supposed to extend far enough under the door trim molding so that no sub-floor is visible. The gap you have is non-standard and is completely unacceptable. Presumably you have some scraps of flooring left. The installer should scrape out the filler and insert a piece of flooring into the gap. EDIT To be able to work in the scrap of ...


14

While re-doing the floor to go under the trim would be desirable, a hack might make things worse. My best suggestion is a square edge plinth block to cover the mess. Maybe you'll have to do that with a few adjacent doors to match up, but it's an extremely easy fix.


13

It certainly is acceptable to do a tile job in phases. There's no structural reason that tiles need to have their supporting mortar connected mechanically. The critical bond is to the substrate, not adjacent tiles or mortar. Large residential and commercial tile jobs are done in stages every day, and with no special procedures or materials. One caveat ...


12

Anything rigid you put over a flimsy structure will be destroyed over time because it won't have the support it needs. Most tiles (except plastic/vinyl) don't handle bending well. Self leveling compound doesn't add rigidity, it just makes a smooth top surface. You need to fix the structure first. That means going down before you go up.


12

While this will not directly answer your question, I'd like to offer an alternative solution. Modify Existing Molding If it were me. I'd get some transition molding, with a profile like this. I'd then set up my table saw to rip the piece, to remove the angle profile on the back edge. Which would give me a profile like this. Once I had my molding ripped ...


12

Solid wood flooring in a wet area is inherently risky due to the moisture everywhere. Pine flooring (a moisture-absorbent softwood) is inherently risky to install. Solid boards are inherently more prone to cupping than engineered boards. Gluing a wood floor to concrete is inherently risky because concrete is a big sponge that absorbs and releases moisture in ...


11

If you really want to try to save the plank, BMitch's instructions for removal are spot on but instead of a circular saw, get yourself one of these babies: The square blade shown here will give you clean end cuts, and for your long run, this blade will be your friend: You'll get very straight, TIGHT cut lines along the seams, be practically invisible when ...


11

I don't see any nail-heads or screw-heads in the carpet edge trim, so you probably have one like this: You might be able to save it, but they're cheap so I'd just replace it with a new one. Pry it up taking care not to damage the door trim. The carpet in the door opening should be loose enough that you can get access to the linoleum underneath (there may ...


11

If you have acess to Dremel or other rotary tool you can use a cutoff /abrasive wheel attachment to cut them off. They may have been inserted by a power tool that fires them in with a gunpowder charge. If this is the case prying them out will be difficult if not impossible. You could try a Sawzall but these type of fasteners are very hard and you will go ...


11

First of all, I disagree with your orientation. But, it is your choice, and I'll respect that. You may want to read this: http://diy.blogoverflow.com/2012/09/installing-laminateengineered-wood-floating-floors/ Pay close attention to the pre-measuring, so that you avoid having a 1 inch board running along either wall. The idea is that you never want to ...


11

In two old homes now I've shredded the wood floor under my chair, monster splinters eventually emerging. I work at home in semi-rural New Hampshire. I think they're very old pine floors, so softwood. I plan to try Shepherd Brand Urethane Casters after putty and repainting. From the manufacturer's site, "Nylon tread for carpeting, and urethane tread for ...


10

Well it depends on the output of the radiant floor, but in general yes they are sufficient to heat a room. We have underfloor heating (hot water with heat spreader plates under floorboards) in our upstairs rooms and they warm the rooms quite well. The floors are warm to touch (as would be expected). The temperature of the room is more uniform the heat is ...


10

If there's a door, under the door, directly. Otherwise, either dead center or even with one edge or the other. If there's no door, I'd say bring the carpet up to the edge of the tile, rather than cutting the tile to meet in the middle. That said - it's a purely aesthetic choice.


10

In your situation, using real 3/4" hardwood flooring should be a lifetime floor. I cannot see any reason to remove it as any other type of flooring in the future could be installed right over it. Since it is much more likely to have some type of cabinet upgrade rather than actually needing to remove the hardwood, I would install the hardwood wall to wall ...


10

There is a whole new generation of fiberglass, not vinyl, flooring that is self laying. The various manufacturers say wit will lay flat, not curl or bubble without adhesive. I have my doubts, but admit I have not used it without adhesive. The manufacturer does says that when adhesive is used, it can only be "Releasable Pressure Sensitive Adhesive", never ...


10

They are referred to as "Nail on Glides" at my local hardware store. They can be found near the other hardware like the hinges, locks, and door stops.


10

Surface finishes are notoriously difficult to get smooth when the process is interrupted. The glossier the finish, the harder to have sections blend. If you are talking about preliminary coats, especially if they will get a light sanding between coats, this is probably ok. For the finish coat, I would strive hard to do it all in one shot. If you simply ...


10

Your problem is obvious. Moisture is migrating up from the slab. I don't imagine anyone suggested to do a moisture check on the concrete before you started? There are meters that can measure the % of moisture in concrete. With that said, it is never a good idea to put wood or laminate directly on concrete slabs or uncured concrete upper floors. In your ...


10

Baseboards should be installed after laminate. Most (all?) Laminate is a floating flooring system which means it doesn't actually attach to the subfloor (friction holds it in place once all the pieces are set together. As a result, it will expand/contract a bit with temperature/humidity changes in the house. Because of this, you have to leave a small (...


9

Pull out the carpets. never put a subfloor over something like old carpet. You may not have any moisture problems now, but any occurrence of water (flood, broken plumbing, spill) getting in that hidden carpet in the future will cause you more grief than you could dream of. This would be a perfect situation to grow mold, mildew, stink and rot the wood ...


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