4

Floor heating systems are very slow and normally meant to run 24/7 except for long-term absence (> 3 days), if the building hull is insulated to some extent or if it is a huge building with high volume-to-surface ratio. Do the neighbours have the same problem? Which floor is it? How many outside walls does this flat have? What is below the floor, what is ...


4

Since this seems to be an ongoing problem for you, I might suggest a somewhat more formal approach to it. For instance, use magnets to attach toweling to the top of the radiator shell and let the duble-thickness of that towelling (magnet inside the fold) drape all the way to the floor - that should basically shut-down air flow through the radiator from top ...


3

I have in floor heating (pex tubing in lightweight concrete) and it's inherently slow. You can't do normal "setback at night" sort of programming and expect 6-8 degrees of recovery quickly in the morning like you could with a forced air furnace. My system also has an outdoor temp sensor that varies the temp of the water supplied to the floors. If ...


2

In Russia, they just left the windows open. A photo would help. In general your towels or foil are safe to use, the towels will probably work best. You want to block airflow as much as possible, then, once that's good have an insulating layer. Or just a good talk with building maintenance about installing a flow restriction device on your line. A down ...


2

Your hydronic floor heating system could have several problems. You'll want to troubleshoot to narrow it down: If you hold the pipe that returns from the upstairs room, is it warm like the other pipe? If so, then there is circulation happening. In that case, you can try to balance the system by directing more flow into that pipe. This is done by turning ...


2

It is very normal to install underfloor heating under wooden flooring, in fact in Scandinavia the majority of houses with underfloor heating have wooden floors. Wood does insulate to a certain extent but it is no reason not to install underfloor heating. There can however be other factors such as your current floor construction that may introduce extra ...


1

This isn't an "answer" but a caution. I have a hydronic, in floor heating system in my house and let me tell you, there is a LOT of design and engineering to do to get this right. Even the tubing layout in the floor has design criteria (pattern should be that half way thru the loop, the tubing should parallel the first part for more even heat ...


1

As per a couple of suggestions, I did contact the manufacturer and got a prompt reply indicating that it would not be covered by warranty if installed that way. Thanks for the suggestion.


1

You’re looking for something with “thermal mass”. I’d use tile, concrete or rock material. All can absorb heat and then release the stored heat later. Here’s a website that explains it: https://greenpassivesolar.com/passive-solar/building-characteristics/thermal-mass/


1

Hydronic heating is much cheaper to run but more costly to install. 40 square meters is a pretty large space for electric. If it's going to be your only heat source and you live in a cool climate go hydronic.


1

You cannot always interchange the thermostats in this application. As long as your thermostat is a transformer coupled switch (essentially closes the contacts between two wires to call for heat) you can. If it uses live AC voltage, or serial communications, you have to replace it with another suitable replacement. You will have to identify the make/model of ...


1

As the "Spirovent" label should lead you to believe, yes, it's an automatic vent (albeit one that looks rather gunked up at the vent.) This would appear to be the instructions for your device:http://www.spirotherm.com/sites/default/files/JR%20IOM-B.pdf You should also look for manual vents along the loop at high points. This helps keep pockets from forming ...


1

Is your house a multi story house and if so how many floors are there? How did they run the heating tubing for the upper floors? You said that 3 rooms upstairs do not get warm. Do any of the rooms upstairs get warm? Are the upstairs rooms larger than the rest of the rooms? If you can check, does all the water in the piping, both the supplies and returns, in ...


1

Doing random searches, I searched for 750 E1 E6 and found this datasheet. http://www.winterspm.com/wp-content/uploads/Operating-Instructions-for-Cuirt-Seoige-Underfloor-Heating.pdf


1

All of the air that blows out of your vents to heat or cool a room has to go somewhere. That somewhere is the large air return vent. When you close the door to a room, and there's not much of a gap under the door, the air blowing from the vents doesn't have any where to go (you just sealed the air's access to the return vent which is probably in a hallway ...


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