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The other answer is the craziest answer I can think of. Why give an answer that says: “gee…you should check what the code requires” ? First, 2x8’ at 16” on center with a span of 14’ can support a “Total Load” of 68 psf. Second, the “Dead Load” is probably about 2.5 psf for gypsum board ceiling, plus 2 psf for the 2x8 joists at 16” on center, plus 3 psf for ...


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The approach is fine for the purpose of existing joist capacity evaluation, however, note that in the deflection table, the limiting span length is derived by imposing a live load of 30 psf (see criteria), which is less than the 40 psf usually specified by the building code. To be correct, you have to confirm which live load value was in effect at the time ...


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The reaction was not a chemical one, but it seems physical pressure is the only one that damages (they were actually depressions on closer inspection, not raised ridges). I tested without foil and the heavy paint bucket did the ridges in the same way as with foil if left on the floor overnight.


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“Is there any chance there is some chemical reaction” the answer is absolutely yes there is a chance it may be 1 of 3 I know of ( Fat , slim & none) but there is a chance. It depends on the type of epoxy flooring paint, I have found multiple customers that were unhappy with 1 part epoxy coatings ! Some that after expensive removal were pleased with 2 ...


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The curbing should not be removed. It is typically an integral part of the wall foundation structure and may even have rebar embedded in the part that you think that you want to remove. The curbing is almost always installed as part of the foundation wall before the floor is ever poured. The width of the curbing is typically equal to the "thickness"...


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Go through the centre of the joist with the hole. This means any future nails from either side are less likely to puncture the pipe. Also the stress on the joist is zero at the centreline. But a maximum at each edge. And I have seen people run pipes and wires like you suggest - fine for them but later owners trying to reduce squeaks or moving boards then ...


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Pressure-treated lumber is as juicy as a ripe peach. On many occasions I've been splattered in the face while cutting and nailing boards fresh out of a strapped unit. It weights as much as three times a dry board. I'd guess that the concrete is drawing the moisture out of the wood. It's not coming through the nail holes. Run a fan to circulate things for a ...


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