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1

I know this is old, but I'll add this for others to reference: You can drop the door & frame fairly easily. If you are replacing the casing on both sides of the door, you can essentially "remove & reinstall" the door and frame (youtube is your friend). Then the gap at the bottom of the door will be correct as well.


1

The only way to get those joists not to flex is to turn your entire floor into a torsion box. These are common with wood workers as a flat and true workbenches. To bend the bottom of the joist has to be able to deflect. If you used construction adhesive and screwed sheets of plywood to the bottoms of the joists, forming a shell, the joists bottoms would ...


1

Your problem is not in the floor joists. They are sized to support about 74 lbs. per square foot (psf) depending on the species and grade of the wood. The Code only requires about 50 psf. I’d leave the joists alone unless there are notches in the lumber. I doubt the problem is with the subfloor. Almost all plywood is rated for 16” span for a floor, unless ...


-2

I am not an expert, but here are my ideas. The floor moves up-down (I guess) as opposed to left-right or forward-backward. It means that: there is space between the floor and the supporting beams; the (horizontal) supporting beams are too elastic. So some solutions would be: re-make all the joints using metal clamps ("L" shaped, or something ...


0

It’s an auxiliary drain line that would connect back into your primary floor drain system from the looks of it. Also acts as a breather preventing air lock from occuring. I wouldn't recommend removing it or sealing it.


9

imho I would be adding joist hangers to those joists. The nails may had luckily done the job so far - perhaps due to not many people being in the room at once or it's lightly used. Something like this, but you need to check what is available and accepted in your locality: Then you should investigate why the acrow prop is there - I don't think it is just for ...


0

Humidity is confusing. Too much can cause moisture on inside of windows, mold , etc. , too little can reduce moisture in wood and cause it to dry out and twist boards. Here is an article that explains it: https://www.coolray.com/help-guides/indoor_comfort_issues_to_much_or_too_little_humidity You indicate you live in a high humidity area when you say, will ...


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