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10

While this borders on being a "shopping recommendation" question, I think a "dry box" or "dry bag" is what you're looking for. These are often used by backpackers, rafters, kayakers, etc. to keep their items dry when out in the wilderness. Obviously, you'll need something larger than those folks will use because they usually don'...


7

General practice is going 6 inches above molded area and cut it out. You must inspect the backside of the drywall. If you can't you need to keep cutting out until you hit 6 inches of unaffected wall. You then need to follow a mold remediation plan - not sure how anything else in the wall looks but useless replacing the drywall if you will put up new ...


7

City employee, talked the boss into buying us a shop vac about 5 years ago ,so i saw the one with a built in "water pump",at Lowes and gave it try. Why not? Not my money if it turns out to be junk, lol. I used it to clean out one of our sump pump pits at the bottom of one of our dry wells at a sewer pump station . everything is around 40 feet straight down ...


6

The trap on a toilet (or any plumbing fixture) prevents sewer gas from escaping. It's a very low-pressure thing, consisting solely of a small amount of standing water filling a low spot in the drain. Any force capable of moving a little water can overcome it, including air vacuum if it's not properly vented. In the case of this flooding phenomenon, there ...


6

Oof! Shut this thing off, have the meter pulled, and keep this thing shut off until you can get it rectified! Flooded light-duty electrical equipment is universally beyond simple remediation due to the potential for water, salt deposits, and debris to have gotten into inaccessible areas and absorbed into insulating materials, causing arc tracking ...


6

Pickets should not be in contact with the ground because they will hold back water like this and they will rot out very quickly. This should definitely be on the installer to fix. Additionally, the pickets should not be installed so tightly against each other that they're sealing water in. The pickets will expand and contract with humidity and need room to ...


5

Glue-down garage door seal (sometimes called threshold seal) sounds like what you want. A rubber bump.


5

Water infiltration can come from 1) subsurface water, and 2) surface water. Subsurface water can come from a rising water table or from hydrostatic water rising up through the soil. Rising Water Table: You indicate the building is located above the water table. That may be true under normal conditions. When an extreme rain event occurs, the water table ...


5

It's likely that the flexible output hose is interfering with the pump float. When you close the lid the hose flexes into an S shape, laying on top of the float. The best solution is to eliminate the flexible hose in that area and replace it with rigid pipe, but you can also secure the hose in such a way that it can't settle like that. Make sure the lid is ...


4

Water damage isn't easy to deal with, here are the steps off the top of my head: Shutoff the water Get the water out, via floor drains, buckets, submersible pump, or a shop vac. I'd recommend the shop vac for being a fairly handy tool everyone should own. Dry the area, and remove anything damaged by the water. Use fans, open windows, and/or dehumidifiers to ...


4

DA's comment is correct. If water has gotten to your house all you can hope to do is minimize the damage...water WILL get in if it is up against the door. The best bet (a picture of the area in question would be useful) would be to build up the ground around the house to add a barrier to keep water off the house in the first place. That may or may not be ...


4

Assuming you can't get the political problem solved (letters to the editor time, perhaps), you need to address the part where "driveway sits low so all the rain comes in like a river" (though you might also take the practical citizen approach and see if there's anything blocking the ditches and drains that you can, as concerned citizen, remove on your own.) ...


4

Replacing the ductwork shouldn't be extremely expensive. Even if it was moderately expensive, I'd still do it. Mold/sewage/ etc is nasty.


3

Instead of patch repair solutions for the ductwork in the foundation, have you considered looking into quotes to add new ductwork along the ceiling of your walkout basement by branching off the ductwork under the house on top of the hill. You could then add ceiling vents that should never have water issues. In the short term, this could be a costlier option,...


3

Contact three or four local drainage contractors and ask if they will come out and give you a quote to solve the problem. You'll learn what methods they would employ, their guarantee, and cost. Then you can make an informed decision.


3

Clear PVC does exist and you might be able to locate some from Commercial Industial Supply (for example). With regard to gluing wire (insulation) to PVC, a copious amount of epoxy or silicone should work. Luckily, the pressure should not be extreme. The most important instruction is to drill the hole just large enough to slide the wire though without ...


3

Take a look at the image below. Code requires you have at least 3 feet in front of the panel, 6.5 above, and 30 inches side to side. There is a trick with the 30 inches that it can be measured from either side of the panel, dead center, etc. so you get some wiggle room there. Based on what you've said about your laundry room, it sounds like code-wise it will ...


3

Most houses only have traps installed, which prevents sewer gasses from entering the building. Some municipalities do require backflow prevents, which prevent sewage from entering the building. They do have a couple of drawbacks, though. There are location and slope restrictions on where they'll work, which can make installation in existing construction ...


3

All your cables are shot too NM cable is not rated for wet locations. That is a wet location. All your NM cables have paper packing, and all have had wicking action drag water several feet up the cable. It may take a year to dry, in the meantime the hot and neutral wire insulation is not made for water contact. Time for this panel to move, anyway ...


3

You are trying to combine two systems: 1) collection of ground water, and 2) collection of roof drainage. This is a bad idea...don’t do it. 1) Perforated pipe is used to COLLECT ground water. The concept behind the use of perforated pipe is that water flows in the direction of least resistance. That is to say, ground water near the perf pipe will flow into ...


3

The only person who will know for sure what your home owners policy covers will be your insurance agent. Best we could do is guess. I honestly have no idea. As far as the expense of repair, it depends on how much of the labor you can do yourself. Excavators aren't exactly cheap to rent, but they aren't thousands of dollars either. Pipe itself is usually ...


3

The radon pipe should be tightly sealed through the basement floor. If that gap you identified goes though the floor, then it should be sealed up because the system is supposed to vent radon from the soil. That opening would prevent that from happening and if you had a lot of rain, you could get water rising up through that gap. Wait until the basement ...


3

Since in commentary you've stated that you're already committed to genuine flood-resistant construction, now it's just a matter of documenting that to the satisfaction of insurance companies and the county. My advice is to research the gold standards in flood-immune construction, and modulate your design so that it plainly conforms to that. I don't think ...


3

Yes, you're going to want to run either a direct-burial cable or a conduit in a trench from your home to the pond. You'll also want to pull a permit for this work even if you plan to do it yourself and be sure you understand the code requirements in your location so that you don't make an expensive mistake and have to pull it out and re-do the work.


3

The extension cable or almost any method would be fine if you made sure the circuit has GFCI protection. Now, GFCI isn't just a different style of receptacle. It is actually a zone of protection. Obviously, it protects things plugged into the plugs (including extension cords), but it also protects any downline wiring that is attached to the GFCI's "...


3

If that's your plumbing layout, presumably it would overflow at the basement laundry sink if it was going to overflow with the floor drains successfully valved. Whether it would will depend how much pressure there is - while your flood was only a couple of inches, it was spread out from two floor drains across however much basement area it flooded, so there ...


2

You removed the 1 way check valve, likely part of the pump, when you cut the line to the pump. Your sump being low, already had a syphon ready to go, it just needed one last push to get started. The pump of one of your neighbors started and everything in the pipes of all 4 pipes came flowing into your sump. Your son witnessed an excellent lesson in ...


2

Yes, this is definitely home improvement material. What's the terrain like around your house? Could you dig a trench sloping downhill from the low point in your basement to "daylight" (ie, somewhere, like a ditch the water could drain away to without a pump?) As for it getting worse, could something have clogged up to cause more water to come in - your ...


2

Problem #1: You have under-slab ducts. These are bad because they can flood, harbor mold, and increase the dampeness of the house, and let in creepy-crawlies. Problem #2: when it rains, water gets under your slab--and floods the ducts! This means you have very poor drainage and a high water table. The best solution to this problem would be to seal up your ...


2

I had a similar problem, I made a 1" high, 3" wide concrete bump using some angled wood strips to hold it until set. The two strips were joined using small cross-bracing pieces of wood screwed from above. The strips were something like a 6 or 7 foot length of 2x1" wood at about 45 degrees to the ground. I made the concrete bump in sections that length. I ...


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