12

Clearly this has been a problem for a while and also the standing water and patch job on the flat section of the roof is to blame. There is no real shortcut here, as you can see, so the solution is to remove the roofing, repair the water damage, and then have it re-roofed properly. There are ways to apply a flat roof so that it will not leak but slathering ...


8

Most 3-way lighted switches work by adding a light between their line and load terminals: This actually causes a small current to flow through the load (light) -- with incandescent or fluorescent bulbs, it's not enough to actually cause the light to go on. But with your LED blub, it's enough to at least start the bulb. Your potential solutions: Replace ...


5

The term to research is kick out flashing. It's used when a roof line butts up against a vertical surface near the edge. It sends the water away from the vertical edge into the gutter. Example:


5

Your problem is going to be finding where the leak is coming from. I have found leaks that came in more than 10’ from the entry point. The water can travel under the rolled roofing and drip down at a seam then run on the rafters especially double plates prior to finally coming down. Today I use a FLIR camera I can see the water when it is traveling between ...


4

Aluminum flashing can not be in contact with pressure treated wood(it will eat away over time) I use ice and water shield or a window wrap in between flashing and PT ledger board this will seal around screw and not leak. To be honest though the amount of water that will make its way under the clip and through the hole and back towards the house is soo ...


4

Its just trim molding, to hide the cut edge of the soffit where it abuts the wall. It should be re-attached for both appearance and critter protection. You can add some foam insulation, which will help seal the edge. A bead of exterior caulk, then the molding, then another bead if there are any gaps in the molding-to-wall or molding-to-soffit, Use 1" to ...


4

Depends on where the indoor unit is that he had to connect to, in comparison of where the other were in your neighbors house. The important thing is, the tech did slope the pipe down and out of the wall at a heck of a good angle. The only problem I really see is the type of sealant he used as a finish, unless the plan was to come back, carve off the excess ...


4

For a newer solution, many dimmable LED should work. The little current that is flowing will not light the dimmable LED bulb. Many thanks for the previous Q & A, I would not have thought to try the dimmable LED bulb without your explanation about incandescents.


4

They probably should be dabbed with roofing cement, but they tend to self-seal to some extent. It's unlikely that they'd leak significantly. Also concerning is the fact that raw steel nails were used. They'll rust and stain the roof over time. Cement will mostly remedy that as well. FYI, I don't consider those nails necessary anywhere short of a hurricane ...


4

Think about replacing the sill and the casing with some of the PVC or composition boards that are available in the home stores. Any wood you put down there will be rotten again in 5 years.


4

It probably is rubber and you can try to glue it back up, but I doubt it will stick. The important thing when gluing rubber is that it is clean. The rubber can be cleaned with gasoline, but consider the location, such a thing would be a terrible idea. That is flashing against a wall. Rubber never stays stuck in that situation because it shrinks with age (no ...


3

Duct Seal is a common product used in the industry to seal around wall penetrations. It stays soft and flexible, so it handles expansion/contraction well. It's fairly easy to remove, and reapply or rework.


3

Some LEDs with switching power supplies demand power in pulses, which can get coupled back onto the power line as small surges. If you have bulbs which are making that demand at different frequencies, and the current available is a bit marginal, this can sometimes make one or more take longer to charge than they should and cause flashing. I have a ...


3

Yes this looks correct. You're right about cutting away too much shingle, but it looks like you fixed it with sealant.


3

Cement is porous, not waterproof, it acts like a sponge and will hold water. It also allows water vapor to pass through so condensation does not build up in walls. Tarpaper also allows water vapor to pass as well but not water itself. Tyvek has the same properties too. The point I am making here is the tarpaper is your waterproofing layer and the stucco or ...


3

That flue pipe looks like "Transite" pipe which was used on some gas only appliances before about 1960. When I got into the heating business in the late 1960's nobody was still using it. There were better alternatives. If it is transite, it probably contains asbestos. I don't know of any caps available for use on this product. You could take a standard 6" ...


3

The purpose of the flashing it to direct any water that manages to get behind the trim back to the outside surface of the house instead of letting it continue to worm its way inside where it can start to rot the framing. The pieces of wood you've identified don't have direct paths to behind the siding, so they don't need to be flashed. Keep in mind that the ...


3

Typically, an aluminum or galvanized "z flashing" as you called it, would be installed under the siding, over the top of the ledger and down the upper lip a little. Decking is installed on top of this flashing. (Diagram not to scale) Done this way there is no need for any of the other products you mentioned unless you have moisture or insect ...


3

IMHO, that rubber-like membrane is supposed to be tucked up behind the bottom row of siding. Looks like it was added without pulling the siding out to tuck the membrane under. Some flashing may work. Cut a piece 1" - 2" wide and as long as you can manage. Then gently with a small pry bar pull the bottom of the siding out a bit. You don't need ...


2

Perfect world ... the flashing would be gav metal and create a template (opening) for the vents. Top and side exterior would overlap this flashing top down to DRAIN water (installed as bottom, side, top). I'll mention tar paper here, or peel-n-stick, to underlay and cover any missteps...USE IT. If...when...you replace the wood, and peel-n-stick the area (...


2

That's at the PEAK of a shed roof, true? If that's the case, what you have amounts to a ridge cap, but nobody I know of manufactures premade ridge caps for shed roofs (too many different possibilities, not enough market), so the builder used "drip edge" or flat flashing (bent around the peak) to function as a ridge cap. There really aren't very many good ...


2

Your flashing will need to be fastened in place with something. I made 3 sketches the illustrate hopefully on of the ways to reset your flashing back in place. The first of three labeled, "Not good" ids the least desirable way to set flashing to a wall but it is done everywhere. It is simply a piece of metal liad to the wall and held in place with masonry ...


2

Yes there should be flashing but that isn't the main issue. This is the architect's problem. The top of your molding is flat. Where do you think water will go on a flat surface? It will sit on it. It will then seep into the wood and to the wood underneath it, slowly water logging and rotting all of it. If someone showed me your new molding I would ...


2

Vented soffit below the window will allow air in, and will reduce the effectiveness of insulation. Other than that, it wouldn't cause a problem, but you're already concerned about the cold near the window. You should focus on how the water gets in, and prevent that from happening in the first place. It should be fairly easy for your contractor to tell what'...


2

There are all kinds of options, but the cleanest are probably purpose made flashings specifically for AC lines, like these ones: Note that it is very important to tie a flashing like this into the overall water-resistive barrier to the house, similar to a flanged window. The "vent" entrance method would only work on a raised foundation structure, the home ...


2

Yeah, that roof's pretty beat. I'd actually go heavily at that seam with Mortar Caulk (its gritty & gray), the whole length of the seam if you don't know where the leak is. But, spraying a hose at the seam & very slowly moving the spray up the seam should give you a good idea of the problem area. Still caulk the whole seam, but then do under the ...


2

The Z flashing is there to prevent water from creating water damage as you have noticed. The flashing is usually overlapped and that is sufficient unless in a windy area then a very small bead of calk between the overlapped flashing can be used but is not needed when properly installed. When I used to build homes on the west coast we would lap the flashing ...


2

I can tell you it is inappropriate and must have been installed by someone that doesn’t understand flashing and counter flashing principles. The Code is clear, “The exterior walls shall provide a weather resistant wall envelope, ...including flashing.” (See ICC R703.1) The flashing should have been “step flashing”, as specified by the Code: “Approved ...


2

As a temporary fix, spread a layer of Henry Roof Patch around the area where the Pipe Flashing will go. Then press the boot down into the cold patch. Install a screw into each corner and attach the boot to the roof. Make sure the screws are long enough to go into the decking material. Spread some cold patch over the entire boot, especially the edges and at ...


2

I don't think using a flashing will hurt anything; but I also don't think it is necessary if you properly install a weatherproof box. You should consider potential cut/scrape hazard scenario as people (e.g.you) will be plugging things in and out, placing body parts near sharp sheet metal flashing. Also, make sure it will not interfere with the weatherproof ...


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