21

The simple way to "achieve that shape" is, of course, to buy it precast, which is almost certainly what the picture is - depending on size, it's either a section of well-casing, drainage pipe, or a manhole extension. @BrownRedHawk is correct that it may (indeed, probably will) destructively deteriorate if used as direct fire containment - the interior ...


16

The item you have pictured appears to be a precast fire ring. Several companies manufacture them specifically for fire pits. Depending on pricing and availability, it might be a lot easier, and possibly even cheaper to purchase one instead of trying to create your own. Since these are specially made for the purpose of being a fire pit, the manufacturers ...


13

"Landscape Timber" or, sometimes, "used railroad tie" - but "landscape timber" is what you'll find at most typical lumber suppliers. They will typically last several years - if well pressure-treated, longer. It's hard to know if they are really well pressure-treated until they start failing and you look at a calendar to figure out how long it's been. ...


10

I have played with various fire pit options in my backyard for 15 years. I have tons and tons of trees and yard waste and try to burn most or turn it into compost. I have grabbed the saucers from trash piles and used those - can't put much on there and wind blows stuff off easy. I have had an enclosed mini-chimney pit I built from stones. This worked ...


9

The internal bowl/barrel of an old washing machine works well for an above-ground solution - the holes around the sides allow the embers to breathe well and help to radiate heat. You can add legs as this person has, or simply prop it up on a slab or some bricks. Just make sure that it IS metal - a lot of the newer/cheaper washing machines use plastic ...


7

Unless you limit usage to tiny kindling fires, this is a bad plan. Sparks are common when burning wood, and a slight breeze can put them almost anywhere. Logs burn at 600-1000 degrees F or more and hold a lot of heat in case of a tipover, etc. You will see smoke deposits almost immediately, not "over time". Wood smoke is very dirty. It's also likely that ...


5

Every place I've lived has city or state laws that prohibit this. In Virginia, the law says no open fires (exludes bonfire which is 50') within 25' of a structure.. So, don't do this. If you are intent on continuing anyway, sketchy, unproven advice can be read below... Ten feet clearance above the flame would be needed. Wood fires can reach over 2000 F (...


5

Reflection of radiant heat is what you would be after. If you could magically hang it, one of the best would be a metal surface above the fire reflecting heat back down to everyone. Using an upside down cone or pyramid shape, with the middle point centered over the burner and the angles set so that the surfaces would reflect the fire and heat (radiant heat ...


4

You should line it with firebrick or (since you like molding and casting things) castable refractory. Edit: on second thought, stick to hard firebrick - most castable does not like to get wet. Regular concrete is prone to spalling & cracking in direct fire exposure. Depending on the shape of the "pit" a 2" layer of sand can work, if it will stay put (ie,...


4

Find a scrap tire rim, and place it on top of four or five bricks. Voila: one excellent firepit.


4

The smoke alone is going to choke you out. Even a small fire in this location is a genuine hazard. The overhead roof is way to close. The fire department would go nuts if they know you wanted to do this.


4

The answer is RAILROAD TIES. The timbers in your photo are Railroad Ties. The railroad will change the ties on a regular basis. They are impregnated with creosote and as a result they are very heavy. In Alaska the railroad will give the old ones away for free occasionally. I have built retaining walls with them. For the purpose of your fire pit area they ...


4

hey we just bought end of propane tank at flea market which we will set on cut in half 55 gal drum


4

You can shape a bowl out of steel sheet with only three cheap tools: Steel snippers (for cutting a circle), approx $15. Ball nose hammer (hit it until it becomes a bowl), approx $10. Piece of wood (to place below the sheet while hammering), available free anywhere. I would say it will take around 20-50 hours of work to make a 50 cm diameter bowl this way. ...


4

You can build the basic structure with these bricks, then line the fire pit itself with fire bricks. That's how fireplaces are made.


3

Galvanized gives no benefit. However.the tiny mount of zinc oxide produced would be no problem . I would suggest a local weld shop may have some stock to make you something. Material at least 1/8" ( 3 mm) thick if you want it to last awhile. Stainless steel is pretty common, either the magnetic ( like auto exhaust) or non-magnetic. Stainless would not need ...


3

Use "Stove Black" paint: Image stolen from internet and not an endorsement for any particular brand.


3

If you see any charcoal grill should work. Just use the bottom and you can cut the legs to height. If you get the right paint you can paint it or build your "pit" to suit the shape of the grill bottom. Recycle the top or even keep it to snuff out your fires.


2

The gravel is a good idea because reasons. Reason one being that gravel provides much better drainage than sand which will help keep the rather nasty water (rainwater through ashes is the traditional way to make lye) out of the yard or from freezing and heaving in the winter. The second reason being that gravel compacts better than sand, and can be ...


2

If you want to have a fire pit there, go get yourself a nice propane fire pit. If you want to have a wood fire there, you'll have to build some type of chimney to direct the heat/smoke away from the ceiling. If you're really ambitious, you could build an outdoor fireplace. Just make sure the chimney is high enough above the roof, to meet local codes.


2

I came up with this in about an hour with stuff laying around my blacksmiths shop. Just happened to have a firebowl from a storebought pit. The tripod is made of 1/2" hot rolled square and the hangars are 1/4" sq. All in all probably 15 bucks worth of metal. Super easy to make and super portable as well, as it can be taken apart and hangs flat on a hook on a ...


2

Those are railroad ties They are used in the track bed of railroad track. They are typically either 6"x8" or 7"x9", and 8' long (your photo does a good job of hiding the joints). They weigh 150-200 pounds. They are heavily laden with creosote preservative, so you won't be doing any organic gardening near them... And using them in a sandbox or around kids ...


1

If you really want to "make it, not buy it" and you can't shape metal, castable refractory or fireclay are the materials that come to mind - otherwise you're just buying something (but not called a firepit) and plonking it down as a firepit (IMHO.) Clay oven (for baking bread) builders might be a better-than usual source of info on using the material. ...


1

I have the exact same fire table and mine does the same thing! I even pull it inside during the MN winter's, but to no avail, I am refinishing it every year! It is definitely a poorly made product. I have had mine for 4 years and when it started peeling right away, I contacted the mfg and received my money back. So then it was worth it to me to keep it and ...


1

did something cause this... is this just a poor quality product? Yes and yes. I suspect that freeze/thaw cycles caused this damage. can I reasonably repair this, and if so how? It's hard to tell from the picture but it looks like this is a resin/fiberglass material (you can see glass mat fibers in the broken spot at lower left of picture). You could ...


1

I doubt enough heat will travel downward to damage the pavers, though you might consider a couple inches of sand below the lava rock as extra security. Even if you crack a paver, is that a big deal? Keep a few extras on hand for when or if you move the heater.


1

I did more research on this topic and decided to go with CSST (corrugated stainless steel tubing) inside a PVC conduit. All material is available at Home Depot. Good references are propane101.com and homeflex.com BTW, I don't have a natural gas line in my home.


1

"what (are) the advantages of having one..." "to avoid direct heating of the surrounding rock/concrete" Yes, the advantage is to reduce direct conductive and radiant heat transfer to the surrounding material. Heating clay bricks, rocks, stones, concrete, decorative bricks/pavers, etc. will cause them to crack and crumble. Sometimes immediately, sometimes ...


1

(edit Most barrels...) won't last very long as fire pits. I know this from burning trash when I was a kid. By the time the barrel was full it was falling apart. I never counted, but I would expect it to work well for about 10-20 burns and maybe 50-60 burns before its paper thin and falling apart. Edit: The thickness of the metal is what matters. 18 gauge ...


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