23

Horizontal: Pros will fit top piece to ceiling first and cutoff bottom piece for a 1/4 to 1/2 gap at floor. The tapered joint is easy to fill. You can also get a tapered butt joint by hanging the butt ends between studs and using a floating backer with a depressed center area that forms the "butt taper". They are available commercially or can be homemade....


23

According to Chapter 3 of the Gypsum Construction Handbook, published by USG, manufacturer of SHEETROCK® Brand Gypsum Panels... Perpendicular vs. Parallel Application Gypsum board may be applied perpendicular (long edges of board at right angles to the framing members) or parallel (long edges parallel to framing). Fire-rated partitions may ...


13

A: Horizontal Aesthetically, a vertical install can look very nice since you don't have any butt joints between two non-beveled edges. Those non-beveled edges create 4' long humps that can be seen with careful observation (and more so with a bad mudding job). However, for structural shear strength, drywall is typically installed horizontally. This bridges ...


12

I would not risk hanging a glass shelf with those strips. They are meant for hanging things directly from (like a towel, hair dryer, etc.), not a shelf that sticks out. Instead of just pulling down on the strip, it will pull down and away, almost a guaranteed recipe for broken glass. Unfortunately there is no way to anchor something to the wall without ...


12

For starters, I am going to guess you used a water based urethane instead of an oil based product? I have never seen a good oil based product react as you described to simple spills. I have seen some damage caused by very hot items being placed on a urethane finish, but normally, liquids will bead up and not penetrate the finish. Even though the water based ...


9

Start by making a template. Using a dry-erase marker, draw a line on the sink where it will meet the new cabinet cutout. You can hold a ruler flat against the rectangular piece shown in the photo to guide the marker. Temporarily remove the currently installed rectangle and replace it with a rectangle of material from which the template will be cut. Cut ...


8

I have a similar workbench but instead of finishing it, I screwed down (no glue) two layers of hardboard. It's cheap so I don't mind dinging it up and since it's only screwed down, it'll be easy to replace when it gets too dinged up.


6

Step 1: Go to Home Depot or Lowes and raid the paint department for paint cards that look similar to the color of your bathroom wall. Step 2: Take the cards home and hold them up to the wall one at a time. You may want to get a friend to stand outside the room or get as far away as possible and view the card from multiple angles. Turn the lights on and off, ...


6

The epoxy glaze you cited is what us old timers used to call casting resin. We use it on bar tops to give good gloss and a hard finish. Sounds like a good choice to me, but several coats of good oil based urethane will also give you good results. Good Luck


5

The gloss in clear finishes is reduced by flatting agents which are suspended in the clear finish. Flatting agents are tiny particles that reflect some of the light back, thereby reducing the sheen of the finish. If they settle out or are not mixed well, then the finish will be more glossy, so it's possible you did not mix the finish as well the second ...


5

Can exposure to heat in the can or while drying affect the sheen of polyurethane? No. Is there anything I can do to compensate? Yes... As a hardwood flooring installer for 4 years, I often recommended against any kind of gloss finish (It looks great at first, then it looks horrible for awhile, then it looks okay - but isn't glossy anymore). I often ...


5

Definitely the Brad nails. The finish nails will leave larger holes (16 gauge vs 18 gauge usually) and will be more likely to split the wood. Based on the size of your shoe, i dont think you could use pin nails (18-23 gauge). The Big Box home improvement store always sell kits with finish, brad, and pin nailers for pretty cheap. Some have 2 guns, some 3, ...


5

I'd get a 2 x 4, trim it to fit the length and height of your trim piece and screw it in. The horizontal lines are the piece of trim that will run along the outside of the staircase.


5

When I looked into this question in the past, I reached the same conclusion as JayL, plus one additional handy rule: If I can smell the finish at all, it is not completely cured yet. So when my thinned poly coats feel cured to the touch, I lean in and take a deep breath. Usually there will still be a faint whiff that lasts up to a couple more weeks.


5

Wood fillers for filling grain are very different from those used for structural repairs. Grain fillers are diluted and rubbed into the wood grain. See the attached listing from Constantines, one of the leading woodworking suppliers in the U.S.: http://www.constantines.com/pastewoodfiller.aspx They are also a source of components and books on building ...


5

Try iron-on edge banding. Iron it on (you will have excess probably) and then trim the excess. You can usually get it pretty close to the color of your stain that you choose.


5

Vertical Only, here’s the proof & truth! Why and How Horizontal’s Wrong (and why Vertical’s right)...don’t ruin new from the start: 1 – Defective Seam - Horizontal rows needing more than one drywall panel creates (instead of avoids) butt-joint humps, which are not flat and are a twice (minimum) the effort defect. Outlet and switch cover-plates, window ...


5

Do what a professional would do - don't touch it when wet. Sand the affected areas with fine grit and re-stain, leave until it dries completely, then move, flip over and do the opposite side, etc. Apply the poly in the same manner. You cannot handle pieces until they dry fully. You also cannot handle them with hands that are wet with finish.


5

Raw linseed oil does not harden. That is the fundamental difference between raw and boiled (often chemically treated rather than actually boiled, these days) linseed oil. It will be gummy for a very, very long time. You would probably want to remove as much of the surface oil as possible and re-oil with a hardening oil - boiled linseed, walnut, etc.


4

Lots of good answers here. I was a finisher in a cabinet shop for many years and this is how used to do it. Avoid anything with silicone to get on your hands or near your wood project. It causes fish eye dimple defects in your clear coat and will ruin the finish. Such items with silicone include lubricants, water repellent sprays, etc. Wash your hands ...


4

In the past what I have done is to isolate 1 room, generally in the basement, increase the heat to that room and open the window while running a fan. In general, once I've closed the can and am only waiting for the piece to dry the fumes tend to get much less noticeable and I can start closing the window. This method doesn't prevent fumes from reaching ...


4

I'd frame the entire wall vertically where you have less than 1' of height. You'll be unlikely to get much out of that space anyway, considering you need to get from the door past everything else in the closet that should be stacked up to get to the back of the closet. In practice, I rarely see a sloped ceiling go below 3'. Then you just trim that section of ...


4

Some finish nailers will shoot both trim nails and brad nails. Look for one of those. And yes, a 2" nail thru just about 1" shoe molding should be fine as long as it hits the baseboard straight on.


4

If you want to fill a large gap with caulk, the first thing you do is fill the gap with a caulk "backer rod" that's made of foam. They come in various diameters are are typically found near the weather stripping in a home improvement store. You shove the backer in with a putty knife (not too deep, just enough to be below the surface), and then cover with ...


4

A standard approach to sealing is polyurethane, either brush on, rub on or spray on. If the old finish is pretty solid, a light sanding may do. If it is not adhering well or where the piece is worn and stained, a more thorough sanding is needed. In all cases, you need to wipe off all dust, preferably with a tack cloth before finishing. Wiping down with ...


4

You could use MDF. Much cheaper than cabinet grade plywood, and will finish up just fine with paint.


4

Less wiping. More time before sanding. Unless you go to something extreme like epoxy putty, it all shrinks. If you leave the filler proud of (sticking above) the hole, let it cure fully, and then sand it down, it should work. In extreme cases you may need to refill and let that cure, but that's adding more time to the program which is probably not good ...


4

Here's a few options I can think of. Lap joint If the wood is a bit thicker than the drywall, you could use a router to remove some of the material on the back side of the lowest plank (may require installing an additional plank, or extending the drywall). Then allow the lowest plank to lap over the drywall. Make sure you leave enough of a gap between the ...


4

One method is to take a board of the right height, plumb it with the bookcase next to the wall. Then take a compass or something to hold your pencil at the right distance and scribe a line along the board following the wall contour. Start at the bottom where it's closest to the bookcase. You don't want to leave such a thin edge that it's hard to cut. I'd ...


4

You could put down a bead of construction adhesive under the sill plate. That will glue it to the tiles. You do need the wall secured somehow because you will not want to be seeing it move around as you finish it out and put said wall into deployment.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible