25

Horizontal: Pros will fit top piece to ceiling first and cutoff bottom piece for a 1/4 to 1/2 gap at floor. The tapered joint is easy to fill. You can also get a tapered butt joint by hanging the butt ends between studs and using a floating backer with a depressed center area that forms the "butt taper". They are available commercially or can be homemade....


23

According to Chapter 3 of the Gypsum Construction Handbook, published by USG, manufacturer of SHEETROCK® Brand Gypsum Panels... Perpendicular vs. Parallel Application Gypsum board may be applied perpendicular (long edges of board at right angles to the framing members) or parallel (long edges parallel to framing). Fire-rated partitions may ...


13

A: Horizontal Aesthetically, a vertical install can look very nice since you don't have any butt joints between two non-beveled edges. Those non-beveled edges create 4' long humps that can be seen with careful observation (and more so with a bad mudding job). However, for structural shear strength, drywall is typically installed horizontally. This bridges ...


12

For starters, I am going to guess you used a water based urethane instead of an oil based product? I have never seen a good oil based product react as you described to simple spills. I have seen some damage caused by very hot items being placed on a urethane finish, but normally, liquids will bead up and not penetrate the finish. Even though the water based ...


9

Start by making a template. Using a dry-erase marker, draw a line on the sink where it will meet the new cabinet cutout. You can hold a ruler flat against the rectangular piece shown in the photo to guide the marker. Temporarily remove the currently installed rectangle and replace it with a rectangle of material from which the template will be cut. Cut ...


8

I have a similar workbench but instead of finishing it, I screwed down (no glue) two layers of hardboard. It's cheap so I don't mind dinging it up and since it's only screwed down, it'll be easy to replace when it gets too dinged up.


6

The epoxy glaze you cited is what us old timers used to call casting resin. We use it on bar tops to give good gloss and a hard finish. Sounds like a good choice to me, but several coats of good oil based urethane will also give you good results. Good Luck


5

When I looked into this question in the past, I reached the same conclusion as JayL, plus one additional handy rule: If I can smell the finish at all, it is not completely cured yet. So when my thinned poly coats feel cured to the touch, I lean in and take a deep breath. Usually there will still be a faint whiff that lasts up to a couple more weeks.


5

Try iron-on edge banding. Iron it on (you will have excess probably) and then trim the excess. You can usually get it pretty close to the color of your stain that you choose.


5

Vertical Only, here’s the proof & truth! Why and How Horizontal’s Wrong (and why Vertical’s right)...don’t ruin new from the start: 1 – Defective Seam - Horizontal rows needing more than one drywall panel creates (instead of avoids) butt-joint humps, which are not flat and are a twice (minimum) the effort defect. Outlet and switch cover-plates, window ...


5

Do what a professional would do - don't touch it when wet. Sand the affected areas with fine grit and re-stain, leave until it dries completely, then move, flip over and do the opposite side, etc. Apply the poly in the same manner. You cannot handle pieces until they dry fully. You also cannot handle them with hands that are wet with finish.


5

Raw linseed oil does not harden. That is the fundamental difference between raw and boiled (often chemically treated rather than actually boiled, these days) linseed oil. It will be gummy for a very, very long time. You would probably want to remove as much of the surface oil as possible and re-oil with a hardening oil - boiled linseed, walnut, etc.


4

Lots of good answers here. I was a finisher in a cabinet shop for many years and this is how used to do it. Avoid anything with silicone to get on your hands or near your wood project. It causes fish eye dimple defects in your clear coat and will ruin the finish. Such items with silicone include lubricants, water repellent sprays, etc. Wash your hands ...


4

If you want to fill a large gap with caulk, the first thing you do is fill the gap with a caulk "backer rod" that's made of foam. They come in various diameters are are typically found near the weather stripping in a home improvement store. You shove the backer in with a putty knife (not too deep, just enough to be below the surface), and then cover with ...


4

A standard approach to sealing is polyurethane, either brush on, rub on or spray on. If the old finish is pretty solid, a light sanding may do. If it is not adhering well or where the piece is worn and stained, a more thorough sanding is needed. In all cases, you need to wipe off all dust, preferably with a tack cloth before finishing. Wiping down with ...


4

You could use MDF. Much cheaper than cabinet grade plywood, and will finish up just fine with paint.


4

Less wiping. More time before sanding. Unless you go to something extreme like epoxy putty, it all shrinks. If you leave the filler proud of (sticking above) the hole, let it cure fully, and then sand it down, it should work. In extreme cases you may need to refill and let that cure, but that's adding more time to the program which is probably not good ...


4

Here's a few options I can think of. Lap joint If the wood is a bit thicker than the drywall, you could use a router to remove some of the material on the back side of the lowest plank (may require installing an additional plank, or extending the drywall). Then allow the lowest plank to lap over the drywall. Make sure you leave enough of a gap between the ...


4

One method is to take a board of the right height, plumb it with the bookcase next to the wall. Then take a compass or something to hold your pencil at the right distance and scribe a line along the board following the wall contour. Start at the bottom where it's closest to the bookcase. You don't want to leave such a thin edge that it's hard to cut. I'd ...


4

You could put down a bead of construction adhesive under the sill plate. That will glue it to the tiles. You do need the wall secured somehow because you will not want to be seeing it move around as you finish it out and put said wall into deployment.


4

Or you could buy a ramset that is a powder driven concrete anchor, no drilling is required and would have a minimal effect on the asbestos.


4

There are many ways to fill the holes. Here's a good link that shows a comparison of what the results look like for six different methods: http://fixthisbuildthat.com/6-ways-to-plug-fill-pocket-holes-how-to/. Getting the appearance to match in a visible area is the problem. You can under-fill the hole with any type of filler and then fill the last bit ...


4

Casing should almost always lap onto the current window jamb. It's the final edge for the wall finish. In your case, you have a slight level variation, which is usually handled with an extension jamb. You can also create a rabbet in your casing, which would result in an extension integrated into the casing. In any case, the gap between the jambs should be ...


4

Nickel is softer than chrome but chrome is brittle. Many high-carbon tools have a chrome plating, but many times there are other softer metals flash coated first to allow the other metals to "stick" together better. On steel bumpers, a flash coat of copper allows the chrome to stick. Electroplating with CVD chemical vapor deposition similar layers are ...


3

Drywall compound by itself might not be the best solution since its not really a great gap filler; it requires a backing to adhere to which is why you use either paper or fiberglass tape when putting up drywall. As tester101 suggested, you could use crown molding or quarter round to cover it up. I would imagine that filling it with mortar might give the ...


3

I've used spar urethane for this purpose. Be aware, though, that it will outgas for a long time if you don't expose it to the sun.


3

I'ld be scraping it off with a paint scraper: One of these ones: Then sanding it down once the bulk was gone, (save gumming up a ton of sand paper)


3

TL;DR: Hang the sheets horizontally. I have worked in a 2-3 man wallboard hanging only. We would hang around 100+ boards a day and complete a home with garage in 2 1/2 days to 3 max. The garage is 5/8 thick 12'x4' about 60 of them. The house would have about 100+ per level at 1/2" thick 12' x 4'. Always hang the ceiling first and always work into the jog. ...


3

I am red seal journeyman interior systems mechanic I can put up 100 or more sheets a day by standing vertical. Walls over 12' high stager but joints with backing added for proper fire rating. If you prefer horizontal then add backing every 4' along bevel for fire rating so ask yourself what makes since is faster and nicer finish least amount backing.when ...


3

Stringers are the zigzag style angled beams that hold up conventional stairs. They are used on each side ot the staircase and sometimes in the middle as well. They hold up the treads and the risers (the vertical boards) are attached to them. Image 1 is basically floating treads on the stringers and using the risers as faces of drawer fronts. As the ...


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