Hot answers tagged

10

Your filter is in the return vent in the wall. Look at photo #5 in your post and you’ll see the markings of a 12x12x1” filter. Flip out the two tabs at the bottom and the grill should swing out to allow you to change the filter.


5

You can get "drain tile sock" or drain tiles with "sock" installed at just about any place that sells building materials. These are used where you want to allow the water to pass but block dirt, sand, and gravel.


4

Despite the fact that Amazon is no doubt delighted that you think they are the only place to order stuff online, they are not. I would suggest expanding your online vendor search considerably. And no, unless you somehow know when the valve should be actuated and do so at those times, and only those times, "simply bypassing it" can be clearly described as ...


4

This is more of an opinion based question rather than a "how do I do this" question. Opinion based questions are discouraged here. But I'm going to answer anyway and this is just my opinion. The new oil got slightly contaminated by the old oil left in the filter. In the distant past it was a common practice to change the oil filter with every ...


3

...you have some of the best tap water in the country. Either remove it completely, or possibly use a carbon filter cartridge if there's enough chlorine to bother you. If the filter looks off, the filter housing probably needs a good cleaning/sanitizing. Which one (or how many) of the bottled water companies is just bottled NYC tap water?


3

I've installed many filter systems this way, it's very common. (random from web; not my install) Installing the filters themselves is pretty straight-forward, with a couple things to note: Some people (including this picture above) install a bypass to the filters, but I'd actually not recommend that. It's too easy to accidentally open and have mostly ...


3

You are (and may not realize if you did not pay attention in geometry class) talking about a nearly 2/3 reduction in pipe size (area/cross section) when you go from 1-1/4" to 3/4". Area of a circle = Pi r squared. 1.23 .vs. 0.44 square inches for the pipes under consideration here. That will definitely have "a negative impact on pressure and ...


3

Look for cut to fit foam filter for a window air conditioner. It's roughly 1/4" thick very lightweight foam so it doesn't reduce airflow very much, but it'll catch most pet fur.


3

I do not see a filter and would not expect it to be in the attic. I don’t like filters in restricted access spaces so in the case like yours. I will put a 14x20 on the intake(s) that fits between studs or joists and is accessible from the living space. The filter needs to be on the intake because they filter out dust and debris that will get stuck in the ...


2

Better quality filters generally will be directional. This is due to the filter containing a coarse and fine media or one side being reinforced with wire or mesh to support the filter against the flow of air. It may also be designed to flow air better in one direction. If you can feel or see a density difference between sides the least dense side should face ...


2

The Calculations which I have done (metric conversion) indicate that your water flows through your filter about 1.8 times per hour. but i will address that later. Firstly. the reason(s) why your pump needs to run for certain durations will be dependant on a few factors - which need to be managed/considered before you do your calculations Water filtration ...


2

This is more of a comment but too long... I was a pool boy through college. I have also owned 3 pools. What you are doing has too many variables. You have temperature, environment, chlorine levels, quality of original water, amount of swimmers, pump size, plumbing size, pool depth, almost anything around the pool is a variable. So as a kid I would clean ...


2

Single versus dual stage is easy; dual stage is essentially two single-stage filters in succession. Bulkier, more expensive. Better removal of contaminants. Installation is the same. Reverse osmosis is an entirely different technology. It generally has a prefilter because RO doesn't deal with particulates, only dissolved chemicals. It does handle those ...


2

After enough research and talking with a few different companies, this is what I have found out. Water Softener - this is good for removing Calcium, Iron, Magnesium, etc out of the water. It mainly used for getting a small degree of minerals out of the water. Using it primarily for high iron removal will decrease the life of the softener. Chlorination - ...


2

You want to get an activated carbon filter (see this answer for an overview of how it works). You'll probably want to look at a standard 10" filter housing and a matching carbon filter, both of which are readily available online and in retail everywhere, including the big box stores. This can go under your sink or elsewhere upstream. There are clear ...


2

I have a Lennox too and I hate the filter situation with a fury of 1000 suns: It's just sitting in the furnace against the return duct - previous owner left a VERY dirty one taped with aluminum tape that took me a long time to peel. I've been using masking tape. One of these days I'll find time to fabricate a filter box to sit between the return duct and ...


2

In my area most duct systems are too restrictive as it is. Adding an extra filter would make them more so unless the other filter was removed and the new one was less restrictive. Problems could include AC icing and furnace overheating. As always you can try it and see.


2

the air filter is designed to clean the air flow prior to passing through the fan or the heat exchanger. its a common misconception that the air filter cleans the air for us humans. its there to keep the air clean for the machinery. its a secondary benefit that the air is cleaner for us. if you get a buildup of dust inside the fan, you get overheating of ...


2

The white stuff is probably calcium (99% of the time)... so your water is "hard". When the water is cooled, the calcium aggregates and precipitates (white stuff). A filter will not remove dissolved ions (like calcium). A water softener will replace calcium with sodium. That should solve the the white precipitate issue. However, before spending money, have ...


2

That's brass, not copper, and it looks to me like a typical hose fitting with a pressed-in rubber washer. Try grasping the washer with a needle-nose pliers and pulling it out. My guess is that the screen will follow. If the washer is damaged or worn it can probably be replaced with an inexpensive part from a hardware or garden store.


2

Your furnace definitely has a filter. To access the filter compartment remove the lower of the two metal panels on the front. The filter location is horizontal at the very bottom in the plane of the very bottom of the furnace. It will probably have a metal loop resting on it to keep it in place in the upward air stream. You may want to remove that metal loop ...


2

I'm not familiar with cleaning these, just installing new stufff. If this filter behaves as a washer does, I'm suggesting that you install another one at the valve end of the ( stainless mesh wrapped) flexible supply hose. When it gets embedded in the female threads, just dip these ends in the cleaner without removing filter screen. I've had clients whose ...


2

Do you really need a pipe out for potential harmful gas for pump? Not in an otherwise properly plumbed system, but you should consider adding a stand pipe to help protect yourself from an overflow during a system failure. As long as there's a check valve on the discharge pipe that would mean there's no chance for sewer gas, just moldy bucket smell after a ...


2

Good idea. There's really no problem with that approach aside from the stagnant water that will accumulate in the faucet's hot water stub, which could be a health concern (or just gross). Instead, split your filtered water supply and run it to both the hot and cold sides of the faucet. This has the additional benefit of making the faucet flow full in all ...


2

My dryer its just a metal screen. Wire mesh also would be a name to ask for.


2

I am not quite sure just what you are trying to do but from the picture you posted, the fitting on the top is a standard fitting for utilizing 1/4" OD plastic tubing and the bottom fitting is a standard 1/4" OD compression fitting. To use the top fitting with plastic tubing you cut the end of the tubing with a sharp object for a clean cut. Then, you slip the ...


2

1/4" quick connect fitting available all good plumbing and hardware stores, just make sure you cut the tube square and it is pushed in all the way.


2

You may have the issue of a reduced flow rate as the system has been designed so that all the components “match”. This could cause poor performance or even overheating as the motor works harder. You could contact the manufacturer for their advice.


2

It depends on which model and what rate of flow you are using at the time. The manufacturer's spec sheet has the details: Big Blue Filter Specs See the section titled SPECIFICATIONS AND PERFORMANCE In the table there look at the right-hand column for INITIAL ∆P. Also refer to the graph: PRESSURE DROP VS FLOW RATE EDIT: In your comment you said: My ...


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