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I would not bother with that anchor bolt idea. I'd go with a lot of small anchors rather than a few big ones. Concrete screws, Tapcon brand are popular, should work. I'd attach the metal top, middle and bottom spaced maybe 2' horizontally. You'll need a masonry bit and a nutdriver bit the right size for the concrete screws, and a metal bit slightly ...


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Re-wooden fence posts. If the bottom of the posts have rotted in the concrete base the rotted wood can be removed by drilling or other means and the holes reused saving a lot of effort and time and expense. I have used this method.


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Use wood blocks and C-clamps to straighten the bar. The rough sketch hopefully illustrates what I mean. C-clamps are not shown in drawing. C-clamp


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There's more than one way to join galvanized wire, and a few ways you can do this. Some are better than others: Solder: you can use solder to join ends. This is cheap if you have the equipment, and can do it in the field Cable crimps: you crimp pieces of softer metal around the cable(s) you are trying to join. This requires crimps and a crimping tool, you ...


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Pickets should not be in contact with the ground because they will hold back water like this and they will rot out very quickly. This should definitely be on the installer to fix. Additionally, the pickets should not be installed so tightly against each other that they're sealing water in. The pickets will expand and contract with humidity and need room to ...


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Another option might be to install a drain basin in that corner, and connect it to a pipe that runs underground beneath the fence.


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Structurally, maybe. The weight will be twice as much (assuming two rails) on the same wood at the notch due to the larger lumber. This could result in more sagging or even breakage. Some other ideas... Add posts and route around the tree ______ ___________| | ___________| | |______| | | __|_|_ ...


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the posts in the fence appear to be untreated cedar (the entire fence appears to be untreated cedar actually) so if those posts are just going into the dirt then they will rot out within a few years and then you won't have this problem anymore as you won't have the fence anymore. You can pick up a small circular saw that is easier to control for a job like ...


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I have the same problem with a fence I am building. Wooden privacy fence, wooden fence posts in concrete. My neighbor suggested that I cut the fence beams (the horizontal 2 X 4's) in half and attach them together using hinges. That way the fence could "bend" around the tree. I haven't tried it yet, but perhaps something like that could work for you....


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Anything directly against the fence will allow moisture to accumulate and hasten decay. If you want a fast, simple solution, lay any rigid board against the fence to the new grade level with spacer shims to keep contact minimal. It'll do the job. Don't use plastic. It'll look bad and trap even more moisture. Ideally you'd create a retaining wall a few inches ...


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