New answers tagged

1

That screw in the handle has to be removed with an allen wrench. Then remove the handle. The chrome dome piece then has to be unscrewed to expose the cartridge. There could be another brass nut to remove too before pulling out the cartridge. Remember to turn off the water before doing any of this. Hopefully there are shut off valves under the sink. If not, ...


0

If there are no usable threads on the end of your faucet spout, then, short of rigging something up with a piece of rubber hose and some hose clamps, you can't use that style of handheld bidet. Instead, perhaps consider this type: https://rinseworks.com/product/abt-360-the-aquaus-360-handheld-bidet-for-toilet-nsf-certified-3-year-warranty It connects to your ...


2

If the issue is limescale that has built up over the years, then vinegar is the miracle solvent that will dissolve it for you. Any weak acid will do, but vinegar is cheap is readily available. You can either put it on a sponge and scrub or else apply it to tissue paper and leave for a few hours or overnight. You could even put some in your kettle and boil ...


4

Does "sticky" mean it is hard to turn? If so ,pretty easy fix ; remove the handle, unthread the packing nut/collar on the stem, replace packing or make your own by putting several wraps of teflon tape-pipe dope on the stem , reassemble. Adjust the collar/nut tightness to seal and give the amount of turn resistance you want.( This is all done with ...


5

The photo appears to be of a very old, possibly nickel-plated brass fixture with the plating worn off and a significant copper-based corrosion process ongoing. I doubt that you'll find any quick fix here as you'll either need to replace it entirely or completely disassemble it, remove all corrosion from it, re-plate it as appropriate, and replace all of its ...


1

You could make a clamp out of two 2" x 4" pieces of wood 0.5" or 0.75" thick which would hold the fitting against the tub. Two screws or two bolts in the plane of the tub would pull the two pieces of wood together around the fitting. You could cut or rasp notches in the two pieces to keep them in place as the clamp is tightened.


1

Remove the incorrect fitting, replace with a drop-ear elbow, and mount a hunk of wood to mount the drop ear elbow to. This will be awkward and annoying to do (through that hole) but should be possible. You may (or will) need a longer hunk of pipe for the tub spout mount. Other ways might be possible, but will be kludges, (like the "giant glob of ...


0

Look on the photo. Just under the tap knob, I think I can see a ring that can be unscrewed to take the long outlet pipe off.


8

It looks to me like the nut on the spout would turn independently of the spout itself. Put the faucet back in its original position and turn that nut while holding the spout stationary. See if you can thread that off and pull the spout out, then you'll be able to rotate the faucet body. If that's not the case, it looks like you'd be able to find a position ...


0

You only need to disconnect the spray wand if you have a portable connection to the faucet nozzle with the faucet in the on position. If you connect to the plumbing so the faucet is in the off position you do not need to remove your sprayer. Sorry I did not catch that sooner but connecting prior to the faucet it self is the same as every other point on the ...


1

Caulk may work to some extent, but silicone is soft and doesn't withstand movement terribly well. I'd check whether there's a seal missing at that location. Maybe it was installed in the wrong position. If not, I'd install a thin rubber or silicone washer. This would mean disconnecting the faucet supply lines and removing the mounting nut, but it will result ...


0

The replacement product everyone is looking for is the Nibco T090722 product for small diameter spline faucets. That link takes you to one of the few places, Menards, that still have these, (as Nibco stopped making them probably 8 or more years ago). That's why you can't find them in an big box, small or specialty hardware stores. I had the same problem and ...


2

Looking at the drawing and photo I'd have thought you just need to get a small screwdriver or awl in the gap you've shown there, and the one on the other side and gradually work it out, ensuring it stays straight. If you work it out a bit at a time, alternating sides, make sure to support the side you've just moved, or it may simply pivot on the middle ...


2

The threaded part on the valve where the hose connects seems, from the picture, to be rather short. It is possible that the part on the end of the hose is interfering with the valve body (represented by the green arrows in the diagram below) before the rubber hose washer gets a decent amount of compression on it. If this is the case you may be able to ...


1

If there are no obvious means of disconnecting, it ALMOST has to be a "pop off" design. What other options are there??? I'd take a putty knife and gently pry on it from different sides and see if it "wants" to break free.


-1

I think I see the set screw at the base if the handle. Usually a small Allen wrench.


2

It looks to me like there is something screwed onto the end of the spigot, probably a backflow preventer. Try to unscrew the wide ring that you are connecting the hose to. These wear out and/or get gummed up and stop working properly. For reference. here is a photo of such a device I found on the internet:


Top 50 recent answers are included