New answers tagged

1

In both cases I see a U shaped metal foot that attached to the fitting by two spurs that pass through hole in it, This is probably tigtened (and loosened) from above. however if you spread the arms of the U apart it will let go.


3

I learned a little about these doo dads this year when the two on our home started leaking after the winter freeze we had in Texas. The rubber grommets inside both went bad. After trying to get them off with no success, I took a picture and headed down to my favorite plumber dude on isle 9 at our local Home Depot. He laughed and smirked a little, then told ...


0

You need to have a plumber's wrench/plyer to hold the nut below the sink, and a helper to hold/adjust the handle into the correct position.


1

Yes, pictures are good to support your questions. Depending on valve, sometimes you need a special tool. But yes, post pictures. You may require to pull hard on valve or tap, depending on how it’s grip better. Due to water hardness valve can be stuck hard.


1

Isolate the problem. Turn off all faucets. Turn off the stop valve on the hot water at the faucet you care about. Unscrew the faucet connector from the stop valve. Put a pot or something to deflect the water and a large bucket below it (or get a flexible connector and route it to a bucket or something). Make sure you have someone near the main water ...


0

If you have separate faucets for hot and cold water, the screw that holds the hot water faucet washer may have come loose, allowing the washer to move around, vibrate and cause turbulence. You might call this "sputtering". If this is what happened, it's a pretty easy fix. Turn off the hot water supply below the sink. After removing the faucet ...


1

Movement in the hot water supply line below the sink may be touching the shutoff valve thus creating a resonant effect. Try partially closing the hot water shutoff valve to determine if it's modified angle stops the sputtering. If this stops the sputtering, dampen movement in the hot water supply line or block anything that could touch the shutoff valve when ...


0

For whom may run into the same problem: Remove the metal button. Before this, block your sink to prevent losing the button or other things in the sink. See into the hole with a mirror and a BRIGHT flashlight. I tried different flashlights, eventually a really bright one helped. Loosen up the screw in the hole and remove the handle. Try ALL sizes of hex ...


2

That piece could be press fitted into the valve body and heavily corroded but since the cartridge screw is accessible with just the handle being removed (unusual), try removing it. Never use a pipe wrench on chrome. Even if you could remove it now, you'd never find a replacement unless you lucked out at a plumbing supply store.


1

Sometimes the Allen screw in there is corroded or stripped. In this case, you may need to drill it and use a screw extractor to remove it. I have done this many time with these type of faucets.


1

Call Moen at the service number on their website. Their support is very knowledgeable and helpful, and will likely mail you a replacement part for free if you are covered under their warranty.


3

You need to get a small mirror and bright flashlight and reflect the light into that hole so you can see what you're dealing with. Just about every screw in those handles needs an Allen wrench to remove it. It could be SAE or metric. Once you get that handle off, you have to loosen the chrome collar at the seam you can see in your photo. A strap wrench or ...


1

Or should I just disassemble everything and bring them to Home depot or Lowe's for help? Yes, take the cartridge to Lowes and look for a match. If you can not find a match then go to a plumbing supply house.


0

The long hexagonal nut has to be opened. It has 2 slits to accept a big screwdriver as well. It seems to be a faucet for a boiler or tankless heater,which might require an "open", i.e. pressureless faucet in order to enable the hot water to expand and leave during heating up. In that case a drippling is normal and not an indication for a defect ...


1

Looks like they might be commercial quality, hence the 5 year limited warranty. More specifically, according to Delta Customer Service, HDF stands for "Heavy Duty Faucet."


1

Looks like a Price Pfister (or import copy thereof). Looks like a good quality faucet that is worth saving. Note- you don't necessarily need to buy new "cartridges", these are totally rebuild-able unless physically damaged. The washers and o-rings should be readily available at a good hardware shop or plumbing shop (maybe not at big-box center). ...


2

You should be able to turn that brass colored knob counterclockwise and remove it from the stem or have the stem turn too and remove it from the diverter plate which should then drop out of the spout. Then examine it for any signs of corrosion or cracking. If damaged, a trip to a plumbing supply store might just do the trick for a replacement. You have to ...


1

So it was the diverter that is in line with the faucet. The valve inside the diverter is stuck down. It only moves a little up when the faucet is running. The valve in the downward position supplies water to sprayer which is why the sprayer was fine. Interestingly if you cycle the sprayer on and off a few times the valve loosens some and can move upward more ...


1

There are a couple common reasons why the valve(s) might be locked up: You reinstalled the valve in a position other than wide open. If the valve stem is in the closed or partially closed position (see pic below of valve that is not in the fully open position) when installed, the stem could strike the seat before the valve-body is fully tightened. This ...


0

Although the cold water eventually returned to half-pressure (hot and cold at half-pressure, warm was full pressure) my wife didn't like this and eventually convinced me to hire a professional plumber. He was able to find and clean out some screens in the line (after the braided hoses) and restore normal pressure to both hot and cold.


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Vineger. Spray the treads & the underside of the handle with white vinegar, a lot, & let it sit for about 5-10 minutes try twisting it both ways to see if it loosened at all. Repeat if necessary. It will come loose. PLUMBER 20+ YRS


0

Sometimes when you flush your water heater the sediment will get mixed with the water and find it's way to the valves that are under a sink to shut off that water supply. This happened to me. I tried different fixes but finally I had to replace that valve. When I removed it it was full of the sediment from the hot water tank. The sediment could have also ...


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