17

You need to pre-drill a large but shallow hole of the correct depth, and use the bit size recommended by the manufacturer for the material you are setting those into. Too small and you'll crack the wood/whatever. Too big and they won't hold. It matters. You might want to try on some scrap first. Did the supplier provide these nuts full knowing that ...


11

You'll need to drill holes for the sleeves the same size as the shaft, then thread them in using an Allen wrench that fits the larger sleeve socket. They're essentially screws themselves. I'd have expected that the hardware kit specified a bit size. Check the packaging, and check the hardware itself for markings. On a side note, I wouldn't trust just ...


9

If you have a micrometer, measure the outside diameter of the entry point in the barrel (illustration below) If you don't, measure with a tape measure that will do increments of 1/32". Next, measure the depth of the barrel, and mark that depth on a drill bit that is sized to the entry point of the barrel (plus a few mm to cover the depth of the screw that ...


8

What you're after is a tool called a basin wrench: It can reach up behind the sink and tighten those nuts.


6

In most cases those will work nicely. At times, though, drawing force is substantial. The world isn't flat and level and hardwoods can be stubborn. Feel free to use those screws, properly piloted and countersunk, but be prepared to use conventional flute-head screws (gold construction screws) behind hinges or in other hidden locations to do some heavy ...


5

Once the concrete is cleaned of all dust and oils, the rubber mats should stay in place, especially once you get a few of them down. If you want a little extra help, I'd offer two options: "Carpet tape" is a thin, double sided tape that's usually about 1.5" to 2" wide and can be placed on the floor under the mats. It's will be easier to remove than other ...


5

It’s based on the 1) angle of repose, and 2) weight of soil, and 3) length of deadman. 7-8kn equals about 1500 - 1,800 lbs. If the angle of repose is about 45 degrees and your soil weighs about 80 lbs. per cubic foot, then you’ll need about 2,000 lbs. (safety factor) resisting. Therefore, you need to bury your deadman about 3’ deep if the deadman is 3’ ...


4

The bolt/nut configuration you show requires high friction against the joined members to maintain tightness. You need independent locking of the nut. The most common method is to use two nuts. They are tightened against each other, rather than the captured articulating part. An alternative is to use a nut locking compound (a sort of nut glue), and not ...


3

The short answer is that, for residential framing, the only situations that call for screws are: Where building hardware specifies screw fasteners Where squeaks are a concern and adhesive would be impractical Where access is limited with respect to hammers or air nailers Where the need for later non-destructive removal is expected Everything else is ...


3

I had an idea that worked for me. I made spacers from steel brake line, and used a socket to tighten the nuts in a more convenient place for me.


3

To add to the tools that can be used in this situation is the crowfoot. Use it with an extension and a ratchet. (flank drive style pictured)


3

After some time looking for a proper solution, the only one I come up with is using a tubular wrench, and sawing the threaded supports that were too long. Maybe not the smartest workaround, but surely this faucet lacks a good design for assembling it. These are some tubular wrenches similar to the one I used:


3

A basin wrench is NOT the correct tool to try to tighten the faucet mount nuts that you show in your pictures. Due to the nature of the valve construction another type of tool is called for to tighten these. The tool will look like a hex socket end but is able to slide up over the long mounting stud to engage the nut. Tools of this nature are often made of ...


3

The 45 degree decking is the primary sub-floor. It's a technique that was widely used in the past, but has subsequently been replaced with simply dropping sheets of plywood down. In answer to your questions: 1) You can glue and screw to the sub-floor. 2) In this case, it doesn't matter. The sub-floor is carrying the load diagonally. However, if there ...


3

Have a bonfire and go buy some straight 2x4's (those certainly appear to be 2x4's) Or possibly some nicer wood, depending what you intend for this table. My eyeball assessment is that this is ordinary framing lumber ("studs") which is commonly "spruce, pine or fir" and nothing special to look at. Salvaging what you have will be tedious ...


3

Build a frame with tracks for the filters to slide into. Use U channel for the tracks. Get 4 60.75" pieces of 0.5x1x0.5 U channel and cut notches in the sides at 20.25" and 40.5" Fold them into U shapes then join them together to make a frame. Something like this Picasso. the U channels can be connected together using rivets or welding or ...


3

(One type of) Cable clip (there are other types that are called the same thing, but which are not open when installed, for instance.) Here's an image (without endorsement) from a certain large internet store: The "almost an eye hook" and thinking in terms of cable support also brings to mind bridle rings (which screw-clamp to beams, usually.) They ...


2

250lb cable ties are made, yes. "industrial zip ties" seemed to be a pretty good search string for finding sources. Probably more the cold making the plastic brittle than the basic strength of the zip tie. They do make "large, industrial" zip ties (I've seen 3 feet long and half an inch wide, and they probably go bigger) but you'll probably get better cost ...


2

You can use a special tool called a nut-splitter. Another method is to use a rotary tool (e.g. Dremel) with a cutting wheel or grinding bit. There's a strong likelihood of damaging the bolt. As a last resort you can use a smaller angle-grinder to cut through the nut and/or bolt. There's a good chance of damaging the fork (or yourself) unless you are very ...


2

I suggest before installing the taps cut the studs down to a more usable length, then just use a normal socket on them.


2

How much clearance do you have between the threaded portion and the hole you want to insert the bolt in? In most cases,the shank is cut first and then the threads are cut so the threaded portion will usually be a bit smaller than the shank. If the threaded portion fits snugly into the hole, you'll have a problem. If it's a loose fit, you'll be OK. You might ...


2

Unthreaded portions of bolts are generally just a tick under their nominal diameter. So an 8mm bolt might be 7.8mm across the shaft. Typically, the OD of threaded areas is smaller than that, so it might be an issue. You also have the possibility of bottoming out the threads if the screw goes deep into the threaded portion.


2

I know you say you are not going to put a row of heavy jars on - but you are probably going to leave that in place when you eventually move out, and the new owner may have different ideas. For this sort of application I would go for the strongest fixings available - which are a gravity toggle. Fischer claim theirs have a pull-out strength of 20kg which ...


2

I've had good luck with so-called "connecting screws". They are a two-part design, with both sides having a head. One end is like a machine screw with a pan head, the other part has a pan head, but the shaft is hollow and threaded for the opposing end to screw into. They are designed specifically for this purpose. You can get them in various lengths and ...


2

Is it possible to drill the hole to a larger diameter than the bolt and insert a metal sleeve that is slightly longer than the thickness of the 2 arms and tighten against the sleeve. This will act as a replaceable bushing and should reduce wear.


2

drill the holes larger and use threaded inserts. In the inserts are too long grind them shorter after installing them. It looks like plywood. these will hold very well in plywood.


1

Most bolts that have an unthreaded portion or shank are designed that the shank is to support the shear loads and provide more loadbearing surface than just threads. The shank is usually larger or the same as the outer diameter of the thread so it fits reasonably tightly in the holes of the pieces to be secured. Thise pieces are designed so the depth of ...


1

To answer your question, “What sort of fasteners are best for general Wood Framing?” I see that you capitalized “Wood Framing”, so I’ll concentrate on wood framing. The Code stipulates the size, type and spacing for “wood framing”. It should be noted that this is a minimum requirement, but using a 20d spike when a 16d nail is required does not improve ...


1

In a cross section of a sliding puzzle piece, one will see something akin to tongue and groove on all four sides of the piece. In the image below, there is a partial tongue visible, but your purposes would require full length. If you create a carrier for the lead panel pieces by bonding plywood (drywall is not wear resistant) to the lead and have the ...


1

I would use wood glue versus hot glue. If the existing hole isn't too big, just find a screw that fits the hole, put glue in the hole and run the screw in to the hole/glue. If the hole is too big for the screw, add a toothpick (as d. george suggested) to tighten it up and add glue and screw. If the hole is REALLY too big, drill it out to match the size of a ...


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