New answers tagged

3

The easiest thing is likely to get a 1.5" long piece of tie wire. Put the tie wire piece into the hole and then hammer the nail back into the hole. The tie wire metal will allow the nail to get a secure hold in the stripped out hole. Your threshold is fastened to the subfloor. Really the only constraint here is the aesthetics of the fastener head in ...


3

Tapcons and similar are available in stainless: https://www.tapcon.com/products/concrete-screw-anchors/410-stainless-steel-tapcon


2

You have various options. The thickness of the fastener matters. Really a hot dipped galvanized fastener of sufficient thickness should last decades. Are you close to a marine environment? - that will speed oxidation of fasteners. If you want the fastener to never rust out you could go with stainless steel and epoxy. Something like HY-150 or there is a ...


-1

I would recommend something this: It is for wood, but I think it will do fine with thin steel. Name should be coach bolt. Drill hole through door big enough for thread on the bolt to pass freely. But too small for the rectangular extension under the head. Insert bolt from outside of the door and screw nut from inside. The extension should extend round hole ...


1

Another thing you might try is to create an "adapter plate" to spread the load of the door closer over a larger area of the door. As you've already experienced, that this sheet metal is not capable of supporting the door-closer forces centered at the 3-4 screws on the closer. A piece of aluminum plate could be used to spread the load to 5-10 screws ...


2

Have you considered old-fashioned butterfly anchors (AKA toggle bolts)? They're fairly burly, cheap, widely available, and don't require any specialty tools, equipment, machining, etc. Note that for a foam-filled door, you would need to do some fiddling to make sure the "wings" can actually open up in there, but just sticking a scribing tool in the ...


2

Could I suggest not using screws at all, and using something like 3M VHB (Very High Bonding) tape? Some varieties are stronger than rivets, at least according to 3M, and is used in a lot of places where rivets used to be used, such as in attaching various parts of cars to the frame, or in bonding parts of airplane wings together. See https://www.3m.com/3M/...


7

Since security could be a concern, I'd suggest a plate on the outside with square holes punched, or round holes drilled to accept carriage bolts that go all the way through the door and nuts on the inside. This will prevent anyone from being able to remove bolts from the outside. If you drill a clearance hole through the plate, you can use a file to square ...


14

This appears to be well suited to a rivnut installation. The threaded insert is placed in a hole sized appropriately to the insert, the tool is used to compress the portion inside the door and the threads remain for the bolt to engage. Rivnuts are best used on thin sheet material. Rivnut tools can be quite expensive, but those are primarily for production ...


15

Any type of threaded screw will eventually pull out. I'd think about using some bolt and cap nuts. You'd have to drill right through the door and can probably use the same holes on one side. I'd think about adding a few washers on each side for a little extra strength.


Top 50 recent answers are included