65

This particular type is a band hose clamp, worm screw, stainless steel. In Britain a Jubilee clip. 316 stainless steel worm gear hose clamp Grainger


53

It's a hose clamp. Any hardware or automotive store carries them in the US.


37

From the Harbor Freight Hook Assortment (item #67587), it's a straight line "hanging hook." Photo below from the above mentioned web site:


32

The nail heads aren't big enough for the holes. At that time carpenters didn't enjoy the vast array of fasteners and installation tools that we do today, so they may have used what was available at the moment. It did the job, right? ~ or ~ The carpenter had intended to replace them with lag screws and forgot. ~ or ~ There's something sensitive to ...


31

That's an expanding plug anchor as is commonly supplied by closet system manufacturers. Pull the nail out by the head (a locking plier works well), then pull the plastic plug out. Here's a representative item: ClosetMaid has a blog post on removal.


23

Looks like they used rivets. The only way to remove them, is to destroy them (drill them out).


23

Judging by the pitch and diameter you've measured, what you probably have is an American UNC 6-32 screw. There are many conversion charts on the interwebs, but if you refer to this one in particular you can see the diameter for a #6 thread is 0.138" or 3.5mm. The 2nd number in the UNC scheme is the number of threads per inch, so taking 25.4mm per inch and ...


23

That is simply called a threaded insert. It is either first placed into the mold, then plastic injected, or pressed in after the plastic handle is injected. Google images for "threaded inserts for molding". McMaster Carr or Fastenal if you want to buy some.


20

Big box stores (Home Depot, Lowe's, etc.) usually have a board hung up in their hardware aisle that you can use to identify threads/sizes of bolts and screws. You can just take your screw in and check it on the board. It looks like this: Search for "thread measuring gauge" or "thread size checker" if you want to buy your own to have at home.


17

Nobody uses a pneumatic nailer for drywall. And in a world where shortcuts are revered, that has to tell you something. You know this already, but screws are the gold standard. They stay put and they pull the drywall as close to framing as possible. Badly set screws can pop, but properly set ones don't. Nails were common in the past, but they were usually ...


16

Another common name for this type hose clamp is "gear clamp". They come in a variety of sizes to accommodate various hose diameters. (Image from PrecisionBrand.com.)


15

Any type of threaded screw will eventually pull out. I'd think about using some bolt and cap nuts. You'd have to drill right through the door and can probably use the same holes on one side. I'd think about adding a few washers on each side for a little extra strength.


15

Pilot holes are done for two reasons. One is to help prevent the stud from splitting and the second is to make the lag bolt or screw easier to install. The ease of installation is important because the head of a lag bolt can shear off when excessive torque is applied. As long as your lag bolts are firmly holding the TV in place with no wobble in the mounting ...


14

This appears to be well suited to a rivnut installation. The threaded insert is placed in a hole sized appropriately to the insert, the tool is used to compress the portion inside the door and the threads remain for the bolt to engage. Rivnuts are best used on thin sheet material. Rivnut tools can be quite expensive, but those are primarily for production ...


11

This is a ring shank nail they have very good pullout strength , Added for those that don't have 35+ years experience. The Ring shank nails I used in the 70's were 100% except for the tip. No matter how many groves are on the nail it is a Ring Shank nail!. We used them on sub flooring to reduce squeaking and on some kinds of siding where there were big ...


11

Those look like rivets to me. You can simply drill the rivets out to release the hinge, however reinstalling the door could be complicated. A simple solution is to drive out the swivel pin from the center of the hinge. Look under the bottom of the center swivel joint. There you should find a hole into which you can insert a 16 penny nail or equivalent. ...


11

Shaving some slivers of wood to take up the slack will work OK today, you probably won't achieve the rated holding power, and before long the wood will deteriorate and the plug will come loose. So don't do that, especially if it's something critical where a failure could do damage or injure someone. You could use an epoxy that is rated for metal and ...


10

I have had and solved this problem. There are three wood dowels on each side between those cam lock screws. You must cut them. When you do, you will be able to tilt the side piece in order to extract the screws. I did not feel like getting out my multittool for such a small job, so I used a sharp bread knife. The dowels are not even 1/4" so you will have no ...


10

I call them "pin anchors" but I think they have a longer actual name like "mushroom head drive anchors". The anchor is set by driving with a hammer, but can be "un-set" by unscrewing the pin because it has a twist thread on it. Just unscrew then pry out.


9

Yes, those are special pocket hole screws. They're basically just self drilling wood screws (which is why they have the fluted tips). Standard wood screws may work, but you are forced between trying to center a pilot hole at the bottom of your pocket or risk splitting the piece you're screwing into. As far as finding more of them, just search for "pocket ...


9

It's a scriber used for marking wood, metal, etc. for cutting or drilling.


8

Because it is easy to remove the nails if required to move the post. The nails mostly hold the post in position until the overall weight of the building bears down a lot of pressure on the post. At that point it is mostly friction between the upper post plate and the beam that holds the post in position.


8

Get a pair of vise-grip locking pliers: They clamp down and can turn ANYTHING. I used them to remove some one-way screws. Just be careful never to try them out on your fingers, unless you like the idea of having your bones replaced with metal implants.


8

Called 'pop' rivets in the UK, also 'blind' rivets, since you don't have to have access to the other side on the part receiving the rivet. Be careful drilling out, as the centre pin is steel, and the rivet is aluminium. If you drill out too large, and wish to use the same holes, you can have problems finding a suitable replacement. 1/8" is a common size, but ...


8

Yes, keeping lags centered in studs is important. The following is minimum for BOLTS IN WOOD: Edge distance: Perpendicular to grain: 4 times dia. Parallel to grain: 1.5 times bolt dia. End distance: When in tension: 7 times bolt dia. When in compression: 4 times dia. Center-to-Center spacing: Perpendicular to grain: 2.5 times dia. Parallel to ...


7

Looks to me like a drywall screw or nail has "bubbled out". It happens sometimes due to wall movement, especially with weather swings (like a real wet winter or a long drought). It also happens when moisture gets to a nail or screw and causes it to corrode. Hopefully your kinda new roof is not leaking. I don't see any signs of plaster discoloration ...


7

The bigger question is how many vertical supports and how long are they? 1/4" lags 2” into the 2x4 has 510lb pull out strength (255lb/inch) put 2 or 3 in each piece of strut and each one can handle hundreds of pounds. 5/16” lags 266lb/inch; 3/8"lags 305lbs/inch. You don’t need a very big lag bolt when using multiples. My examples have a small safety factor ...


7

In apartments that I have renovated it is standard to install metal channel furring strips. If you want depth you cross these with 1x or 2x4. The channels you glue and screw into ceiling. The wood is screwed into the channels. There are plenty of LED lighting kits that are sold now that can fit into 2-3 inches of space (remember you have the drywall ...


7

"M" screws are all metric, by standard. The number following the M is the outer diameter of the screw threads, in millimeters, so an M4 screw's threads have an outer diameter of 4mm. See Wikipedia for more information.


7

That looks like a ramset fastener (fancy schmancy powder-actuated nail) to my eye, not a screw at all. If you can't pry it out, you'll probably have to grind it off. Feel free to apply locking pliers to grab the head very firmly and wiggle it, but I sincerely doubt it will unscrew.


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