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65

This particular type is a band hose clamp, worm screw, stainless steel. In Britain a Jubilee clip. 316 stainless steel worm gear hose clamp Grainger


53

It's a hose clamp. Any hardware or automotive store carries them in the US.


31

The nail heads aren't big enough for the holes. At that time carpenters didn't enjoy the vast array of fasteners and installation tools that we do today, so they may have used what was available at the moment. It did the job, right? ~ or ~ The carpenter had intended to replace them with lag screws and forgot. ~ or ~ There's something sensitive to ...


30

That's an expanding plug anchor as is commonly supplied by closet system manufacturers. Pull the nail out by the head (a locking plier works well), then pull the plastic plug out. Here's a representative item: ClosetMaid has a blog post on removal.


23

Screws: It doesn't sound like you're reattaching the entire floor; this is more like strategic intervals to solidify the fastening. Your nail/screw rate is not as important as if you were attaching a new subfloor from scratch. Glue and screw is popular for more reasons than just rhyming You're going through this effort to make it right. So do it right.


23

Looks like they used rivets. The only way to remove them, is to destroy them (drill them out).


23

That is simply called a threaded insert. It is either first placed into the mold, then plastic injected, or pressed in after the plastic handle is injected. Google images for "threaded inserts for molding". McMaster Carr or Fastenal if you want to buy some.


22

Judging by the pitch and diameter you've measured, what you probably have is an American UNC 6-32 screw. There are many conversion charts on the interwebs, but if you refer to this one in particular you can see the diameter for a #6 thread is 0.138" or 3.5mm. The 2nd number in the UNC scheme is the number of threads per inch, so taking 25.4mm per inch and ...


20

Big box stores (Home Depot, Lowe's, etc.) usually have a board hung up in their hardware aisle that you can use to identify threads/sizes of bolts and screws. You can just take your screw in and check it on the board. It looks like this: Search for "thread measuring gauge" or "thread size checker" if you want to buy your own to have at home.


16

Another common name for this type hose clamp is "gear clamp". They come in a variety of sizes to accommodate various hose diameters. (Image from PrecisionBrand.com.)


16

Nobody uses a pneumatic nailer for drywall. And in a world where shortcuts are revered, that has to tell you something. You know this already, but screws are the gold standard. They stay put and they pull the drywall as close to framing as possible. Badly set screws can pop, but properly set ones don't. Nails were common in the past, but they were usually ...


11

This is a ring shank nail they have very good pullout strength , Added for those that don't have 35+ years experience. The Ring shank nails I used in the 70's were 100% except for the tip. No matter how many groves are on the nail it is a Ring Shank nail!. We used them on sub flooring to reduce squeaking and on some kinds of siding where there were big ...


11

Those look like rivets to me. You can simply drill the rivets out to release the hinge, however reinstalling the door could be complicated. A simple solution is to drive out the swivel pin from the center of the hinge. Look under the bottom of the center swivel joint. There you should find a hole into which you can insert a 16 penny nail or equivalent. ...


10

Don't wait for the carpet installers. Find your worst squeaks, cut through the carpet and padding, and put the screws in there right now. Then you can hit any missed spots and otherwise stay out of the installers way tomorrow.


10

Shaving some slivers of wood to take up the slack will work OK today, you probably won't achieve the rated holding power, and before long the wood will deteriorate and the plug will come loose. So don't do that, especially if it's something critical where a failure could do damage or injure someone. You could use an epoxy that is rated for metal and ...


10

I have had and solved this problem. There are three wood dowels on each side between those cam lock screws. You must cut them. When you do, you will be able to tilt the side piece in order to extract the screws. I did not feel like getting out my multittool for such a small job, so I used a sharp bread knife. The dowels are not even 1/4" so you will have no ...


9

Yes, those are special pocket hole screws. They're basically just self drilling wood screws (which is why they have the fluted tips). Standard wood screws may work, but you are forced between trying to center a pilot hole at the bottom of your pocket or risk splitting the piece you're screwing into. As far as finding more of them, just search for "pocket ...


9

The velcro type product you posted looks like it has adhesive on both sides. The velcro itself would probably be plenty strong if the straps are large enough, but I suspect that adhesive on the wall would not work out well. It could fail too easily by simply ripping the top layer of paint off. Or, when you do want to move you are going to rip a big chunk ...


8

Screws. Nails will pull out over time.


8

Because it is easy to remove the nails if required to move the post. The nails mostly hold the post in position until the overall weight of the building bears down a lot of pressure on the post. At that point it is mostly friction between the upper post plate and the beam that holds the post in position.


8

Get a pair of vise-grip locking pliers: They clamp down and can turn ANYTHING. I used them to remove some one-way screws. Just be careful never to try them out on your fingers, unless you like the idea of having your bones replaced with metal implants.


8

Called 'pop' rivets in the UK, also 'blind' rivets, since you don't have to have access to the other side on the part receiving the rivet. Be careful drilling out, as the centre pin is steel, and the rivet is aluminium. If you drill out too large, and wish to use the same holes, you can have problems finding a suitable replacement. 1/8" is a common size, but ...


7

Looks to me like a drywall screw or nail has "bubbled out". It happens sometimes due to wall movement, especially with weather swings (like a real wet winter or a long drought). It also happens when moisture gets to a nail or screw and causes it to corrode. Hopefully your kinda new roof is not leaking. I don't see any signs of plaster discoloration ...


7

That looks like a ramset fastener (fancy schmancy powder-actuated nail) to my eye, not a screw at all. If you can't pry it out, you'll probably have to grind it off. Feel free to apply locking pliers to grab the head very firmly and wiggle it, but I sincerely doubt it will unscrew.


7

According to the IKEA instructions here, that side piece gets inserted then the cam lock thing is turned clockwise to lock it in place. I assume that removal would be the reverse - turn the screw counterclockwise. Start trying to pull it apart as you turn because the assembler may not have turned it all the way.


6

Shear strength of the hardware isn't going to be a real concern. A single 1/4" Grade 5 lag bolt, in a configuration like this, will fail at roughly 13,000 lbs. Even 1/8" lag screws (well down into "numbered" screw sizes) will have a shear strength of over 3,000 pounds. Your piece of slate, if its density and dimensions are fairly regular for the species of ...


6

The bigger question is how many vertical supports and how long are they? 1/4" lags 2” into the 2x4 has 510lb pull out strength (255lb/inch) put 2 or 3 in each piece of strut and each one can handle hundreds of pounds. 5/16” lags 266lb/inch; 3/8"lags 305lbs/inch. You don’t need a very big lag bolt when using multiples. My examples have a small safety factor ...


6

In apartments that I have renovated it is standard to install metal channel furring strips. If you want depth you cross these with 1x or 2x4. The channels you glue and screw into ceiling. The wood is screwed into the channels. There are plenty of LED lighting kits that are sold now that can fit into 2-3 inches of space (remember you have the drywall ...


6

"M" screws are all metric, by standard. The number following the M is the outer diameter of the screw threads, in millimeters, so an M4 screw's threads have an outer diameter of 4mm. See Wikipedia for more information.


6

A (usually) reversible way to remove a door is to drive out the hinge pins. Pry off the bottom caps and then from below insert a "drift" or a large nail and tap with a hammer. Before prying off the bottom caps try inserting a thin drift into the hole in the bottom and pushing the hinge pin up far enough that you can get screwdriver on the underside of the ...


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