10

Sleeve It When running any tubing (PEX, ABS, PVC) through concrete you need to de-couple it, Even 6mil plastic suffices, but sill guard is better. A tubing sleeve (e.g. 1.5in ABS) like you propose through the wall, is good too. Hot and Cold You can run PEX under ground. I have done this successfully. Hot and cold to the exterior, then cold to an out building....


7

I would build the shed on rollers or skids three feet from the neighbors' walls. Finish it completely and properly, then roll or slide it into position, lever it up and slip the timbers out. A 10x10 shed should be very manageable. Leave any unnecessary interior work for afterwards to keep weight down.


5

Well, that's a bit messy looking! The best repair would be to remove the two damaged planks and replace them with new ones. Next best would be to cut back the planks away from the hole and replace the pieces that cross the hole. Next best would be to install flashings that cover the hole. Mold is definitely a possibility. I see moss growing on the insulation....


4

A ladder can be difficult to manage on a slope. I'd use some scaffolding. You can get extensions to level the structure so that it can handle a slope. It's relatively inexpensive to rent. Talk to your local equipment rental dealer about some specific recommendations for your situation.


4

The outdoor recep does not need to be a "GFCI Receptacle". It can be a plain recep that is GFCI protected from a GFCI device in the nice dry indoors where it'll last a lot longer. If able, I would stick another junction box on the interior. Now, they make conduit nuts, and chances are the outside box (if it's watertight) has a threaded hole. It ...


4

Yes it’s ugly, I would cut some cedar 5/4 thick the with of that box and make a trim ring. Cedar won’t rot and is easy to work with a few finishing nails to hold the trim in place and it will look much better. Trim ring the size of the fixture not the box. Actually this meets code if the correct wiring was used. The KO or 4x4 box up under the eve is a “dry” ...


4

That looks like T1-11 you should be able to clean the caulk out and install a new piece. I don’t like leaving voids because wood destroying insects may find a way in and make it home. They probably put the panel there because it feeds the inside panel using the same opening. Some lumber stores have partial sheets of T1-11. I would get a piece and match the ...


4

A light is normally designed to mount on a junction box. If your post does not have a junction box built-in, you can either mount one on the outside or, if it is large enough and hollow, mount one on the inside. The wires going up to the box need to be protected from damage. Depending on the type of post, this may be done using conduit on the outside, or you ...


4

Your photo leaves a lot to be desired but this looks like multi-colored hexagonal SHINGLES instead of actual siding. UPDATE: Your new photo is very helpful. Clearly those are colored hexagonal asphalt shingles applied as siding.


3

That jamb is too far gone to be trying to fix it with a dremel, IMHO. You can buy new replacement jambs and just replace that side for not much money. Have you tried salvage yards, used building material stores to find a match?


3

The long answer. For the TL;DR, skip to the bottom A repair isn't difficult per se, but it will take time, energy and tools. That bottom rail of the door is a separate piece of wood glued to the two vertical stiles on either side. It is likely a reasonably standard "cope and stick" cut on the ends. You will need a router and a "cope and stick&...


3

If you can't straighten the pillars by mud jacking as Sherwood suggested, I'd suggest embedding rods into the pillars, then attaching the jambs (your 2x2 posts) to those and getting them nice and vertical. Once the jambs are vertical, it should be a piece of cake to attach the hinges and strike plate so your gate is centered, vertical, and balanced. Trim out ...


3

3/4" by 10" is a standard nipple size, it turns out If you're looking for a pre-threaded 10" length of GRC, you're in luck! As it turns out, 10" is a standard length for conduit nipples, so any electrical supply house, or even a big-box store, should be able to hook you up with a 10" nipple of 3/4" GRC/RMC. Given that you'll ...


3

You can use rigid as the ground it is done absolutely all the time. However both black iron and water pipe are code violations (how would anyone know?) The water pipe has a seam that is not smooth and the black iron is not galvanized. Rigid conduit uses the same dies as regular pipe if they have a machine there is no difference. The big deal is the center ...


3

Sounds like a pretty standard repointing job, other than the location - rake, chisel (or "grout-saw") out all the loose/deteriorated mortar to some convenient depth, wet the joints, pack in new mortar (keep it damp so that it cures, rather than drying out) and tool the surface. You'll find more information in general on "repointing brick" ...


3

All you need is 12-6" pieces of #14 AWG solid insulated wire. Wrap a piece around your guide wire about four times, hoop it around your light string and then wrap it around your guide wire four more times. If you wrap it tight enough, it won't slip. We did this for church carnivals all the time.


3

Visit your local hardware store and find whatever loops or rings they have that are cheap and easy to work with--ideally something that can be installed on the cable after it is installed. Even those cheap keychain carabiners would do well, at least until the hinge pins rust away. The rings will self-center to some degree, which is what you want. You may ...


3

If you'd rather not replace it and have some time to kill it is possible to re-surface the door. Door skins are thin veneer sheets meant for this purpose. The difficult part is ensuring the old doors exterior is flat and secure to the frame. Remove the knob and window frame. Patch and sand the old surface. Glue and nail and bowed/loose sections. Apply ...


3

Don’t cut the cladding. Cut an elongated hole long enough to enter and continue on the other side of the wall. Start your cut right after a stud punch the inside hole so the cable will make a lazy Z. Pull the cable through the 2 holes and seal the outside one with a paintable silicone calking. If you want a 90 yes cut the cladding but the problem then is ...


3

Myself, I'd use metal conduit, because conduit bodies can make pretty sharp turns. See this question. Since you're already sure a big metal snake will handle most of your bends, I'd just use FMC (Flexible Metal Conduit) between conduit bodies. In conduit, you run individual wires. This is less stiff (like how a ream of copier paper is less stiff after you ...


3

There are really only two likely possibilities here: Broken GFCI Repeated trips, dirt, water damage, insects, loose connections leading to arcing - there are a ton of reasons why a complex electronic device like a GFCI can fail. They are designed to fail safe when possible - i.e., off rather than on. If the GFCI has truly failed, the only fix is to replace ...


3

Use vinyl siding, build the two walls, stand the one with corner trim in place then stand and slide the other "mating" to the corner trim; end product looks like this (if you elect to pass on wrb). Sheath with zip wall, or with standard OSB and wrb to the face if you so please, install siding with corner trim choosing one side or the other for the ...


3

The good news is that it's PVC trim so you shouldn't experience any rot issues. The bad news is that's it's PVC trim so paint doesn't adhere to it easily. Properly, the trim should have been: Washed: by hand or light pressure-washing Let dry Scoured with 220 grit sandpaper so that paint can better adhere to it I believe the same effect can be achieved by ...


2

Since the surface is already painted I would not use a primer but getting that loose paint off will be important or the same will happen to this coat of paint. You could use a paint scraper or corse sandpaper to help clean the loose stuff up but I would use an angle grinder with a wire brush , I use cup brushes with twisted wire to clean even badly rusted ...


2

Duct seal. The stuff from the electrical aisle, not the stuff with a similar or identical name from the HVAC aisle. A non-hardening putty for sealing electrical ducts (conduits, holes in the wall) against water and insects. Usually gray. Removable and reusable. Comes as a "bar" or "brick" of putty in a plastic bag (at least when I've ...


2

Rigid Galvanized Conduit (RGC) and plumbing pipe starts out in the factory as the exact same thing, then there are two differences that take place in the final steps: The INSIDE of RGC is finished (honed) to be smooth so as to not cause wires to chafe. Plumbing pipe can have a ridge down the middle where it is welded and it can have galvanizing slag ...


2

A: Do it so it's adjustable. B: My first thought is to hang it so the gate is level. This would require that the gate NOT be centred since you have more lean on one side. C: Once the gate is level, then add trim pieces to hide the wedges of space. Have you checked out mud jacking? This is used here to relevel driveways, sidewalks and front steps. In ...


2

Assuming you'll own the house for more than 10 years replace it. That door is subjected to weathering and a fiberglass door will hold up a lot better and require virtually no maintenance. It would be a lot of work to repair the damaged door.


2

You may be able to replace the mount plate and tubular arm with a custom assembly of black iron pipe and fittings that acts as a stand. From bottom up... A 3/4" or 1" floor flange (whatever is large enough to cover the junction box) A vertical pipe of ~18" A 90° elbow to horizontal A pipe nipple of ~8" A 90° elbow to vertical (downward) ...


2

STOP. GFCIs don't just protect the 2 sockets. They can also protect wiring attached to them, and it's generally smart to use that feature to protect downline wiring, so you need fewer GFCI devices. A fault in that wiring will cause the GFCI to trip, and that is working as intended. So you can never condemn a GFCI until you pull it out and disconnect all ...


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