39

After following Tester101's answer, here is a detailed step-by-step with pictures of how I fed the cable. Shopping list (NOTE: given prices are current for 2014) Low voltage bracket $1.30 Premium Waterproof Silicone 2.8 oz $3.98 Leviton 1-Gang Midway CATV Wall Plate - White $2.79 Milwaukee 3/8 in. x 18 in. Bellhanger Bit $12.47 Coaxial Cable Feed-...


28

I'd drill from the inside out. Preparation inside Cut a hole in the drywall where you want the terminal. Cut the hole so that a "low voltage" bracket will fit. Drilling the hole If it's a 2×4 stud wall, your bit will only have to be ~5" long. Drill a hole in about the center of the drywall cut out. You can use a 3/8" installer bit, ...


22

The cause is simply nature. You've got wood that's outside. It gets wet, the wet stays in the wood, the wood rots. This happens when wood is left outside in an area where water can get stuck and the wood wasn't properly installed (no caulk) and isn't properly maintained (not regularly painted/caulked). Much of the rot seems to start near places where ...


17

Those are very good questions you asked the contractor. The result of the paint job is unacceptable. Besides being unsightly, the paint job will not have the longevity you want or expect, as the bubbles will pop or split on their own, and form a nice little place to hold water against your siding. The bubbling is most likely due to painting on a damp ...


13

No, that is not normal, nor satisfactory, nor remotely professional. It probably occurred from excess moisture present before the paint was applied. The solution is more work than simply painting: The blistered paint needs to be stripped, the bare surface prepared thoroughly, including drying—which could be done in winter with a tent and heaters, ...


10

In my experience in painting my own house over 50 years I only sand when necessary, that is when the paint is loose, or, the surface is glossy. I just repainted some trim on my house that has Semi-Gloss paint. And, I sanded it first. I did this to improve the adhesion of the new paint. But, most of my house has flat paint, and I never sand it unless I'm ...


10

The stainless steel screw will absolutely be the best screw to resist rust. Stainless steel screws are rust-resistant throughout the entire screw, not just on the surface. The other screws are only covered with a rust-resistant coating on their surface, which will break down or wear off over time. Galvanization is a process that coats with zinc. Other ...


10

Sleeve It When running any tubing (PEX, ABS, PVC) through concrete you need to de-couple it, Even 6mil plastic suffices, but sill guard is better. A tubing sleeve (e.g. 1.5in ABS) like you propose through the wall, is good too. Hot and Cold You can run PEX under ground. I have done this successfully. Hot and cold to the exterior, then cold to an out building....


9

Call your utility company and have the power shut off at the pole for the duration of your work in that area.


9

Because that's what wood does, especially when exposed to regular and/or prolonged moisture. The lack of gable overhangs on the home are a factor. Even cedar and other rot-resistant species have their lifespans, and apparently 25 years is it in your climate. You'll need to replace the boards (or the portions that are decaying) with properly treated or ...


8

The style of finish with several narrow vertical boards placed on broader surfaces is called board and batten. The battens are used to hides seams of the broader sections, and in more primitive construction, to fill cracks, block air, and improve insulation. The battens are not meant to be structural, but when nailed, screwed, or glued into place, add some ...


8

It's hard to say for sure without pulling it apart but your pictures suggest to me that you have water getting behind the wood at that corner. The reason I think this might be the case is that you basically have no visible problem except at the bottom of the board where it intersects with a horizontal piece. What I mean to say here is that this looks to me ...


8

A darker color absorbs more heat so yes it will heat the home more during the day. Your concern is valid. White is the least absorbent color and black is the most absorbent color.


7

In this case I would carefully remove any cotton or cloth covering on the existing wires, after shutting off the branch circuit. Hopefully this leaves you with a rubber or plastic layer, but either way it will be ok. Now push those wires back into the ceiling as much as you can. Mechanically rip that entire metal electrical box off the building. A non-...


7

A common way to handle this, is to build a railing in front of the door. You'll see houses built where a deck was optional, that have a railing built in front of the sliding door. Something like this... The best way to find out what is acceptable, is to contact the people who will be determining if your solution is acceptable.


7

Those nails are used only for holding down the roofing underlayment. They excel at doing so whether it be old school tar paper, or the newer more durable, hi tech roof underlayments.


7

Buy a 5" holesaw (and a drill sturdy enough to drive it). Cut a 5" hole in a big chunk of plywood. Screw/nail/clamp the plywood in the place where you want the hole. Drill away. If you're having a hard time with the drill binding and trying to twist your wrist off, run it in reverse. It's much slower, but you won't have the same problem. Couple more tips: ...


7

Many camera's like this popular Lorex model: come with a small 2" surface mounting "Plate" that you can use if you don't have electrical box mounting. They also screw into a 1/2" weatherproof threaded knockout, so that they can be used with 4" weatherproof flood light accessory plates:


7

Unless you limit usage to tiny kindling fires, this is a bad plan. Sparks are common when burning wood, and a slight breeze can put them almost anywhere. Logs burn at 600-1000 degrees F or more and hold a lot of heat in case of a tipover, etc. You will see smoke deposits almost immediately, not "over time". Wood smoke is very dirty. It's also likely that ...


7

We require “back priming”. That means pre-paint all surfaces before the trim is installed...especially cut ends. End grain on trim sucks up moisture more than side grain.


7

I would build the shed on rollers or skids three feet from the neighbors' walls. Finish it completely and properly, then roll or slide it into position, lever it up and slip the timbers out. A 10x10 shed should be very manageable. Leave any unnecessary interior work for afterwards to keep weight down.


6

Exterior light fixtures are designed so that the casing protects the electrical components inside them from the elements. Without an intact case, hail could break the bulb itself in the next storm, or rainwater could get in to short out the electric circuit. Your options are: find the manufacturer's name on the light fixture, and look them up to see if you ...


6

When installing that way you will not be able to get maximal tension because you need some space to apply the crimps. Also over time the cable will stretch. This means that you will need to retighten the cable a few times. That is impossible if you crimped the ends.


5

As with any advice you get here, keep in mind that you must stay within the bounds of IRC building codes adopted by your local municipality. Obtain a building permit and a local inspector will give you guidelines on minimum requirements for posts, beam spans, joist spans, etc... Your concrete piers must be a set depth to go below the frost line in your area....


5

The key question would be: How many winters has this pipe been like this and lasted without bursting? If it has made it through for many years, it should probably be good for many more. Does it have an indoor valve where you can turn it off and drain the water, similar to this: http://www.homedepot.com/p/Everbilt-3-4-in-Brass-Sweat-x-Sweat-Ball-and-Waste-...


5

Personally, we regard flashing tape as self-healing, to an extent. At least, to the extent that we don't worry about a few finish nails going through it. See, that tape and those fins are really just to deter condensation, not full-blown rain leaks. A couple pin-holes are acceptable.


5

I don't recommend this if the door is exposed to any sort of weather. The threshold is different. This is the big issue, as you don't want standing water, and an exterior door isn't designed to deal with indoor rain. You'd also end up with rain pooling on the top edge of the door, which might be bad. Make sure all the hinges are rated for outdoor use; you ...


5

I would not paint the copper. If you ever need to repair it, paint would be one more problem on making a good leak free connection. If you want to cover the pipe, use foam. Remember, copper water supply’s are quite common direct burial, the sun and elements won’t hurt it. I suggest insulation, if in a location that the temps drop below 27°F. (Yes water ...


5

Well, that's a bit messy looking! The best repair would be to remove the two damaged planks and replace them with new ones. Next best would be to cut back the planks away from the hole and replace the pieces that cross the hole. Next best would be to install flashings that cover the hole. Mold is definitely a possibility. I see moss growing on the insulation....


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