5

The only solution, is to install a code compliant grounding conductor, circuit breaker, and receptacle. The circuit breaker is easy. Since you're going from 30 amperes down to 20, you can simply swap the 20 ampere breaker in. However, since you're changing it to a 20 ampere branch circuit, AFCI and/or GFCI protection may be required. The receptacle is ...


5

The plug on the tanning bed is a 6-20P plug (250V 20 Amp), but the receptacle is a 10-30R (125/250V 30 Amp), so they aren't quite the same. The tanning bed expects 2 hots and a ground wire, but the outlet provides 2 hots and a neutral (which is almost, but not quite the same) The "correct" way to do this would be to replace the dryer plug with a properly ...


4

Get an extension lead rated for 13 A. You can get rubberised ones which are a bit tougher - you don't want to skimp on the price. Make sure it has some provision for mounting it on the wall and do so (use screws that won't rust, like brass or zinc-galvanised). That way, if water gets into the garage (like on those days it rains sideways) it won't get to the ...


4

The power cord would have to be short and made of 12AWG wire with ground. I would not go more than a few feet. Best to just have an outlet (dedicated) installed to the fridge. No special surge protector or special type of extension cord would be required other than the size I mentioned.


4

Short answer, vertical and strong. I have an old Saginaw Expand-o-Matic that opens from 24" to 90" and is designed to only use the end legs, no middle support. Not sure where you could find this hardware today though. You want the sliders to be vertical because the majority of the stress will be vertical stress of the table and contents weight. It also ...


4

There is a 3/4" extender sold by Cooper Industries (and maybe others). They call it a cover. This site sells it and it probably can be found elsewhere online. You need to be sure that the box in the ceiling is firmly attached to the framing, preferably directly screwed into a joist. Fan rated boxes have heavier duty attachments for the fan hanger and use ...


4

Gas The gas meter will have to be relocated. The gas company may handle the plumbing up to the meter, but you'll be responsible for extending the indoor plumbing to the new location. The gas may be off for a few days, while the relocation is completed, pressure tested, and inspected. Water Depending on the supplier and local requirements, the water meter ...


3

Can you - yes - with the application of sufficient money, anything is possible. Will it be cost-effective - probably not. Building, and then destroying a roof is a very expensive proposition. Removing roof framing and replacing it with an additional floor, likewise. If you wanted to do this in a way that might make fiscal sense, have the frame designed as ...


3

You typically use braided steel supply lines to connect the sink to your supply. You can get anything from a few inches long to a couple feet long.


3

This is fairly easy since you have that big header holding the roof up. You would remove the stucco on the header, at the bottom I would probably pull the trim exposing the frame of that short wall. Then I would build a wall with the opening for your window in the space and stucco the outside, once that is sealed up you could open the wall of the bathroom ...


3

42 inch Closed ... For up to 135" of leaves ..." http://www.moinhardware.com/page15/page15.html ... OR ... check out the table demo at 3:22 into this video: http://vimeo.com/55389782 also here: http://www.resourcefurniture.com/space-savers/space-saving-tables/goliath "...extends from 17” to 115” utilizing a unique aluminum telescoping mechanism."


3

White sheet metal screw through the overlapped sections. Or if you want to get fancy, a pop-rivet (converted from my comment). Note to Jack - some of the other SE sites seem to discourage 1 (or 2)-sentence answers. I have been asked on at least one occasion to convert an answer into a comment.


2

Not quite what you're looking for, but one option would be to cut the bevels off one end of each table, and join them together with pins, mending braces and glue. You'd need to really carefully plane the cut edges down to get a nice join. Then you could just continue to use the leafs as designed. The only drawback is that you'd have a 120" long table in ...


2

If you absolutely have to use a long extension cord I would use a 10 gauge. I also would feel the cord for heating as another caution. Some may feel this is overkill but like I said if you MUST use an extension cord these are my thoughts.


2

Never put a wire through the wall. It does violate code. You can use a recessed power strip (link below). You don't have to spend $80 on it, there are a lot more that are cheaper, but the one I am linking to has a good picture of all the essential components. A kit like this is code-compliant. If you put an extension power cord through a wall, it may ...


2

Make sure any unused plugs are covered with a proper CSA approved plug or purchase surge protectors with covers to prevent dust from gathering inside the surge protector which can over time start a fire. Replace on a regular basis especially if you have a serious power surge in your neighbourhood. A good rule of thumb is when the warranty expires. A regular ...


2

We just had the Fire Marshall visit our business and give us a fire inspection. We got wrote up for several things. Extension cords are for temporary use. If you need power at a remote point, get an electrician in and extend an existing circuit or run a new circuit. No Zip-Cord type extension cords to be used, Ever!! They don't have abrasion resistance ...


2

It really depends what you're powering Three cell phone chargers, you're gonna be fine. But a table saw and a dust collector, ain't gonna happen. The power-factor-corrected loads (i.e. Their VA not their watts) need to be added up. They need to be within the capacity of the circuit (15A=1800VA intermittent, or 12A=1440VA continuous). You should be ...


2

They make weatherproof aluminum junction boxes such as a Bell or Red Dot, with matching blank lid. To avoid box penetrations, their mounting screws attach to "ears" that attach to the outside of the box. The holes are threaded, as for pipe. To enter a cable into such a box, take a specimen of your cable (or its measurements) to a proper electrical ...


2

You can legally change the outlet, as long as it is “GFCI Protected” and marked “No Equipment Ground". You'll get the safety benefits of a third wire ground, though not all the surge protection benefits of your power strip. The GFCI units do use some 'vampire' power, about 1 Watt, 24/7. Section 406.3(D)(3) of the 2008 National Electric Code covers this ...


1

Yes, typically ground wires can be extended. It's always best to replace the entire ground wire, from the connection point, instead of splicing it when possible. I'm not sure if the ground wire you are speaking of is in a flexible pipe, part of a cord or an external green wire. That information (possibly a picture) would make it much easier to answer your ...


1

Presuming it is UL listed, it should safely work at its maximum rating. The biggest concern is that you can now have three high draw devices pulling power at once; you need to make sure this is never the case as you can over load the circuit. You hope the breaker trips, but you should double check the rating on the breaker as well on that electrical run.


1

The only way this would be possible, in theory, would be for you to slide the truncated boards out of their positions lengthwise, and replace them. The trouble is that most flooring 1) has a core composed of particle or fiber composite, which has very high friction, and 2) has joint surfaces coated with a waxy material to create a water-resistant seal, and 3)...


1

Your plan has some far more serious considerations than just the change of looks, approval of the neighbors and building activity access. You cannot just hang a two meter wide balcony decking on the side of the building without some careful engineering. Support legs for the outer edge that go to the ground or large angle braces that would attach to the ...


1

Rather straightforward, since all the power pins your water heater requires are present, and ampacity is the same. If you can't find it, hit the local electrical supply house and get the appropriate L14-30 plug N6-30 socket for cordage 10/3 cordage of your desired length, do not use Romex A big-box store is not an electrical supply house. Assemble ...


1

The answer is "it depends," and the architect or a local engineer who can look at the plans and the foundation is the right person to ask. For instance, if the wall in question is not load bearing, then it probably won't matter (unless there is some engineered shear component to the wall, in which case it might matter). If it is load bearing, maybe you can ...


1

There is not enough info to really answer, but generally as long as your willing to loose the two feet somewhere else then yes you can extend the kitchen. A lot depends on the type of construction and other factors, your contractor/builder will know best. Again, generally, as long as your staying inside the exterior walls, just about anything can be done. ...


1

Wire gauge tables for 16AWG list the maximum carrying current from 4 to 10 amps continuous; for 18AWG, 2 to 5 amps (for under 50-ft lengths, at least). I think it's unlikely that your fridge draws more than 2 amps under any conditions ( if you have a tag on the unit which lists watts, just divide watts by 120 (voltage) to get amps), so any extension cord ...


1

A lot depends upon whether you live where it can freeze. If you do then you want to bury the pipe from the house to the stock tank in the ground at a depth sufficient to prevent freezing. Then you want to use a frost-free farm or yard hydrant type valve to join with the buried water line and bring the water service up to the working level above the ground. ...


1

That is called a Shelly pole/mast clamp. If you are extending a fairly light load like you show, an antenna or other such fairly light, non load bearing use, then this is fine. For anything structural, or carrying live loads, this is the wrong product as you want to carry the load directly from top to bottom not laterally like this product does.


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