38

I think you have likely answered your own question. The use of an extension cord could cause a voltage drop, especially since the factory cord is long already and the spa probably has an electric motor that would be damaged by voltage drop. Also, cord/plug connections are not weatherproof. This is a CYA (cover-your-arse) by the manufacturer. Your plan of ...


30

The basic reason is that if they said, "Feel free to use an extension cord", someone would connect up a 50m, 3A, two-core cable with no Earth and a loose socket. They would then sue the company when it didn't work (too much voltage drop across long thin extension cables) or it caught fire (current drawn exceeds capability of thin extension cables) or they ...


17

No, you can't. An extension cord is designed for temporary use. Many of us (myself included) will use an extension cord on a "semi-permanent" basis. But it is quite different to have an exposed extension cord and a hidden extension cord. An extension cord is not designed - or rated & tested - for use in a hidden location. Use in that matter raises the ...


16

In most cases, simple switches are equivalent. They break the circuit and do nothing else. So switching (breaking the circuit) further down the line is usually fine. There are some exceptions, such as dimmers, multi-position switches, and multi-pole switches, none of which seem in play here. The computer is different because it need to be shut down (...


13

The issue here is voltage drop in the circuit supplying the saw. The saw's motor has an optimal voltage range, and will not run well if the voltage is too low. The voltage drops over the length of the extension cord; the longer the cord, the greater the drop. However, a heavier gauge cord will have less voltage drop than a lighter gauge cord. (Voltage ...


12

You would do well to pull some slack to that extension cord and arrange the plugs so that they at least face down. It is not just the GND terminal of the extension cord that is of concern. You also have the open prong holes on the stackable Christmas tree light string that is facing up. Water that gets into the electrical plug contacts raises the most ...


11

Extension cords that are not listed, labeled, or rated for permanent (long term) use are all temporary wiring devices. If you need to permanently connect an electrical device, you should use approved wires and/or cable assemblies installed in an approved manner.


9

I have always heard that the reason for the "no extension chords" is because they are not supposed to be used for permanent installations, only temporary, i.e., Christmas lights. Extension chords are pretty cheaply made and the ones I have had fail on me always fail at either the male or female end. If you're going to keep your tub inflated year-round, think ...


8

Nope! Your problem is that you need to fix whatever is causing the shocks and replace the butchered plug. There is no make-shift repair for this.


8

That's not how you use those outlets Those outlets are for putting a desk above them, and now you have power to the desk. I gather you've changed the usage of that room and now it is open space that is traversed by people, or you have a rug that can't fit without overlapping that floor outlet. Well, then, you don't use the floor outlet. It is illegal ...


8

The manufacturer will be guarding against both voltage drop on the supply (which could affect the operation) and creating too high a fault loop impedance (which could affect the disconnect time of the circuit breaker in case of a fault). At a guess, a minimum length, heavy duty extension lead will likely be fine. However, for peace of mind, if you can ...


8

The issue is electrical drownings One thing people really don't understand about electricity and water: a shock that would be trivial anywhere else is fatal when water is around. You're hit with a triple whammy. First, ordinary water and wet skin conduct electricity well, meaning a shock you barely felt before, now has much worse effect. "Water doesn'...


7

No it is not safe. A 15 ampere rated receptacle should not be installed on a circuit protected by a 30 ampere breaker. You should not be plugging devices that draw more than 15 amperes, into a 15 ampere rated receptacle. The receptacle in your photo is a 20 ampere receptacle, so you shouldn't have a problem plugging in a 20 ampere device. They make ...


7

99% of the time, the issue is the door sensor. Usually an infrared beam, it runs across the bottom of the doorway to reverse the door if anything blocks it. You'll need to check them. There's typically a green light unit (transmitter) and a red light unit (receiver). The red light will flash if there's no beam from the transmitter. Make sure they are ...


7

Simplest and most reliable option (no sliding contacts required) is a 1 foot extension cord (or a longer one, but 1 foot will get the desired degree of freedom.)


6

(note: this post assumes that by "gauge" you mean AWG) I expect the biggest issue with longer leads is likely to be volt drop, especially during startup when motors can draw substantially more than their normal running current. Volt drop during startup may cause slower startup or even failure to start which in turn can lead to overheating. I would suggest ...


6

Another option may be to put the connection in a protector sleeve like this: This one is available at Home Depot for $5.


6

Yes, the critical issue is voltage drop due to resistance, which is both a function of conductor size and plug connections. One 100' #12 cord is better than two 50' #12 cords, for example, because there will be fewer contact connections. I wouldn't hesitate to use your saw on a 100' #12 or #10 cord, assuming that you're not already at the end of a very ...


6

I have seen the same rules on devices for a bathroom. In my opinion its all about exposing bare wires. If the two (the extension and the power cord) are not a waterproof connection and resting on a floor (very common), then there is risk of shock. That is far more likely in a bathroom (or near a hottub) where water is common. I believe a better way is to ...


5

There are many reasons to not use extension cord or plug strips for certain applications. But setting those aside and assuming you understand the ins and outs of proper extension cord applications....there is a sane way to deal with the situation of the "tight spot". Assuming you purchase a reasonably decent extension cord such as: Do not cut and try to ...


5

The Uniform Fire Code covers extension cords. They are for temporary immediate use of an appliance and are not for permanent installation. The code is not available online but here is a page that references it: http://www.grand.k12.ut.us/district/fire.htm#anchor157315 However, extension cords are different from power strips (AKA Temporary Power Tap) in ...


5

This is one of the places where code and consumer parts don't match. I have tried in several cases to make code approved triplex adapters , even as a licensed electrician, I cannot do it legally , even with listed parts, I have asked several major mfg of cord caps for a way many years ago, because what you ask is reasonable, but in my state there is no way ...


5

To Avoid Fire As noted in other answers and comments, there are issues related to wire size and length that can cause overheating if not appropriately dealt with, and the issue of waterproofing the connection, both that can lead to shorts and fires. So You and Your Family and Your Friends Don't Die A person, just out of the hot tub, is covered with water, ...


5

Running the extension cords is not causing the problem but you're smart to install the outlets and correct the installation. The momentary operation of the wall switch triggers a normally open relay to close in the unit that operates the motor until the limit switches open the circuit. Check that relay.


5

Flip the electrical socket over Turn main breaker off, make sure both sockets are dead, 1 coverplate screw, 2 yoke screws, rotate 180, put it back in. Don't even need to take the wires off (actually: don't). Now your appliance cord is working as intended: giving a flush-to-wall socket that you can back furniture up against, yet allowing both sockets to be ...


4

No. If the two prong device is fairly modern, it is sufficiently insulated in its design so that it does not need a separate grounding line (these devices were often referred to as double insulated). It means that the designer has ensured that it is highly unlikely that a consumer can come in contact with a hot lead in the device. Many modern devices are ...


4

Don't risk your life over a power strip. Throw it away and get a new one. You can try taking it back and Ikea is pretty good with customer service. But I personally wouldn't be trusting an Ikea power strip with my computer equipment. I would get something a little more heavy duty and has surge protection. Also is your printer laser or ink jet? If ...


4

As Tester101 says, extension cords are not meant for permanent wiring. If you really need an outlet in a given location, you should consider having one installed. But there are a number of things to keep in mind when you are using extension cords. Don't staple them in place (big risk of damage) Don't use a cord that is rated for less amperage/...


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