12

As long as the heat is turned off the air handler fan can be run while the swamp cooler is running. Swamp coolers work on evaporation the water flowing over the plates causes the cooler and more humid air then the blower pushes this into the home. Folks may think the fan on the furnace air handler can’t be run because you don’t heat and cool at the same time....


5

That's just scale and mineral buildup. Evaporative coolers work by evaporating water; when they evaporate hard water that has minerals in it, the minerals stay behind. The better coolers have constant bleed lines or purge pumps to prevent this buildup by flushing it away. You can do it yourself by periodically draining all the water in the sump. Or you can ...


4

Yes, it is easy to control a swamp cooler with any thermostat. The problem is that in order to use a swamp cooler effectively, you need strategic openings (typically open windows) to let the air out. This is the part which is hard to automate. The best way to use a swamp cooler is to open windows in the rooms that need the cooling the most. You want as much ...


4

That looks like an Adobe P2-911 plug and it is proprietary. There's another version Adobe made (I believe it's for the 230v motors) that has a 5th round pin. The flat bladed terminal is for keying the connector so it can't be plugged in upside down. You should have a 115v cord with 2 hots - one for high speed and one for low speed, 1 neutral, and 1 ground.


4

This is how I ended up connecting the Nest thermostat. I did not connect the C terminal to the transformer since the Nest gives me an error "No power to Rc wire detected" if I do that. So far I haven't had any low battery issues since Nest is able to recharge itself from Rc wire.


4

Evaporative cooling is less effective in places with high humidity. There are mathematic formulas for how much water will be needed to cool a specified surface area by some number of degrees and they are not simple. The wiki article on this has some good information. It would be good to get some idea how much water will be needed before heading down that ...


4

The main reason swamp coolers are typically arranged that way is to minimize their footprint. That arrangement allows the motor to be inside the air-handler box, instead of poking out the end. Additionally, moisture is not as much a problem for electric motors as heat. The overwhelming majority of the moisture passing by the electric motor is vapor, or "...


3

Those air coolers or swamp coolers as they are sometimes called, will only work in an area with very low humidity. They use what is called "evaporative cooling" to achieve a lower air temperature and while operating produce a lot of humidity. They will not produce air temperatures that are as cold as an airconditioning unit but they will lower the ...


3

Where they work, swamp coolers work because evaporating water cools the air being pulled in (via latent heat of vaporization - go visit a chemistry site if that's a concept you haven't gotten in your education.) Making the air humid does not, in itself make it cool - at a given temperature, humid air feels warmer to people, as sweat evaporates poorly. ...


3

I personally think that it's best to buy a cooler that's a little above the rated CFM you actually need -- this will help ensure it actually cools your house to a comfortable level. Where I live in Albuquerque, NM, I often find myself in people's houses where the performance of the evaporative cooler is quite inadequate. It's better than nothing, but not ...


3

Place the bottom of the fabric in a shallow pan of water. It'll wick moisture continuously until the pan is empty. It should last a day at least, though. You could even suspend a wallpaper tray from the fabric itself, which you'd install on the curtain rod (assuming that it's robust enough). Place a rod through the ends of the tray with the curtain's hem ...


2

I wouldn't follow that recommendation by Mr. Solar due to safety and it's overkill. You don't want the potential to power both High and Low speeds at the same time plus the 3PDT relay is not required for anything, keep the DPDT. The standard method is to use a SPDT contact to change speeds so that voltage is only applied to either the Low or the High but ...


2

OK first thing I did was remove the motor and try it in a different unit. It worked OK. So the motor's not the culprit. Another option would be to use a volt meter on the plug where it plugs in (turn the fan switch on first, check for A/C between basically all pins) see if it's passing current up there or not. If yes, motor or connection to motor would ...


2

At minimum, you should drill weep holes in the cans to allow standing water to drain. If you are ambitious, remove them. The globs of tar you see at the lower edges were used to waterproof the fasteners that attach it to the roof. Scrape off the tar and remove the fasteners. Patch the fastener holes with roof tar. Remove the entire flashing, tuck the up-...


2

Turns out it was a loose belt. Once I tightened the belt between motor and pulley then it worked fine. Even the "low" speed was higher than what the old speed(s) both used to be.


2

The way evaporative cooling works is that it forces air through moistened pads, evaporating the water and cooling and humidifying the air. The cooled and humidified air is then blown through the house and back outside again, lowering the interior air temperature and producing a cooling breeze as well. If I understand you correctly, you are asking if you ...


2

I'm concerned about @ThreePhaseEel's comment on how the Nest will respond to the switching 24VDC that the diode bridge will provide. Although I'm confident that would be an appropriate location to pull a common wire from, I'm going to construct my own circuit from more standard parts.


2

Oof, what a pain, I had a Champion swamp cooler with the same issue, except the collar was also rusted on. There's absolutely no way of getting leverage outside of possibly removing the entire squirrel cage, but then I'd be chancing the other side not coming off after the effort of removing the pulley wheel etc. Wasn't sure what I was going to do but after ...


1

This is not a well-known practice around here, so there's not going to be a lot of battle-test advice to be given. Therefore, you should figure it out yourself. Here's a possible way to do that. Get an infrared heat thermometer, non-contact, then measure the temp of the outside sunny wall and the inside wall. If there's little in/out difference, it's a good ...


1

BT ( bacillus thurngensis ) will kill insects . It is not a biocide so will not affect animals.It kills anything with an alkaline stomach and has no affect on anything with an acid stomach like an animal. Commonly available at garden shops.I can't imagine a problem in your system. It can be put into ponds as it does not affect fish. It can be sprayed on ...


1

You want to clean them with a non acid cleaner. I use a product called Nu-Brite, I use it for hvac coils and have also used it for these filters , these are really dirty they should be cleaned regularly at a minimum 1 per year if dusty maybe 1 per month while the system is in use. You should also dump the sump regularly, when rinsing what ever cleaner you ...


1

From the looks of those wet water filter pads I do not think I would want air sucked through them to be circulated around my house. Get some clean new ones. They are not really that expensive.


1

As it seems evident that you did not cover the cooler in the winter as described by Michael and Jim, I would venture to guess that warm air you heated going up the vent prevented any noticeable cold draft coming in there - there are probably plenty of other gaps lower down on the house providing fresh cold air for your heating system to heat and send up the ...


1

The evaporative coolers that sit on roof are normally serviced in the fall at the end of the usage season. Typical service includes shutting off the water supply to the cooler, draining the water sump in the cooler, cleaning away any debris and leaves that may have accumulated around the unit and then installing a cover over the whole cooler shroud. The ...


1

we use the same pads on our greenhouses they run all year round and last us around 5 years i find dosing periodicaly with clorine or hydrogen peroxide helps prevent alge buildup that clogs the pasageways but id your housing keeps light off the pads that should be less of a problem


1

You're going to be up there at least twice a year, to put on and remove the jacket, so check the state of the pads each time. You won't need to replace them every year, but treat them like any filter - if it looks dirty or clogged, it probably needs replacing. The pads in your photo don't look bad - I'd leave them for now, and check again in Spring.


1

Stick closed-cell backer rod into the larger gaps. Then caulk over everything (small gaps as well as the backer rod) with a good exterior-grade caulk that looks good color-wise when connecting them.


1

You already have a source of cooling: the outside air. The "little demon" you are looking for is a thermostat. A thermostat that controls a window fan. Something like this: http://www.amazon.com/Bionaire-BW2300-Window-Remote-Control/dp/B000065DKJ Install the fan vertically with the upper fan set to blow air out, and the bottom fan set to suck air in. ...


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