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13

With the epoxies I have used minor imperfections like small divots from a heavy object chipping the floor are usually filled in. The epoxy can make a very slick surface. For instance, I coated one bay of my shop that I do automotive work in and wanted it like glass so oil spills were easier to clean. This worked great until I spilled some antifreeze. The ...


12

What is the metal you're screwing into part of? Depending on that and the screw material, there's a high probability heating it up sufficiently with a torch (As little as 200F/93C may soften it) will allow you to get the offending bolt out and expose the surface of the epoxy so that you can try to use a powerful adhesive remover to dissolve it. I'm ...


11

Sheet aluminum and pop rivets. Extra points for using old beer cans as the aluminum source, label side out, but flashing is a bit thicker than today's beer cans. Hairy (loaded with fiber reinforcement) Bondo. "Bondo Hair" is the actual label on the can. Some screws or pop-rivets might still be needed to help the bond to the plastic at the edges. Looks awful,...


8

The easiest and most cost effective way of dealing with it is to paint over it with something like drylok. You can't really do anything about the smell itself other than removing the epoxy but you can put up a good barrier.


7

The plan will make the 4x4s look good. However, you did say they are LOAD BEARING, an epoxy is great for holding things together or protecting things, but terrible at withstanding stress from a load. The posts function is to transfer the weight above it to the ground, so filling in the rotted parts of the wood with epoxy is just hiding the problem. Most ...


5

I have built a few and I used casting resin. i got it from a fiberglass boat builder. it set up very fast but is self leveling. we let it drip off the sides and cleaned up the edges after it cured with a router and 440 and 1600 paper. I have encased fishing lures, German coasters etc. it cures hard as stone and very transparent. It has to be poured ...


5

Possible, yes. Recommended - probably not. What purpose to you intend it to serve? Why do you think epoxy coating (intended for application to concrete) makes it better for the purpose? With or without coatings, is particle board even remotely suitable for the purpose? Responding to comment: Marine plywood would have been a much better choice of material - ...


4

I think you're going to need more airflow than just open windows. You can probably rent a large air mover from your local home improvement store in order to circulate lots of air around. Alternatively, try getting in touch with a local company that deals with cleaning up basement floods as they will have the same type of air movers. You're looking for ...


4

I recently learned something about injection molding. While this is a completely different process, it may be somehow related to this topic. When plastics engineers want to produce a flexible or partially flexible part, they choose to make the parts from elastomeres in the past (e.g. rubber or silicone). Unfortunately elastomeres are nearly impossible to ...


3

Buy a replacement hood ASAP if you have this thing sitting outside. An old hood will cost you $50. Everything under it will wear/rust much faster with no hood.


3

Backyard boatbuilders often work with epoxy and polyester resin like Mr. Homes mentions. Saran Wrap and waxed paper are popular and common materials for creating surfaces for containing these resins. Masking tape will not be easily removed. When selecting your resin, keep in mind that you may have some control over how fast it sets. Some resins are made to ...


3

Man I have done quite a few of these tubs and it is god awful. The whole process sucks. I did do it one my own home but was when rest of family was out of town for weekend. Did it Friday night. Left all windows in house open all weekend with three fans blowing air out of bathroom. By Monday the house was so-so. The bathroom still stank. We just didn'...


3

Microballoons. Tiny glass or phenolic bubbles. They are the standard product for mixing into epoxy when you need a paste. Should be available at any place that caters to boat repair. Plugging the hole with masking tape or similar may also work perfectly well in this case. If you can arrange to hold the bolt in with pressure, you could also use a large ...


3

You can cut expansion joints with something like this: This is a walk-behind concrete saw that can be rented at most rental centers (I know that home depot has them). After the joints are cut, fill them with a good polyurethane caulking. I would wait until after you cut the joints before filling the existing cracks, as it's likely the work you're doing ...


3

Always, and I mean always, make sure that the surface you are putting epoxy on is Clean (e.g. free of any dust residue or particles) The floor needs to be passed at least once with a floor grinder so you can achieve a professional smooth finish. If it's dyed epoxy, i'd suggest contracting it out. Don't mess up your floor; epoxy is unforgiving!


3

I made an account because I saw this question, First I hope I don't forget and never come back here again, and second, depends on many conditions. I have experience working for 5 different company dealing with protective coatings, specifically, or managed that department. Most only lasted a year or so, except one 6 years, because it paid the best and was the ...


3

Do an experiment on a slab of anything of similar roughness -- a chunk of garage floor would do. Make a virtue out of a necessity: Make the edge at a logical division of the space, and change colours of paint, or change colours of glitter at the transition. If you want to be fancy, make it a zig-zag or Peano curve Mask shapes onto the floor. Stack the ...


3

Glue doesn't work by "being absorbed into the wood" as you say. It forms a bond to the wood surface. The problem here is your choice of material, chipboard. This s simply a compressed mass of wood chips held together with some glue. As you have discovered, those particles are not held together all that strongly. It's not clear why you can't use ...


3

Alaska Man's epoxy suggestion is what came to mind for me as well, but it might be difficult to get a nice edge without a lip of some sort. I admit that I've never worked with the stuff. I think I'd be ordering a sheet of 1/4" glass with a pencil edge. It would probably look great and wouldn't cost much. Wouldn't have to be tempered if you're careful ...


3

Isherwood has good points about the capacity of the floor slab, you need to confirm what you have. A standard 4" slab may not hold up to the rigors of the lift. If the install guide says differently or you know you have a thicker slab that can take it, then carry on... Non shrink grout is typically used for this type of condition. Pack it fully by ...


2

I have cut posts off and poured concrete under them to get them above grade. The pics below show a 12" diameter post, but an 8X8" square poured under the cut off post could work with proper anchoring. I thought I had a picture of the finished post, but I could not find one, but you might get the picture. Yours may only need to be 12" tall.


2

I think the answer to your first question is already evident to you. If you cannot get to it, you cannot paint it. They do manufacture some specialty application tools for tight areas, such as mini-rollers and "paint gloves": My experience with these items has been less than fantastic, but maybe getting some paint on those hidden areas is more important ...


2

I had the same issue. You do not have to hire an asbestos removal company for this. I purchased my epoxy from epoxyplus.com. They told they always recommend that their customers put a product called perfect primer down over their old tiles or glue floor (as long as the tiles were not loose), then apply their epoxies on top of that. I took their advice and ...


2

I think you need new pipes, man.


2

There is a Dremel Grout removal attachment, which consists of a fixture to hold the tool at a 45 degree angle, and you can get a 1/16 inch carbide cutter bit. I've used this setup several times to remove grout for renewal or tile replacement. It can work quite well if the grout is really a sixteenth wide. Its not easy, but you can chip the tiles if you'...


2

You will run the least amount of risk of chipping the tile if you do the job with hand tools. Use a 1/16” carbide grout saw, and you don’t need to remove all of the grout to the bottom of the tile, just more than 1/16”. Pulling the tool is safer for the tile than pushing it.


2

I would consider making the smallest pile of everything and putting the transition where it will be least noticed - if that is a quarter section then fine. But have the transition hidden as much as possible or obscured - sofa or table etc etc


2

As Kris already indicated with a link in a comment, the solution for "big" equipment is usually not Home Depot. Some Home Depot rental departments are better than others, so you may have better luck if you check other area stores. But there are plenty of places where the only thing they do is rent equipment, so they: have a larger variety of equipment ...


2

In a previous life around 1976 we moved an 80 year old chapel with hardwood floors to a new site. Between the age, inexpensive initial hardwood, and the move there were many wide cracks in the floor. The contractor (who built Fort Edmonton) had us mix fine sawdust (from sanding the floor -- so the sawdust was already part varnish) with varnish and stuff ...


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