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12

Solid wood flooring in a wet area is inherently risky due to the moisture everywhere. Pine flooring (a moisture-absorbent softwood) is inherently risky to install. Solid boards are inherently more prone to cupping than engineered boards. Gluing a wood floor to concrete is inherently risky because concrete is a big sponge that absorbs and releases moisture in ...


8

@iLikeDirt covered a lot of important information, but I'd like to add something since the majority of the information assumes that there is a problem of excess moisture due to the concrete, while the expert assessment says it is actually dry cupping that is the problem. Dry cupping implies that the interior humidity is dropping below the average ...


7

Well, it turns out, the answer is I'm an idiot. I misread the guidelines and used the wrong gauge of staples. As the result, I got this textbook description from the manufacturer: IMPORTANT: Be sure not to over-drive the fastener past the nail slot, this can lead to a condition known as a telegraphing fastener. A telegraphing fastener is the ...


7

You could simply install a transition piece between the two rooms. But if you're determined to get them to match up, then 1/4" luann board will do nicely. Glue and screw - 1/4 bead of glue distributed evenly over each board, screws on a 1 foot grid. NOT going overboard is what leads to squeaky, shifting sub-floors that make for a shoddy looking finished ...


6

There is nothing wrong with putting engineered flooring on your slab in Florida. It can last a really long time and I have installed it in my own home on slab and helped with other homes. Buy a really good wood. Make sure that you really give it a scratch test. Get samples and whatever. I used to take pennies, screwdrivers, smack my wife heals, all ...


4

There is no reason to glue down engineered hardwood floor to an underlayment. This is just for initial aesthetics. The glue will NEVER last (in a residential setting). The only thing the glue will do is give you fits and make your install seem tighter. Within weeks or months the glue will come loose and you will have a floating floor. Nothing wrong with ...


4

I won't go as far as @MichaelKaras but I would never lay 7 inch planks on concrete unless the concrete was 20 feet up in the air in an apartment building. Since yours is ground level you need to have a flooring system installed before you can do wood again. Meaning insulation then plywood subfloor and then your wood floors - probably engineered. You are ...


3

You are, IME, IMHO, using the wrong tool, definitely. A (sharp) hand ripsaw would be preferable. A circular saw would be preferable. A bandsaw would be preferable. A tablesaw would be ideal ...but a circular saw is far less expensive than a tablesaw and still pretty capable with a rip guide.


3

For what it's worth, what I wound up doing is using the Floor Muffler underlayment, which is its own moisture barrier. As per the directions, I applied it over the subfloor and about 2" up the walls. It's hard to see, but I have indeed left an appropriate half inch expansion gap between the wood and the drywall. And this is engineered hardwood so I don't ...


3

A 5/32" depression is not that bad actually. Assuming you don't have a problem with the floor joists that need to be stiffened, you have a couple of options. First, I would span the area with a 8 or 10 foot straight edged board to visualize the areas that are depressed. Much like your pic, I'd pencil out the area on the floor so you can see it clearly. Be ...


3

Don't worry about making new tabs or grooves. Just cut the offending tabs off. For the planks on the floor, use a sharp chisel. For the new boards, cut them on a chop saw. You want the two mating faces to be as perfectly square as possible, otherwise you will end up with a gap or one board riding up over the top of the other. In places where you still have ...


3

I really doubt you can sand your floors. Some engineered floors can be but this is a very small percent. And this would be a diy because pros won't want to be responsible for the thin top layer sanding through. One of the things I have found with engineered hardwood is the clear coat varies drastically from different types. I have tested a lot and some ...


3

Drill oversize holes (3/8" to 1/2" or so) just through the flooring that are still concealed by the divider's base plate, and mount the divider directly to the subfloor. You may want to use nylon or metal bushings to hold the divider at the same level as the floor (to avoid pinching the flooring), and you may need to purchase longer screws. Use a sharp bit,...


3

I would drill a hole straight through the laminate and anchor the divider to the concrete underneath using something like this: or or If the underlay between your laminate and the concrete subfloor is in any way compressible, you should probably add a bushing to prevent you from compressing it when securing the anchors. The bushing should be the same ...


3

I would consider the lace mesh rubber mats that are sold for use under area rugs. Almost anything else is going to result in a lot of movement, which will be unpleasant for the occupants as well as increases the risk of damage to the hardwood.


3

Underlayment doesn't settle or compress appreciably, and you usually won't find varying thicknesses of your particular choice of flooring. You'd have to change brands to change thickness. Unless you have some specific height need, purchase what suits your fancy. The transition between the new and old floors should accommodate, and a difference in height of ...


3

I've done things like this on a number of occasions, and the problem is that you'll create more bumps than you resolve. Only the inner portion of your depressions measures 1/8", and fairly quickly they taper up to a smaller dimension. This means that the edges of your shingles are almost always too thick for their position. Also, they're crunchy. For at ...


3

The "48 hour" timeline assumes the flooring cartons are laid out to "acclimate", with air only getting above the cartons. Get air underneath them. Take your first day or two's worth of packages and lean them against a wall so air can access them on both sides. If you want even faster adjustment, bust them out of packages and fan them out individually ...


2

Have you considered using cork as an underlayment? I believe they make them in various thicknesses, including 1/4". It's very easy to work with (you can cut it using a utility knife) and it helps dampen sound.


2

From the Pergo Installation Instructions (Section 10d, page 6): If the Pergo Product being installed has an attached foam underlayment then use only a vapor barrier when installing over a concrete subfloor. When installing a Pergo Product with an attached underlayment foam over a wood subfloor no other additional acoustic underlayment should be ...


2

I am sorry I don't have time to research this right now but I will give you a quick answer and maybe edit later. First - call Pergo and ask. Second, I have installed 4 different types of Pergo+underlayment and all of them say to take out old underlayment. I think there is first an issue with the floor becoming too spongy and second if there is spongy/...


2

You have another very viable choice too. There are two parts to this one. First you arrange the design of the planned for final moldings to include a combination of baseboard and shoe molding that will cover up the flooring expansion gap and then some. Knowing how much additional overlap there will be of the molding over the top edge of the flooring will ...


2

Are the cabinets on top of the first layer? Why remove just the second layer and not the first as well? To remove both you could use a circular saw with the blade depth carefully set to the combined thickness of the two floors (or just a hair shallow, using a utility knife to finish the cuts).


2

Well your pad needs to line up with existing pad - so sand any issues and glue down new padding. Try to use as little amount of strips possible and duct tape everything together. Make sure the length of each plank is in the grooves. Clip the tabs off on the ends. I would glue the ends together. Then I would go back after glue is dried and put 2 ...


2

I'd vote #4 = fewest cuts, least amount of labor, least amount of waste. It's also see as the 'default' as most argue that floors look best when laid in the direction parallel to widest walls. For real hardwood, the general rule of thumb is to lay it perpendicular to the floor joists. This is to add strength. It probably adds a little strength to laminate ...


2

Most stair treads are a true 1" thick also known as 5/4" milled. Anything less than that might sag when you walk on them depending on how it's framed. You can use 3/4" thick boards for the risers. Flooring can be all sizes for thickness depending on the application and manufacturer because you have a subfloor to attach it to. Thinner floors make ...


2

Matt, your install looks good. Replace the board, should take a whole 20 mins takes us 5-7 mins. You might realize something small was under the wood. Worse case, you replace both and issue is gone. Remember to rip the bottom of the groove.


2

DO not overlap as it will cause a noticeable uneven floor when walking over the areas. We cut to size and tape where the underlayment meets. Overlap the wall areas and once flooring is complete prior to baseboard installation, simply cut along the edge (leaving a 1/4"-1/2" overcut) and tuck the underlayment under the sheetrock. This allows an overlap of ...


2

You are heading the right way with your first thought, although I rip out the middle 3/4" and chisel out the ends where the saw will not get to. Pulling out the center will allow the saw to stay away from the nails or staples holding the piece down and will let the groove side slip out. Use the chisel at an angle to get the remaining stapled in part by ...


2

There are "tee" moldings, or transition moldings, that the flooring people make that goes with the new laminate that you are planning to use.


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